This week we’re all into cooking. And we are getting ready for our cooking workshops this autumn! The first one is just for kids, at the end of October with the wonderful Amaryllis who makes cooking a fascinating experience for the little ones. And then there is our November one, for adults, with Lia who brings together her Welsh life and Greek heritage. We’ve also started planning our December one, full of Christmas recipes with a special guest chef-details soon to follow.

So yes, we do love cooking this week. And we’ve prepared a vibrant dressing for you. Dressings are our favourite things. They can turn any ingredient or dish into something you look forward to savouring. This one is made with yogurt! You see, we wanted to get a bit away from the vinaigrettes and create something creamy and comforting. Its secret ingredient is our smoked paprika! You can use this dressing in green salads, pour over roasted vegetables or make a delicious potato salad.

This quantity is enough for 6 side salads. You will need:

150g yogurt
1 tbsp mustard
5 tbsp olive oil
zest of 1 lemon
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tsp smoked paprika
3 tbsp water

In a bowl mix the yogurt and mustard. Add the lemon zest, juice and smoked paprika and mix well. Add the olive oil and stir, adding the water one tablespoon at a time so that you have the texture you want. If you want the dressing to be more runny then add a bit more water, one tablespoon at a time.


With autumn in its full swing, this week we’ve got something to warm you up and sweeten your mood. Our inspiration came from our succulent figs, one of our products of the month.

These wonderful figs are carefully selected and hand picked. Then they are dried naturally under the Greek sun, with no additives or preservatives. The figs are harvested from the fertile Messinia region in the Peloponnese, which we love.

Searching for recipe ideas with dried figs we decided to go for something we haven’t tried before. A compote. The idea came from our vegan stuffing recipe with raisins. While cooking up the recipe, the raisins soaked up all the juices and got rehydrated. What would happen to our figs in a similar situation? Let’s see, shall we?

For this recipe here we did not use any sugar. Just a combination of spices and fig molasses! It is dried figs that we want to liven up, what better pairing than fig molasses? In full disclosure, we had some leftover from our summer granola and dressing recipe. And there’s nothing more this writer loves most than no-waste cooking. And speaking of no-waste cooking have a look at our cooking class this November. We will learn a lot about no-waste there too!

For 1 jar you will need

300ml water
2tbsp fig molasses
250g figs
1/4tsp cardamom
1 cinnamon stick
25g whole raw sesame
Greek yogurt (to serve)

Place all your ingredients in a medium-sized pot over medium-high heat. As soon as bubbles start to form, turn down the heat and cook on low for 30-40min, until the figs are tender and the liquid has caramelized.

Fig compote is great served warm, as is or over Greek yogurt.


Autumn is here! Usually at this time of year many of us are struggling to leave summer behind. All of us at Oliveology found that the best way to change seasons is to make foods that will make us excited about what’s ahead.

This week we are using the last grapes that we find at the market and some lovely pears that are now beginning to come. If you prefer you can use just grapes or just pears. Or create your own flavour combinations!

But we are not making a sweet tart. We are pairing sweet fruit with our organic feta cheese. And some Greek yogurt! Remember our leftovers tart from a few months back? Or our colourful squash tart from last year?  This lays somewhere in between!

We’ve also added some walnuts. Some fragrant thyme honey and our 21 walnut oil drizzled on top takes this tart into a whole other level. It is perfect with a green salad as a main, or you can cut it into small pieces and serve it at a buffet.

Feeds 4 as main

1 sheet puff pastry (approx. 300g)
150g yogurt
100g feta cheese, grated
2 small pears
150g grapes
25g walnuts
a few springs of fresh thyme
wild thyme honey (to serve)
21 walnut oil (to serve)

Preheat your oven to 180C.

Roll out your puff pastry and place it on a baking sheet. You can use greaseproof paper, or make sure to oil the baking sheet so that your tart doesn’t stick to the bottom.
Using a fork, pierce the puff pastry across all of its surface. Put the puff pastry in the oven and bake for 5 min, until light golden. Remove from the oven and let it cool. Leave the oven on.

In the meantime, finely slice your pears, removing any seeds. Slice each grape in half. Chop your walnuts. Pick the leaves from the thyme and discard the stalks.

Spread your yogurt on top of the puff pastry, so that it covers its entire surface. Sprinkle the grated feta cheese. Make sure it goes everywhere. Place your pears and grapes on top. Sprinkle the walnuts and dried thyme.

Place the tart back in the oven and bake for 20-25min or until the cheese has melted and the fruit is soft. Your puff pastry should be dark gold. Remove from the oven. You can serve warm, but it’s equally good at room temperature.

Before serving drizzle some thyme honey and the walnut oil.


We rarely make cookies here at Oliveology’s blog. I have to admit, I personally am more of a cook and less of a baker. Those of you cooking passionately will smile, as indeed baking is a whole different world than cooking. But that doesn’t mean that when we do bake we don’t enjoy it! The spiced molasses cookies that we made during the holidays last year filled our shop with winter spices. Over the years all of us cooking for Oliveology have made some delicious seasonal cakes, like last autumn’s butternut squash cake, and some less ordinary ones such as the olive oil apple cake or the no-sugar grape molasses cake!

In the beginning of this summer, for reasons unknown, I started baking cookies. I discovered that baking cookies after a long day can actually be quite relaxing. So this week, inspired by our product of the month, the Corinth raisins and Honey &Co’s recipes, we have a very fun and ‘relaxing’ recipe for you!

Our Corinth raisins are small in size, but punch above their weight in terms of their sweetness and taste. They do lay somewhere between fudge and chocolate if you ask me. I can’t think of a better ingredient for these cookies. And as always, there’s a twist: tahini! Its nuttiness adds depth –and as we are using less butter, we like to feel that these are ‘healthier’ cookies.

If any of you feel like experimenting and substituting all of the butter in this recipe for the tahini, please drop us a line. I am very curious if it will work. And for more healthier-living ideas, recipes and of course fun, join our workshops this year! Delicious collaborations are here and spaces are filling fast!

For 16 cookies you will need:

140g butter
200g dark muscovado sugar
1 egg
110g tahini
150g all purpose flour
100g wholemeal flour
½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
100g Corinth raisins

Cream the butter and sugar together. Add the egg and tahini and mix well. In a separate bowl sieve all your dry ingredients: flours, baking soda, baking powder. Using a wooden spoon slowly fold everything together. Add the raisins. Be careful not to overmix.

Now, some people say that the beauty in baking cookies is tasting the uncooked dough. We are those people. But if you are hesitant about raw eggs please don’t.

Place your cookie dough in the fridge for half an hour. Form your cookies and place them in a baking tray that you have covered in greaseproof paper. Make sure there is enough space between them as they will flatten.

Bake at 180C for 10-15 minutes, or a tiny bit more if you prefer them crunchy!

Enjoy with some warm milk sweetened with grape molasses.