There is something really rewarding when you prepare yourself the foods that you usually get ready made from the supermarket. Think mayonnaise for example. Most of us get the commercial one. But think back at a time when supermarkets did not have mayonnaise. Think back at a time when households made their own.

I grew up with the supermarket one. Like most of us I guess. My mother did not. When I told her I am making mayonnaise this week, she told me her own stories. We did not make a lot, she said. Just the quantity we needed for every meal. We would have grilled fish and as the fish would cook, we would make mayonnaise. We used egg yolks and mustard. Lemon juice. And just olive oil, none of these oils you see now at recipes.

Indeed, researching recipes for mayonnaise, most use a mixture of olive oil and sunflower oil. The taste of mayonnaise made with other oils is milder. Olive oil is quite intense on its own. This is exactly why you have to make it just with olive oil. And with an olive oil with a robust, peppery flavour. Only then you can tell the difference between a mayonnaise that’s there just to brighten up your salad or crisps and a mayonnaise that you can’t stop eating with a spoon straight out of the jar (this is the writer’s own personal experience with this recipe here). This mayonnaise made with our 27C olive oil is like a velvety cloud when you taste it. But then, the acidity of the lemon and the richness of the olive oil kick in. And it’s a velvety cloud with sparkles. You can also try it with our 18C, for a more floral and grassy finish. Up to you really.

So go on, make your own. And maybe you’ll become like us, swapping the supermarket jar for this one.

In the recipe below, it’s important that all your ingredients are at room temperature and that you pour the olive oil very slowly. Imagine a thin string of olive oil. Or do half a teaspoon at a time until you feel confident enough to pour. And keep whisking until you get the silky texture you need.

Makes 1 jar

1 egg yolk
1 tsp mustard
juice of half a lemon, plus more to taste if needed
250ml of extra virgin olive oil
salt

Whisk the egg yolk and the mustard. Slowly add half of your oil, whisking constantly. Add the lemon juice, whisking constantly. Add the rest of your oil (you guessed it), whisking constantly. Taste and season with salt and more lemon if needed. Store in the fridge.


Have you ever made dough? If you have, you’ll know what we are talking about in this blog post. If you haven’t then let us introduce you to the magical word of putting a few ingredients together and creating something you thought was impossible.

Sure, like most things you can get ready made dough of your choosing from the grocery store. Do you need filo (phyllo) pastry for a spinach pie? The corner shop will have it. Do you need puff pastry for a bulgur pie ? Supermarket is next door.

But then you will be missing half the fun. You see, making dough is much easier than what you think. When we are talking dough, it all comes down to two things: ingredients and recipe. Dough usually has very few ingredients so as we’ve said in the past, make sure they are damn good. Get the good eggs. Get the slightly more expensive flour. Get the best you can afford. Now, when it comes to the recipe. That’s a tricky one. Internet these days is full of recipes. Bookstores are filled with cookery books. How does one choose which recipe to trust? Because we know first hand how horrible it is to put time and love into a recipe and it not giving you that love back. How does one find a recipe they trust? Here at Oliveology if there is one person we trust more than anyone it’s Mrs Kalliopi, Marianna’s mother. Remember her delicious Apple cake? Every week when we discuss future blog posts at Oliveology I nudge Marianna: call your mum, she has great recipes!

This time she shared with us her recipe for Kourou dough. This is a Greek dough that Mrs Kalliopi makes with olive oil and yogurt. The recipe came just as a list of ingredients and only the phrase: “make a soft and fluffy dough. Let it rest for 30min”. But worry not, we’ve deciphered it for you.

In Greece we usually make it into small pastries and fill them with feta and egg. But as you can imagine you can stuff it with whatever you wish: graviera or other hard cheese and bacon, tomatoes and a soft creamy white cheese like galotyri. Or you can even spread it and use it as a base for your pizza. This specific dough can actually stand on its own, so you can even roll it out and cut it in strips.

Ingredients 
500g  flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
230ml (1 cup) of extra virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons (30g) grated graviera cheese
200g greek yogurt
1 egg

Preheat your oven at 180C. Sieve your flour in a bowl and add the salt.

In a separate bowl whisk your egg. Add the olive oil and yogurt and stir until everything is combined. Add the cheese and stir again. Slowly pour your wet ingredients into your flour bowl. Use your hands until everything is combined. Place your dough in a lightly floured surface and kneed for a few minutes until you get (you guessed it) a soft and fluffy dough.

Let it rest for half an hour while you prepare your fillings or topping (if using any). Roll it and either stuff it, use it as a pizza base or cut in strips. Bake at 180C. Your dough will rise a bit, having a delicious slightly flaky texture. When you make it, drop us an email or tweet, Mrs Kalliopi would be thrilled.


A summer brunch might just be one of the most amazing ways to spend a hot, lazy Sunday. Even if you’ve had a late night on Saturday, it’s always good to gather with family, friends or flatmates and share food and coffee, slowly waking up together.

One of our favourite recipes for eggs is the one where the sweet tomatoes blend with eggs, creating a symphony of pure harmony. In Greece, this combination of flavours is often called Kagianas and resembles scrambled eggs mixed with tomatoes.

I first came across this dish in a cookery book for kids. A book with recipes from all over the world. I must have been in elementary school, I’m not sure, but this is one of the first cooking memories I have: Patiently waiting for the tomatoes to cook, then adding the eggs, sprinkling feta cheese on top (feta cheese was my addition). Then tasting for the first time the sweetness of tomatoes blending with the comfort of familiar eggs and the salty cheese. My childhood world of food would never be the same. I was mind blown.

This dish, with its many variations has followed me throughout the years. In my home now in London, the cousin of the Greek kagianas (or strapatsada), the well-known middle-eastern shakshouka eggs are most popular. So I encountered it again during our cooking workshop, when our guest chef Despoina prepared it for all of us who participated. The recipe below is inspired by that cooking class and the flavour combinations that Despoina put together.

So next Sunday, gather your family and friends and make with them these delicious eggs. Who knows, maybe you will create new memories.

For 2 people you will need:

3 tbsp of olive oil
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
2 large ripe tomatoes cut in cubes
½ tsp sweet smoked paprika
1tsp oregano
salt
pepper
4 eggs
6 sun dried tomatoes, very finely chopped

 
Over medium heat gently fry the onion until translucent. Add the tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper and add the paprika and half of the sun-dried tomatoes. Cook for 5-10min, until the sauce thickens a bit.

Add the oregano. Taste and adjust for seasoning. Create four holes with the back of your spoon and crack the eggs. Around the eggs, sprinkle the rest of the sun dried tomatoes. Place the lid on the pan for a few minutes. Once the eggs are cooked serve with crusty bread and iced black coffee.