Serving homemade condiments is a brilliant way of showing your guests that you have made an extra effort cooking for them. Pairing the main course with homemade chutney will make your guests, really intrigued. It can be made in advance but if not, it will fill your kitchen with wonderful smells, which your guests will find extra appetising.

According to its definition, this spicy condiment contains fruit, vinegar, sugar and spices. It can vary in texture from chunky to smooth and in degrees of spiciness from mild to hot. Chutney is a delectable companion to curried dishes. The sweeter chutneys also make interesting bread spreads and are delicious served with cheese.

Toast 70g of Aegina pistachios in a preheated oven in 160°C for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, remove the yellow skin from a mid-sized quince with a vegetable peeler and and peel it chunky.

Sauté a finely chopped onion in a pan, with 40ml evoo. Keep stirring in low heat until it caramelises. Add the peeled quince, a teaspoon of chilli flakes, 2 teaspoons of honey, 50g sugar, a cinnamon stick, a star anise, a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar and 50ml of apple juice. Simmer for 30-40 minutes until it forms a jam-like texture. Check the mix frequently and add water only if there is no liquid left.

Add the pistachios to a food processor (or blender) and pulse it to chop them coarsely. Add some freshly ground pepper, stir it well and serve. Alternatively, pour into sterile jars and use within six months.

We can’t help but thinking the wonderful sandwiches you can have with your leftover Sunday roast, Christmas or Thanksgiving turkey. Of course, we find this quince condiment perfect with a cheese board and/or charcuterie. Enjoy!

A while ago we wrote a blogpost on pistachios explaining what makes our Greek pistachios from Aegina Island (P.D.O) so special. You can find them online or on site in three different forms: roasted and lightly salted, roasted and unsalted and raw unsalted kernels.


How can you not love pistachios? They are a wonderful snack, the main ingredient to crunchy and flaky baklava, make an exquisite ice cream, they lift the flavour and texture of every food they are added to, from dressings to salads, casseroles, puddings and baked goods.

The pistachio is “technically” not a nut. The seed, commonly thought of as a nut, is as a matter of fact a culinary and not a botanical nut. The fruit is a drupe, containing an elongated seed, which is the edible portion. The English word pistachio is derived from the ancient Greek word pist.kion (πιστάκιον). The main producers of pistachios worldwide are Iran, United States and Turkey, while China seems to be the first consuming country. The pistachio tree is native to western Asia and Asia Minor, from Syria to the Caucasus and Afghanistan. Several cultivars exist however, the most popular variety grown for commercial purposes is kerman.

What is so special about the Greek pistachios? It appears that pistachio trees came to Greece from Western Asia. The unique cultivated type of pistachios from Aegina, has been awarded a Protected Designation of Origin (P.D.O) product status, since 1977. It has an almost-white shell, a sweet taste, a red-green kernel and a little bit more closed-mouth shell than the variety found in the United States. The ideal climate conditions of the island and the composition of the soil give these pistachios from Aegina the aroma and taste that make them stand out The specific variety has been systematically cultivated in Aegina since the 1860s. Nikolaos Peroglou organised the first pistachio orchard in Aegina, in the area of Limbones, by the sea, in 1896. He is considered one of the most infuential figures in the island as he dedicated his life to the cultivation of pistachio trees. Author of the book “The Pistachio Tree”, he documented everything that the cultivation of the pistachio tree needs. Determined that the Aeginitans should plant pistachio trees, when he wanted to give a present, he would give a pistachio tree sapling.

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