This month, we begin Lent with taramosalata, as we give a warm embrace to the women who have guided us into becoming who we are. We also cook for Ukraine.

There is always great complexity in the making of any nation and its identity, and we will always be compassionate to others. People carry their own histories and stories and we must respect and care for all. But one thing is clear: we stand against warfare.

We support Alissa Timoshkina and Olia Hercules in #CookForUkraine with a recipe that felt close to our hearts. This split pea & bread soup (kuleshnyk) is adapted from Olia’s book “Summer Kitchens: Recipes and reminiscences from every corner of Ukraine”. We loved adding more olive oil and swapping the bread with dakos rusks. We hope you enjoy making it and find solace in its comforting smell.

This hearty stew, which we shared with our loved ones, is a reminder that living in peace is something to be celebrated. So join us as we cook together, get involved in ways that feel close to our hearts, and hope for freedom, justice, democracy and peace in the world around us. Read more in this week’s newsletter and follow this link to learn more about Cook For Ukraine and how to donate.

Serves 4-6

2 medium onions
1 large carrot
1 large parsnip
4 cloves of garlic
2tbsp olive oil, plus more for serving
2tbsp tomato paste
Dried thyme (to taste)
200g fava (split yellow peas)
100g dakos rusks
Dried oregano (to serve)

Peel and dice the onions, carrot and parsnips. Finely slice the garlic. In a medium-sized saucepan and over medium heat add the olive oil and your vegetables, but not the garlic. Season with salt and pepper and cook until tender and caramelised, around 20 minutes. Add a splash of water if needed.

Once your vegetables are caramelised, add the garlic and cook for two-three minutes. Add the tomato paste and thyme, and cook for 5 more minutes. Add the fava and 2lt of water. Bring it to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer, until the fava is cooked and the vegetables are tender, for an hour or so.

Crush the dakos rusks and add them to your pot. Cook for 5 more minutes. Serve with oregano and plenty of olive oil.


After what felt like a lifetime of January, February is here. With only 28 days this year, we will soon be heading onto spring. As the days become longer and the light appears a little bit more often, we thought we’d spend February preparing wholesome winter meals. Soup of course is on the menu, but not any soup.

This week we have prepared a simple leek and potato soup, but with the wonderful addition of yoghurt. The idea came to us after discovering a recipe for a potato soup with yoghurt in an old recipe book with Greek vegetarian food by Jack Santa Maria. So if you, like us, are looking for new, inspiring ways to incorporate Greek yoghurt into your diets, this hearty soup is for you! Don’t forget to check out our other delicious soups.

You can use one of our flavoured oils to serve this soup. We particularly loved our Apple Oil here, but also our 17C olive oil, with lemons, oranges and thyme.

Serves 4

2 potatoes (500g)
2 leeks (500g)
1/4 cup olive oil, plus more to serve
1/4 tsp dried thyme
1/4 tsp dried oregano
200g Greek yoghurt, plus more, to serve
1.2 lt water or vegetable stock
salt, pepper
a small bunch of fresh dill and your favourite flavoured olive oil (to serve)

Peel the potatoes and cut in bite-sized pieces. Trim and roughly slice the leeks.

In a medium-sized pot, and over medium heat add the olive oil and leeks. Gently cook until tender but not caramelised. Add the potatoes, thyme, oregano and stir until coated with the olive oil.

Add the yoghurt, along with the water. Season with salt and pepper and stir everything together. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and cook for around 30min, until the potatoes are tender, adding a bit more water/stock if needed.

Blend everything together, and serve this creamy soup with more yoghurt, your favourite olive oil, and plenty of dill.


Briam is our favourite summer food. Aubergines, courgettes, potatoes and onions slowly cook in the oven, along with crushed tomatoes and plenty of olive oil. The result is tender vegetables that melt in your mouth. The classic recipe is only made during the summer. Growing up, we never had a winter version of briam at home.

However, when looking around for culinary inspiration, I realised that in the last few years a winter version has indeed appeared, with sweet potatoes, beetroot and other winter vegetables.

As we love eating vegetables that are in season, we couldn’t but try this one! How does it differ to roasted vegetables? This Winter Briam keeps the same principles as the summer much-loved dish: vegetables slowly cook in the oven, this time with honey, mustard and orange or lemon juice to replace the tomatoes. Olive oil is always there, of course. The result is not caramelised vegetables or vegetables that keep their bite. The result is a mellow, colourful dish with soft and tender vegetables that melt in your mouth.

Make a large tray, it’s great for lunch the next day. Actually it keeps well for the week, so you can have it for lunch every day!

Serves 6 as a main

2 large carrots (approx. 300g)
2 sweet potatoes (approx. 300g)
4-5 beetroot (approx. 500g)
1 medium broccoli (approx.. 200g)
1 leek
2 medium onions
½ head of garlic
1 tsp dried spearmint
1 tsp dried rosemary
1 tsp dried thyme
200ml olive oil
50ml water
1 tbsp wild thyme honey
1 large orange, juice and zest
2 tbsp mustard
1 small bunch of parsley (to serve, optional)
Feta cheese (to serve, optional)

Preheat the oven at 180C.

Peel and cut the carrots and sweet potatoes in bite-sized pieces. Trim the beetroot and cut in quarters or in half. Leave small beetroot whole. Cut the broccoli in florets.
Finely slice the leek. Peel and cut the onions in wedges.
Place all vegetables in a large baking tray and sprinkle with the dried herbs.
In a mug whisk together the olive oil, water, honey, orange juice and zest and mustard. Pour over your vegetables and mix everything together.

Cover in tinfoil and bake for one hour covered. Uncover and bake for half an hour.Finely chop the parsley and add to the tray. Serve with plenty of feta cheese.

 


If you’ve been following our recipes for a while, you must know by now how much we love traditional Greek recipes, and recipes that are inspired by Greek tradition. We also love our chickpeas –revithada is one of our most popular recipes!

Our chickpeas are harvested every year in organic farms in northern Greece. You can use them to make the traditional revithada soup, or a hearty spiced chickpea stew. Create more filling salads and of course, make your own hummus with our nutty tahini.

Today, we are using chickpeas in a classic Greek combination: slowly cooked with Greens and lemon. For this one, you can use whatever seasonal greens you prefer: chard, kale, spinach, wild greens. If you go for spinach, avoid the baby spinach and select the large leaves, as these are more flavourful and add texture to your dish. Also check out these chickpeas with greens and tomatoes!

Serves 2 with leftovers

200g chickpeas
2 medium onions
2 cloves of garlic
100ml olive oil, plus more for serving
200g seasonal greens (chard, kale, spinach, wild greens etc)
1 lemon, juice and zest (divided)
2 tsp spearmint

The night before soak the chickpeas in plenty of water. The morning after drain and place in a medium-sized pot with 2lt of water. Boil until tender but not mushy, around 1-1.5 hours. Drain, reserving ½ cup of the cooking liquid.

Preheat the oven at 180C.

Peel the onions, cut in half and then finely slice (half-moons).
Grate the garlic.
In a medium-sized frying pan add the olive oil, onions and garlic and gently cook over medium-low hear, until tender and slightly caramelised.

Roughly chop your greens.

In a medium-sized baking dish add the cooked chickpeas, onions, garlic and olive oil, greens, lemon zest, spearmint and the chickpea cooking liquid. Cover with tinfoil and cook in the oven for 40min.

Serve with the lemon juice and more olive oil.


Lentil soup is a classic Greek dish. Every Greek household has its own version. My mother makes it in its simplest form, simply boiling lentils with plenty of garlic. Marianna’s mother adds onions, carrots and celery (and it is this recipe that we have for you today). But no matter what vegetables one chooses for this soup, there is one ingredient that all Greek lentil soups include: bay leaves. These fragrant leaves give a unique aroma, with complex herbal and slightly floral notes. They turn our lentils into a truly comforting meal. Our bay leaves are organic and wild, and hand picked from the mountains of Epirus, in North West Greece.

We’re serving this soup with our 18 extra virgin olive oil (surprisingly our apple oil works great here!) and plenty of vinegar. It is great eaten hot, but keeps well, so it also makes for a great lunch the following day.

Serves 10

150ml olive oil
2 onions
4-5 medium carrots
2 sticks of celery
2 tbsp tomato puree
1kg lentils
4 garlic cloves (plus more if you love garlic)
2-3 bay leaves
5lt water or vegetable stock
salt, pepper (to taste)
18C olive oil (to serve)
red wine vinegar (to serve)

Finely chop your onion, carrot and celery stick. Peel the garlic and leave whole.

In a medium-sized pot add the chopped vegetables and garlic, along with the olive oil. Gently cook over medium heat for a few minutes until tender. Add the tomato puree and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Add the lentils, bay leaves and water or stock.

Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and then lower the heat to medium. Cook for 45 minutes, until the lentils are tender.

Serve hot, with more olive oil and plenty of vinegar.

 


When it comes to salads and Greek cuisine, the well-known Greek salad is always eaten during the summer. As Greek food is all about seasonality, during winter we switch to what we call the “cabbage-carrot salad”. It is a crunchy and fresh salad made with shredded cabbage and grated carrot, usually dressed with olive oil and lemon. So this week we’ve created a twist to this classic winter dish.

This salad is perfect to feed a crowd and also keeps well in the fridge for a few hours. So you can make it in advance and then simply serve it at dinnertime. It’s also our go-to salad for Christmas, as the combination of sweet Corinth raisins and aniseed Kalamata olives with ouzo always surprises our guests.

Serves 2 as a main or 4 as a side

¼ -1/2 cabbage head (around 300g)
2 carrots
2 celery sticks
2 roasted red peppers
40g Corinth raisins
½ tub ouzo olives
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
2 tbsp olive oil

Shred the cabbage in a large bowl. Grate in the carrots.

Finely slice the celery and roasted peppers and add them to your bowl. Add the raisins and olives.

Toss everything together. Drizzle with the olive oil and vinegar and toss again.

The salad can be prepared in advance and keeps well in the fridge for a few hours.
Serve with more olive oil and vinegar if desired.


This week we’ve got a classic Greek winter recipe for you. Lahanorizo, literally meaning cabbage-rice, is perhaps one of the most comforting dishes in Greek cuisine. It is made with slowly cooked cabbage, carrots and rice, and served with plenty of olive oil and lemon. This mellow vegan stew is a classic in Greek households. It is only made in the winter, as soon as the first cabbages appear at the market.

For this recipe you need rice that’s high in starch, so we’ve used our Carolina rice. It is organic and comes from a small cooperative in the area of Grevena in the northern part of Greece.

This dish is perfect served hot, but also makes for an excellent lunch the following day, served at room temperature.

Serves 6 with leftovers
3 onions
6 tbsp olive oil (plus more, to serve)
1 cabbage, around 1.2kg
4 large carrots
200g Carolina rice
salt, to taste
a small bunch of parsley
lemon juice (to serve)

Finely chop the onions. Place the onions in a large pot with the olive oil and gently fry over medium heat, until translucent but not caramelised.

Shred the cabbage and grate the carrots. Add to your pot with one cup of water and cook until the cabbage is wilted, around 15 minutes. Add the rice and 3 cups of water, and season with salt. Cover the pot and cook until the rice is cooked through and the vegetables are soft, around 30 min.

Finely chop the parsley and add to your pot. Stir and let it cook for another 5 minutes.

Serve with plenty of lemon juice and more olive oil.


Today is tsiknopempth! It is the Thursday very close to the beginning of Lent for the Greek Orthodox Easter, where traditionally we consume meat. And if you’ve ever been to Greece you will know that one of the few things that go perfectly with meat are pies!

Traditionally, pies were peasant dishes, in which people would use literally whatever they had available. Greens from the garden (spanakopita!), cheese from their animals (like in this bulgur wheat pie), you get the idea. But of course, they are quite sophisticated dishes, as they can be elaborate in their making, this is why they are usually made in large trays. But fear not, this is a simple recipe, open to all! It will require some time, so consider this a Sunday affair. Or you know, make it any other day of the week, days seems to have blended into one now that we are in lockdown.

For this one we’ve used the last pumpkins of the season, a very appropriate goodbye to one of our favourite autumn/winter vegetables -yes we are now ready for wild garlic, bring it on, spring!

Serves 12

1.5 kg pumpkin (around 1.350gr flesh)
1 large onion
4 tbsp olive oil
salt, pepper (to taste)
85g Carolina rice
250g feta cheese, grated or crumbled
1tsp dried spearmint
2 eggs
8 sheets filo pastry
150g olive oil

Using a sharp knife, cut your pumpkin into smaller pieces. Peel the outer layer. Using a spoon, scoop out the seeds. Coarsely grate the flesh.

Peel and finely chop the onion.

In a medium-sized pot, place the olive oil and onion over medium heat. Cook until caramelised, about 5-10 minutes.

Add the pumpkin and stir well. Season with salt and pepper (but do not add too much salt, as you’ll be adding the salty feta cheese afterwards). Once the pumpkin starts cooking, lower the heat and slowly cook, stirring often for 15 minutes, until soft and tender. Add the rice, stir, and cook for another 20-25 minutes, stirring often.
-Yes, this is a recipe that requires care. But it’s also very relaxing as a process.

You will know that your filling is ready, once the pumpkin is soft and the rice is al dente but not fully cooked. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

Preheat the oven at 180C.

In the meantime, prepare your filo. Brush your baking tray with olive oil and place one sheet of the filo. Brush with olive oil again. Cross over a second sheet of filo, ensuring that the entire surface of your tray is covered. Brush with olive oil. Continue crossing over with olive oil and filo, using four sheets in total.

Return to the filling. In the cool pumpkin mixture, add the spearmint, feta cheese and eggs and mix everything together. Check for seasoning and adjust. Place the filling in your tray, careful not to break the filo.

Cover with one sheet of filo and brush it with olive oil. Repeat until the top is covered with four sheets of filo. Tuck in the edges. Brush the top with the remaining olive oil.

Score the pie and bake at 180C at the lower rack of your oven for about one hour.

Enjoy!


The inspiration for this recipe came to us from the classic Greek winter salad: boiled broccoli and cauliflower. This is a simple salad that usually accompanies fish, or other main dishes. Broccoli and cauliflower are cut in large pieces, boiled and then served with olive oil and lemon juice. It is very seasonal and in many households it is the salad which replaces the summer Greek salad.

So after a short trip to the market this week, we bought wonderful winter vegetables and decided to boil them, just like in the classic recipe. But of course, we will kick it up a notch. We’re adding our marinated artichoke hearts with leeks, olive oil and sunflower oil. They are perfect to enjoy on their own, but here, they completely transform our vegetables!

Often, recipes call for draining the artichokes -remember our tomato rice from a few weeks ago? It is, however such a pity to let all all this amazing flavoured olive oil go to waste. So we have decided to use it instead of a dressing! And of course, our beloved feta cheese turns this salad into a wonderful lunch! Add a few splashes of lemon juice or vinegar and you’ve got yourselves a delicious – and very easy to make- winter salad! An ode to the classic one.

Serves 2

1 small head of broccoli
1 small head of cauliflower
½ jar marinated artichoke hearts (in their oil)
150g feta cheese
salt, lemon juice or white wine vinegar (to serve)

Cut the broccoli and cauliflower in large florets. Place them in a large pot and cover with water. Boil for a few minutes, until you’ve reached your desired tenderness. We boiled ours quite a bit, to have the same texture as the buttery artichoke hearts, but you can also simply blanch them by submerging them for a few minutes in boiling water. Drain and set aside.

While the vegetables are still warm, place in a large bowl. Add the artichokes and their oil. Toss everything together until the vegetables are coated in the olive oil. Crumble the feta cheese and add to the salad.

Serve warm, with salt if desired and lemon or vinegar.

 


It’s the beginning of February today after what has felt like a long January. But blood oranges have appeared at the market, which makes us very, very happy! Citrus fruits are at their best at this time of the year and the ideal way to get vitamins and nutrients. Plus, they look amazing! Remember our colourful fennel and citrus salad? Or our citrus dressing? So many amazing things to do with citrus!

This week we’ve got a dressing for you. We’ve used our tahini, our go-to ingredient for all sorts of recipes, including dressings!

We’ve used our whole tahini, made from 100% whole sesame paste. But you can use the classic one, or a combination of the two! Both are produced in Greece using organic sesame. There is no added salt or other ingredients. Tahini has an intense, wholesome nutty flavour that pairs perfectly with citrus! We’ve also used our lemon oil, so it’s citrus bliss all around!

This dressing requires the perfect balance between sweet, nutty, sour and salty. But as you know, some oranges are sweeter than others. So as you whisk everything together, taste it. Then add a bit more lemon if it needs more acidity; a teaspoon of honey for sweetness (we did!); more salt.

Makes 1 jar

100g tahini (7tbsp)
juice of 1 medium lemon (5 tbsp)
juice of 2 medium blood oranges (9 tbsp)
90ml 17 C lemon oil (6tbsp)
3 tbsp water
salt, pepper, dried thyme (to taste)
1 tsp orange blossom honey (optional)

In a bowl whisk together the tahini, lemon and blood orange juices. Add the lemon olive oil and whisk until you have a thick paste. Add the water to make your dressing more runny. Season with salt, pepper and thyme. Taste and adjust for seasoning, adding the honey if needed.

This dressing is great with raw vegetables like carrots or cauliflower, green leaves, grilled vegetables, bulgur wheat salads (simply add some pomegranate, nuts and fresh herbs!) or even as part of your morning smoothie.