New grains and pulses are here! Straight from northern Greece, chickpeas, lentils, fava, bulgur and many more. There is nothing more comforting than a warm soup of nutritious grains or pulses to fight winter blues. Hm. Maybe except a pie.

Greeks are famous for their pies. Any Greek cook will know how to make a pie. Or they will know someone who makes them. They used to be the food of the poor.  Even today, you would make the filling with whatever’s in your fridge.

Today we are making a pie with bulgur and (what else) feta cheese.  This recipe is by a Greek chef Nikos Katsanis, adapted for you.

For one large baking tray

2 sheets of puff pastry
230g bulgur
30g semolina flour
650ml of whole milk plus more if needed
2 eggs plus one more for glazing
170g crumbled feta cheese
A few springs of mint (or other herb of your linking)
Olive oil for the pan
Salt, pepper to taste

In a pot warm up the milk and just before it reaches its boiling point, add the bulgur and cook until bulgur is tender, approximately 15 minutes, stirring regularly, adding some more splashes of milk if needed. Add the semolina flour and stir for another 10-15 minutes until you get a thick cream-like mixture. Turn off the heat and let it cool, stirring every so often so that no crust is formed.

Once the mixture is cooled down, add the feta cheese, eggs and mint (you need the mixture  to be cool so that you don’t cook the eggs with the heat). Season with salt and pepper.

Oil your baking tray and lay the one sheet of puff pastry. Place the bulgur-feta mixture and spread it evenly, using your fingers or the back of a spoon. Place the other sheet of puff pastry on top and pinch together the edges. If there is leftover puff pastry and you are feeling creative cut shapes of your linking and “glue” them on top using some water. Brush the pie with the beaten egg-this will give is a lovely shiny colour.

Bake at 180 degrees for approximately 40 minutes, or until the pastry is cooked at the top and bottom.

Serve with some Greek wine!


During the cold winter months our mind goes to hot, comforting food. Soups, stews, roasts. However, our bodies also crave foods that will sustain us. Eating raw foods is exactly what we need in January. Especially when it comes to foods that we have associated with something else.  What do we mean?

Think of beetroots. Or carrots. Usually we think of beetroots or carrots boiled or roasted. Served as salads or sides, or as part of a stew. Yes, we are used to eating these winter vegetables hot.

But what if we tried something different? Eating raw is good for the body. Add to this crunchy walnuts and sweet raisins. Eating this colourful, delicious salad is good for the soul too. Plus, needless to say, it really needs nothing but the vegetables, a knife and a cheese grater.

For 2 people you will need:

4 medium sized beetroot (approx. 400g)
2 small carrots
1 green apple
50g of walnuts
20g of raisins
3 tbls of olive oil (+link 22)
1 tbls aged balsamic vinegar
Pinch of sea salt

Peel and grate the beetroots, carrots and apple.  If you love different textures then grate the beetroot and cut the carrots and apple into various shapes and sizes: slices, cubes, whatever you fancy. If you also have beetroot leaves, finely slice them too. Mix all together.

Crush the walnuts and sprinkle over the salad. Add the raisins. In a small bowl whisk the olive oil, vinegar and sea salt. Pour over salad and serve.

Enjoy!


The New Year is here! The beginning of the year is usually the time when we make plans for the future. Away from the sparkle of the holidays past. In January, we promise ourselves that we will be better. That we will do better this year.

For that, we often turn to healthy food. To go with our resolutions. But we also need comfort food. After all, New Year’s resolutions can be challenging.

Good grains and pulses are what comes to mind when we think of good, comfort food. Today, we’ve selected for you a very interesting recipe. Leeks, sweet potatoes, and lentils all come together for a unique take on the (let’s be honest), sometimes boring lentil stew.

This warm and hearty soup is the perfect accompaniment for your new years resolution planning. And a tip for you: When serving, drizzle some aged balsamic vinegar on top. It makes all the difference in the world.

For 4 people

3 tbs extra virgin olive oil 

1 small leek
2 small sweet potatoes (approx. 250g)
1 clove of garlic, finely chopped
150gr lentils (+link if we have)
1.5 lt of vegetable stock
Salt and pepper
Bay leaf, thyme (optional)

To serve (optional):
Balsamic vinegar 
Fresh parsley

Peel the sweet potatoes and cut them in small cubes. Finely slice the leek. In a large saucepan, and over medium heat, pour the olive oil. Add the leaks and stir until soft and slightly caramelised. Add the garlic, sweet potatoes and lentils and still until covered in oil and well mixed. Add the vegetable stock. Season with salt and pepper and add the herbs (if using). Bring to the boil, then lower the heat and simmer until lentils are cooked through, adding more liquid if needed. Serve with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar and fresh parsley.