Rosehip has a warm, sweet and sour flavour and an astringent aftertaste. Its flowers smell like roses but have a lighter smell than the cultivated ones. The herb is used in cooking as herbal infusion, for syrup production as well as for baking and patisserie. Rich in seven vitamins, especially in C; when boiled, the vitamin attributes come out. If preparing an herbal infusion with whole rosehip, boil it for at least for 10 minutes.

This herb is known to have antibacterial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, astringent properties.  Rosehip’s medicinal qualities also include the following: reduces cholesterol levels in the blood, helps with osteoarthritis pain, acts as a body toner, strengthens the immune system, fights viruses and microbes . When made as a tea, it can prevent a common cold, induces sleep and is effective with urinary system problems.


Strongly aromatic and slightly bitter, absolutely essential to your Hummingbird cocktail, or for your pork or poultry stuffing. Or if you are of a more alternative persuasion, burning it cleans the negative energy from your environment.

Sage has remained a widely appreciated herb throughout the centuries due to its connection with wisdom and longevity and its therapeutic properties. Known since antiquity, it is depicted on the Minoan frescos in Knossos. Ancient Greeks used sage as a body and mind toner and in case of snake bites. To the Romans, it was considered a sacred herb, that was only collected by a designated person. It was so highly regarded by the Chinese in the 17th century, that Dutch merchants found the Chinese would exchange three chests of tea for one chest of sage leaves.

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