Valentine’s Day on February 14th is usually associated with romantic love. For us here at Oliveology it is indeed a day of love. Love is not only for lovers, but also for friends, family, yourself. It is also the day to indulge in the pleasures of eating-and cooking for that matter.

So this week we have prepared a recipe for you, using one of our very special ingredients! Black. Truffle. Sauce.

Our truffle sauce is made of champignon mushrooms, blended with black summer truffle, extra virgin olive oil, salt and spices. Each jar contains 10% of truffle, so the aroma is quite intense. You can use this sauce in various dishes, stir into warm pasta, add on omelettes or mix with cream for a delicious sauce. My personal favourite is simply spreading it on warm toast, with fresh herbs on top. Add a poached egg and you’ve got yourselves the most luxurious breakfast -or dinner for that matter!

But back to this week’s recipe. It is possibly the simplest way to use this delicious ingredient. Apart from simply spreading on toast, that is. You can swap orzo for rice, and if you want to complicate it a bit more, use vegetable stock instead of water. But for us, this version is ideal.

Serves two

1 medium red onion
2tbsp olive oil
150g orzo
½ jar black truffle sauce
300ml water
salt pepper
30g kefalotyri cheese, finely grated
springs of thyme (to serve)

Finely slice the onion. In a medium sized dish and over medium-high heat gently fry the onion in the olive oil until translucent and slightly caramelised. Add the orzo and stir until covered in the remaining oil and well mixed.

Add half of the truffle sauce and stir again.

Add the 300ml of water, season with salt and pepper and let it cook, half covered until orzo is al dente.

Remove from the heat, add the cheese and stir, adding a few splashes of water if needed.

Serve with the remaining black truffle sauce and fresh thyme.


Leftovers can be the best and the worst part of a festive meal. Yes, let’s be honest, after a couple of days of luscious Christmas food, returning home to reheated turkey or mash doesn’t sound very appealing. But if Christmas is the time of the year to be merry and bright, then the days after Christmas are there to get us ready for the New Year.

This week is for us to reflect on the year ending and the new one beginning. And of course to sort out all the leftovers from the last few days. We’re here to inspire you for both.

Below is a recipe for leftover potatoes. But not only that. It is also something to inspire you to be different in the new year. To not waste food. To treat leftovers with care and see them transform. To begin 2017 with a new, no-waste philosophy.

But we wouldn’t want you to eat dry old potatoes. We want you to turn these potatoes into a new dish. To not waste anything and at the same time enjoy the food that you create. For this recipe you can use any potatoes you’ve got. Roasted, boiled, already mashed. Take them out of the fridge, gather the few ingredients listed below and get ready to be amazed.

We will use truffle butter to transform humble leftovers into yet another festive dish. With real truffle pieces inside, this butter is so aromatic that only a couple of teaspoons work wonders.

Truffle Butter Potato Croquettes
(For 2-3 people)

350g potatoes, mashed
3 eggs
30g of truffle butter, melted under gentle heat
30g flour
Salt and pepper to taste
A cup of breadcrumbs
Extra virgin olive oil for frying

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Truffles are a subterranean fungi; among the most expensive natural foods and according to the famous French gastronome Brillat-Savarin, the “Diamonds of the Kitchen.”

Truffles are formed underground on the root of the symbiotic plant -mainly some forest species like hornbeams, hazels, pines, poplars, oaks, willows and lime trees. They have a round, irregular form, and their size varies between the size of a pea and that of an orange and, can only be found by specially trained dogs and pigs. Their exorbitant price is justified because of the limited supply, availability only at certain times of the year and, notoriously difficult cultivation.

These mushrooms have been used as delicacies, as aphrodisiacs and as medicines. Truffles are mainly water, with the remaining weight comprising several types of minerals and organic substances such as calcium, potassium and magnesium. Its gastronomical and nutritive merits make this fungus as one of the most exquisite dishes worldwide. With very high protein content, it is also believed that it has healing properties against muscular pains and arthritis and that it lowers  cholesterol levels. Also, it is considered to have powerful aphrodisiac properties. Continue reading →