Summer is in full swing and this week we’ve decided to turn off our hob. There’s nothing better than enjoying a lazy morning, sitting on the balcony or living room, sipping something refreshing and enjoying the summer quiet.

To inspire you, this week we’ve decided to make a simple, yet delicious smoothie for you. We absolutely love fresh fruit in our breakfasts, remember our summer fruit granola or our pear, galomyzithra cheese and bee pollen toast? So in this smoothie we’ve used peaches and bananas. But you can also add nectarines, apricots, cherries, whatever you can find at the market these days!

We’ve used Greek yoghurt (of course!), a tiny bit of honey to sweeten our smoothie and our secret ingredient: cinnamon! We are very excited, as you can now find Greek yoghurt on our website, along with other cheese and dairy products! Feta cheese
or halloumi anyone?

 

Serves 2

2 small peaches
1 banana
200g Greek yoghurt
1 tbsp honey
½ tsp cinnamon

Remove the stones from the peaches and peel the banana. In a blender whizz together the fruit, yoghurt, honey and cinnamon.

Serve over ice cubes, with more cinnamon. Or you can or mix it with oats for a full-on summer breakfast! Oh and did we say that this is actually perfect in the afternoon too?

 


All of us at Oliveology love cooking with as little waste as possible. We love putting leftover veggies in hearty soups, to make tarts with whatever jarred ingredients we have in our fridge, and we even make bread with olives and sun-dried tomatoes we don’t feel like eating anymore.

When it comes to overripe fruit, we always go for jams. But I have been for years wondering about banana bread. You see, it’s not a cake, and it’s not a bread either. How does one eat it, really? So last week, when we had some overripe bananas, I knew it was time to see for myself. And when we say overripe, we mean black outside. Don’t bin them, make this recipe!

And of course, as you may know, we love adding olive oil and honey in almost everything. So banana bread could be no exception. This recipe also has Greek yoghurt, and wholemeal barley flour. And we also used a heart-shaped cake tin, no particular reason there.

What to expect: A dark brown colour, very airy, bouncy texture and a wholesome taste that is not at all sweet. So indeed, the name bread is really accurate.

Makes one large loaf (or a heart-shaped tin)

400g very ripe bananas
5tbsp vanilla fir honey
5tbsp olive oil
100g yoghurt (you can find it at our shops at Borough Market and Spa Terminus)
3 eggs
200g wholemeal barley flour
1tbsp baking soda
1tbsp baking powder
30g walnuts, finely chopped

Preheat the oven at 180C.

In a large bowl whisk the bananas until smooth. If you are left with a few banana lumps, that’s ok.

Add the honey, olive oil and yoghurt and whisk again. Add the eggs, one at a time, and whisk until you have a smooth mixture with a few banana lumps.

In a separate bowl, sieve the flour, baking powder and baking soda. Add the mixture to the banana bowl and mix well. You should have something that looks like a slightly denser cake batter.

Grease your cake or bread tin with olive oil and dust with flour. Pour the batter in it and sprinkle the walnuts on top.

Bake at 180C for 30-45 minutes. The banana bread is ready when you insert a knife into the centre and it comes out clean.

Serve with Greek yoghurt and plenty of honey!


The idea for this recipe came to me a while back. While browsing beautiful food pictures on instagram, there was a picture of a dish that gave me the inspiration for this recipe. I think. Because as I started preparing this blog post, I couldn’t find that original instagram picture. So whoever you are out there, thank you.

This recipe is one of these ideas that gets stuck into one’s head and stays there for weeks or months. Until one day, you decide: Today is the day I’m going to make this recipe.

Tzatziki is possibly one of the most emblematic Greek dips. We absolutely love it. Have you prepared the classic recipe? And how about our unique variation with beetroot? This week we used its key ingredients and cooked up a wonderful, garlicky pasta dish. Because as you may know, we love pasta. For this recipe, we used our favourite trichromo pasta penne. But you can use any other pasta you fancy.

This recipe is perfect served warm for dinner, or eaten at room temperature the next day for lunch.

Serves 4

200g trichromo penne
2 cloves of garlic
4 tbsp olive oil, plus more for serving
125g Greek yogurt
2 small cucumbers
1 small bunch of dill
salt and pepper (to taste)

Cut the cucumbers in small, bite-sized cubes. Finely chop the dill.

Cook the pasta in a large pot with salted boiling water until al dente, for around 5 minutes.

In the meantime, finely slice the garlic. Place in a small frying pan with the olive oil and gently fry over low heat until tender and caramelised.

Once the pasta is cooked, drain, reserving a cup of the pasta water. Return to the pot, stirring in the garlic oil. Add the yogurt and stir everything together, adding a bit of the pasta water if needed.

Toss in the cucumber and dill. Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

If you are preparing this for the following day, then keep the cucumber and dill separately, and add once the pasta is cool.


For those of you who follow this blog, you’ll know by now that we love cooking with vegetables. We love making flavourful soups, colourful dips and, of course, salads. But we often wonder, how can we find a way to incorporate more raw veggies in our daily lives?

The solution is quite simple, it seems: Just accompany them with something exciting. Not that raw vegetables aren’t exciting on their own. But let’s be honest, a dip of sorts will take them to a whole other level.

Last week we made this hearty mixed pulses and roasted red peppers dip. This week we’ve got something simpler, yet equally exciting for you. This recipe uses ingredients that we don’t yet have on the website –but we will soon! So come by our Borough Market shop or visit our Railway Arch at Bermondsey, we have all of these in stock!

So go on, source these simple ingredients, and within minutes you’ll have the most interesting dip to accompany raw vegetables.

Makes one bowl:
200g Greek yoghurt
200g galomyzithra cheese (or other soft white cheese)
50g kefir
salt (to taste)
chilli oil (to serve)

In a bowl mix together the yoghurt, galomyzithra cheese and kefir. Season with salt. Drizzle plenty of chilli oil and serve with colourful raw vegetables.


Are you familiar with the song: “Sugar is sweet/ But not as sweet as my baby/ Honey’s a treat but it/ Can’t compete with my baby”? It seems like they have never tried grape molasses! In Greece when we want to say that something/ someone is really sweet, we say they are sweet like petimezi. One great thing about our health awareness and sugar rush/ tax era is rediscovering excellent ingredients like this one. Grape molasses or petimezi, is an ancient food, popular for its nutritious qualities and delightful flavour. Before establishing the use of sugar, petimezi was very commonly used across the Mediterranean and especially Greece, not only as a sweetener but as a remedy as well.

Petimezi’s flavour is sweet with a hint of spice and its aroma is pungent, potent and so incredibly tempting. This excellent product comes from boiling grape-must in low heat for a long time. It is rather expensive since the production process is long and the yield is small. Its texture is quite similar to aged balsamic vinegar; if you are an Ottolenghi fan, then you are definitely familiar with pomegranate molasses and can use petimezi, accordingly.

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