As you may know, Greek cuisine is all about seasonality. So when summer comes along, we can’t but cook with the produce of the season. Aubergines, courgettes, peppers, tomatoes are all in abundance and at their best during this time of the year. Remember our stuffed peppers with bulgur wheat, or our friend Amaryllis’ stuffed peppers with orzo?

In the spirit of Greek summer, briam is perhaps one of the most loved Greek dishes! It is very easy to make and makes use of all these delicious vegetables. As with most summer foods it is great eaten at room temperature or even cold. In the classic recipe, the vegetables are slowly cooked in the oven, along with crushed tomatoes and plenty of olive oil. The result is a mellow, delicious dish that you can keep in your fridge for when you need an easy supper or lunch. In our version of this dish, we’ve used a few sun-dried tomatoes and their oil which adds depth and flavour. You can add a bit of grape molasses too if you wish!

This dish is great with feta cheese, which we’ve added towards the end of cooking, but you can omit this if you are vegan.

Serves 6

2 aubergines (700g)
2 courgettes (700g)
1 green bell pepper
2 potatoes (400g)
2 onions
3 cloves of garlic
20g sun-dried tomatoes (or more, to taste)
1 tbsp tomato paste in 150ml warm water
2 bottles of tomato passata or 6-8 tomatoes, crushed
150ml olive oil plus more for drizzling
Salt, pepper (to taste)
150g feta cheese
a small bunch of parsley, leaves only, roughly chopped

Preheat the oven at 180C.
Cut the aubergines, courgettes, peppers and potatoes in large bite-sized pieces. Cut the onion in half moons and finely slice the garlic. Finely chop the sun-dried tomatoes.
Place all your vegetables in a a large baking tray.
In a mug, mix together the tomato paste and warm water and stir with a spoon until the tomato paste is dissolved. Add it to your tray.
Also add the crushed tomatoes, olive oil and plenty of salt and pepper. Mix everything together. The tomatoes should just about cover your vegetables.
Cover with tinfoil and bake in the oven for an hour.
Remove the tinfoil, add the feta cheese crumbled, parsley and drizzle with a bit more olive oil, and bake for another half hour or more, until the potatoes are soft and the tomatoes have turned into a mellow sauce.

Serve with crusty bread!


On the 16th of July we celebrated our 12th Birthday!

Oliveology was founded in 2009 as a means of sharing   the culinary treasures and gastronomic traditions of Greece. From our modest beginnings as a little stall in Borough Market, we’ve grown to have a lovely shop at Three Crown Square and a railway arch at Spa Terminus in Bermondsey hosting a second shop, our own professional kitchen, and an events space.

We would like to thank all of you for becoming part of our Oliveology family over the years: our inspiring artisanal producers, beloved customers, loyal staff, past and present.

This last year was particularly challenging for us all, but we managed to keep strong because of all the love and support we received from you, our customers. As the world was closing in, communication with you in our shops, on our social media outlets and during our virtual workshops helped us feel so close to you all and gave us the support we needed to overcome the challenges we were facing.

We look forward to this summer, the time of the year when Marianna, our founder, and her family travel back to Greece, in search of new, exciting ingredients and foods to bring back for us. It is not only about discovering new tastes and flavours, but also about building strong, long-lasting relationships with those who produce the food we put on our table.

This year we also couldn’t be more thrilled to have new members joining our Oliveology team (including little Harry!), both at Borough Market and at our offices and warehouse space in Bermondsey. Pop by and say hi to them!

As we blow the candles on our 12th birthday cake (made with olive oil, of course!), we only feel optimistic about the future. We are excited to have launched our delicious Greek dips range and many culinary experiences, including our Oliveology holidays. Check out our autumn 2021 events, including exclusive wine tastings where you can learn all there is to know about Greek wine. We are also very happy to be planning more surprises for you: think of wholesome, cooked meals from our professional kitchen coming your way and the subscription boxes that many of you have asked for. These are just a few of the things we have planned for the future.

We look forward to many more years ahead, sharing our passion for quality, flavourful, nutritious foods that reflect our values and dreams for a more sustainable and fair world.

Thank you for being part of our journey so far, and for your immense love and support!


This week we’re really wishing we were on a Greek island, laying on the beach, having dinners by the sea, tasting all these delicious local delicacies Greek islands have to offer. So today’s recipe comes from the island of Kimolos. It lays somewhere between a deep dish pizza and a focaccia. But with no cheese and plenty of olive oil! It is perfect for this time of the year, when tomatoes are juicy and ripe. It is also a great addition to your barbecue or outdoor picnic.

For this recipe, you need an intense, robust olive oil, so we used our Ergani organic extra virgin olive oil. It is a classic olive oil made from ripe olives, produced on a small organic family farm in the Messinia region of the Peloponnese. This versatile olive oil has a full, traditionally rich flavour and tones of cut grass, fantastic for everyday use, and baking.

Serves 6

100ml (1/2 cup) warm water (not boiling)
50ml olive oil
1 sachet dried yeast (8gr)
1 tbsp sugar
1tsp salt
200g all-purpose flour

3 medium tomatoes
1 large red onion
2tsp dried oregano
4 tbsp olive oil+ 4tbsp for the pan
salt, pepper

In a large bowl place the warm water, olive oil sugar and yeast and stir to dissolve. Let it stand for 5 minutes until small bubbles start to form. Add the flour and mix until all the ingredients come together. Knead your dough for 7-10 minutes until smooth. Add a bit more flour if needed. Place your dough back in the bowl, dusting some flour at the bottom so that it doesn’t stick. Let it rest for an hour in a warm place. It should double in size.

In the meantime, preheat the oven at 200C.
Roughly chop the tomatoes and onions and place in a bowl with 4tbsp olive oil, salt pepper and oregano. Toss everything together and set aside.

Oil your baking tray (which, traditionally is rectangular) with 4 tbsp of olive oil and using your fingers, spread out your dough. Place the tomatoes and onions on top, but leave any liquid in the bowl.
(*you can actually eat it with a spoon it’s delicious!)

Drizzle a bit more olive oil and bake at 200C for around 40-45 minutes. You should have an airy dough, moist on top and crunchy at the bottom. Let it cool and serve.

 


Our recipe this week comes from the island of Sifnos. Melopita is a cake made with honey and anthotyro cheese, a soft white cheese resembling ricotta. On the island of Sifnos, as we learn in this video, it is is traditionally made during Easter, when households had anthotyro cheese around. Today of course we do have access to such cheeses all-year round, but it’s always interesting to see how seasonality is present in things one would least expect, like a dessert cake.

As you may know if you’re following this blog, when it comes to traditional Greek recipes, there are as many recipes as there are cooks. The one we have for you here is slightly adapted from Mrs Maria’s in the video, adding just a bit more anthotyro cheese and a few pinches of salt to bring out the honey’s sweetness. It somewhat reminds us of a honey cheesecake, but the texture is lighter and the flavour of honey is much more intense. We used wild thyme honey, a monofloral nectar honey from predominantly wild thyme flowers, as it’s both the honey used in Sifnos, but also one of our favourite ones!

Serves 6

650gr anthotyro cheese (you can replace it with any other soft white cheese like ricotta, or email us and we can order some for you)
250gr wild thyme honey
5 eggs
150g sugar
a few pinches of salt
2 tbsp olive oil
50gr semolina

Preheat your oven at 180C

In a large bowl, roughly mix the cheese, honey, eggs, sugar and salt with a fork. Using a food processor, blend the mixture in batches until smooth. If you have a large food processor, you can skip the bowl and simply add all the ingredients in the food processor. You should be left with a silky batter, slightly looser than cake batter.

Grease a large baking tray (we used a 30cm one) with the olive oil and add the semolina, so that the bottom and sides are covered. Pour in your batter. Your cake should be quite thin, around 2.5cm tall.

Bake for around 40 minutes, or until your cake is no longer wobbly. Serve cold.