Ladolemonο, literally meaning olive oil and lemon, is perhaps the most classic Greek dressing. You can find it in many tavernas and households, as most Greeks love the taste of olive oil and lemon. As with most dressings, this can be used in a variety of dishes, for instance in green salads or poured over roasted vegetables.

But our favourite way to use ladolemono is alongside fish. But not any fish. In Greek cooking, fish is often prepared-and consumed whole, and ladolemono is served on the side, so that each person can pour the desired amount on their plates. Often, when ladolemono is served with fish, the lemon rinds are kept to clean the fish odour from the plates, after the meal is over. A truly no-waste recipe!

As this is a dressing without many ingredients, choose your olive oil and lemons carefully. Get the best you can afford. We recommend using our 18 olive oil. This exceptional oil is the first olive oil of the season, made from unripe olives when they are still small and green. It is a truly superior olive oil with a smooth, silky texture and warm, fruity and peppery aromas, which is perfect for this recipe.

Serves 2

4 tbsp lemon juice (from one lemon)
8 tbsp olive oil (plus more, to taste)
salt, to taste

Place the lemon juice in a bowl. Slowly pour in the olive oil and whisk together until emulsified. Season with salt.

There’s quite a bit of lemon in this dressing, so if you prefer a more subtle lemon flavour, then add a bit more olive oil, around 4 tbsp more.


This week we’ve got a classic Greek winter recipe for you. Lahanorizo, literally meaning cabbage-rice, is perhaps one of the most comforting dishes in Greek cuisine. It is made with slowly cooked cabbage, carrots and rice, and served with plenty of olive oil and lemon. This mellow vegan stew is a classic in Greek households. It is only made in the winter, as soon as the first cabbages appear at the market.

For this recipe you need rice that’s high in starch, so we’ve used our Carolina rice. It is organic and comes from a small cooperative in the area of Grevena in the northern part of Greece.

This dish is perfect served hot, but also makes for an excellent lunch the following day, served at room temperature.

Serves 6 with leftovers
3 onions
6 tbsp olive oil (plus more, to serve)
1 cabbage, around 1.2kg
4 large carrots
200g Carolina rice
salt, to taste
a small bunch of parsley
lemon juice (to serve)

Finely chop the onions. Place the onions in a large pot with the olive oil and gently fry over medium heat, until translucent but not caramelised.

Shred the cabbage and grate the carrots. Add to your pot with one cup of water and cook until the cabbage is wilted, around 15 minutes. Add the rice and 3 cups of water, and season with salt. Cover the pot and cook until the rice is cooked through and the vegetables are soft, around 30 min.

Finely chop the parsley and add to your pot. Stir and let it cook for another 5 minutes.

Serve with plenty of lemon juice and more olive oil.


As you know, trahana is one of our favourite winter foods. It makes for a hearty, nutritious soup with spiced peppers, can become a luxurious dish with the addition of truffles, or a very unique breakfast with olive oil, cheese & honey. You can also use it to make a creamy soup, or add to your stews for texture.

What it is? It is a mixture of fermented milk and wheat, with a slightly tangy flavour and a very comforting smell! A classic in Greek cuisine.

So this week, as we are preparing for our Winter Rural Feast in December, plan wine tastings for the months ahead and many other culinary experiences for you all (check this space!), we couldn’t but make a nutritious breakfast.

This week we’ve cooked trahana in milk (you can use hazelnut milk or any other milk of your choice), and added our absolute favourite: smooth hazelnut butter! Made purely from organic, raw hazelnuts, with no added salt or any preservatives, it is the ideal way to get all the nutrients from nuts. Add some honey and you’ve got yourselves a breakfast that can get you through any challenging winter day!

Serves 1

75g trahana
250g milk of your choice
1 tsp hazelnut butter
1 tsp raw hazelnuts, roughly chopped
1-2 dried figs, roughly chopped
1 tsp honey, plus more for serving

In a small pot add the trahana and your milk. Over medium heat bring it to a simmer, then lower the heat to its lowest setting. Let it cook, stirring often (otherwise it will stick to the bottom of the pot), for 15- 20 minutes, until trahana is soft and you have a porridge-like texture. You may need to add a bit more milk to loosen it up.

Add the hazelnut butter and honey and give it a swirl. Top with the chopped hazelnuts and dried figs and more honey if desired.


A few weeks back, a delicious dip was brought to us by a small cheeseroom in Kozani, Northern Greece. This is Riganati, they told us. Rigani is the Greek name for oregano, so we immediately knew that we would love it, as we love all-things oregano. The dip, made with creamy feta cheese, olive oil and oregano brought back many childhood memories of my grandmother. Whenever we had lunch at her house she would take a piece of feta cheese, crumble it with her fork, then pour over some olive oil and sprinkle some oregano. She would mash up everything together and we would have it with crusty bread.

So from my grandmother’s table and Northern Greece, this is our own version for this delicious dip, which you can serve as is, or dilute it with a bit of milk and pour over pasta or roasted vegetables (yes, broccoli loves this!).

For this, we used our organic feta cheese, a classic Greek feta cheese made from organic sheep’s and goats’ milk, in the Peloponnese. It is a bright cheese, soft in the mouth with a buttery and slightly peppery aftertaste, perfect for this dish. Also awarded PDO status! But you can use a more mature feta cheese if you prefer, for a more complex flavour.

Serves 5

250g feta cheese
125g milk
2tsp olive oil (plus more for serving)
Ground oregano (to taste)

In a small saucepan, heat up the milk until warm but not boiling. In a food processor add the feta cheese, olive oil and the warm milk and blend everything together until smooth. Add a few pinches of ground oregano, blend everything together again. Taste and add more oregano if needed.

This will set in the fridge but you can dilute it with a bit more milk if desired. Serve with plenty of olive oil and crusty bread.