Summer is the time of the year when we try to avoid turning on the oven. We love simple recipes that can be eaten cold or at room temperature. So this week we’ve got a very unique dip for you. It’s great to bring to a summer barbecue or picnic. It also makes for a wonderful lunch, spread over toasted bread with some sliced cucumber on top.

We are making a yogurt and herb dip, with dakos rusks and walnuts! The inspiration for this recipe is from the book Herbs in Cooking by Maria and Nikos Psilakis.

We are using our walnuts and dakos rusks, which both add depth and texture to this dip. You can grind them until they resemble coarse sand, or alternative you can crush them with your hands, adding more texture to this dip.

This dip is packed with fresh and dried herbs. We love fresh parsley, together with dried oregano, but feel free to play around with different herbs. Definitely use our 21°C Olive Oil with Walnuts, Fennel, Rosemary & Oregano, which pairs perfectly with the dip’s flavours.

Makes one large jar

100g dakos rusks
50g walnuts
1 clove of garlic
small bunch of fresh parsley
250g yoghurt
1 tsp dried basil
1 tsp dried oregano
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
4 tbsp walnut oil, plus more for serving
2 tbsp water
salt, pepper

In a blender or using your hands grind or crush the dakos rusks and walnuts.

Grate the garlic and finely chop your parsley.

In a large bowl mix the yoghurt with the dried basil and oregano. Add the ground dakos and walnuts, parsley and garlic. Stir well. Add the vinegar and walnut oil, and a few splashes of water to loosen up the mixture (if needed). Taste and adjust for seasoning.

Let the dip stand for a couple of hours before serving so that the flavours develop. Serve with more walnut oil.


The 25th of March is the Greek Independence day, coinciding with the Feast of the Annunciation. Independence day celebrates the Greek War of Independence (1821–1829) and the liberation of Greece from the Ottoman occupation. The Feast of the Annunciation commemorates the visit of archangel Gabriel to Virgin Mary, informing her that she would be the mother of the Son of God, Jesus Christ.

When it comes to food, the 25th of March falls within the 40-day period of strict fasting before Easter, when Greeks are invited to abstain from all animal flesh. But given the celebratory character of the day, consuming fish is allowed. The traditional dish of the day – with several regional variations – is salted codfish, battered and deep fried, and served with skordalia.

As we’ve written before, skordalia is a traditional Greek dip, made with raw garlic, “skordo” as is its name in Greek. It is usually made with potato, or bread, and occasionally nuts are added. Today we have the classic recipe for you, made with potato. It is by Katerina, Nafsika’s mother.

Serves 6-8 as a dip

600g potatoes (2-3 large)
150ml olive oil, plus more to serve
6-8 cloves of garlic (to taste)
1 tbsp red wine vinegar
salt, pepper (to taste)

Place the potatoes in a large pot with plenty of cold water. Bring to the boil and cook until tender, around 40min. Drain and while the potatoes are still hot, peel off their skin. Let them cool down. Crumble into large pieces.

In a food processor (or using a pestle and mortar) blend together the olive oil and garlic. Slowly add the potatoes and blend everything together until you have a smooth mixture.

Transfer to a bowl, season with salt and pepper and add the vinegar. Taste and adjust for seasoning/vinegar. Serve drizzled with more olive oil.


A few weeks back, a delicious dip was brought to us by a small cheeseroom in Kozani, Northern Greece. This is Riganati, they told us. Rigani is the Greek name for oregano, so we immediately knew that we would love it, as we love all-things oregano. The dip, made with creamy feta cheese, olive oil and oregano brought back many childhood memories of my grandmother. Whenever we had lunch at her house she would take a piece of feta cheese, crumble it with her fork, then pour over some olive oil and sprinkle some oregano. She would mash up everything together and we would have it with crusty bread.

So from my grandmother’s table and Northern Greece, this is our own version for this delicious dip, which you can serve as is, or dilute it with a bit of milk and pour over pasta or roasted vegetables (yes, broccoli loves this!).

For this, we used our organic feta cheese, a classic Greek feta cheese made from organic sheep’s and goats’ milk, in the Peloponnese. It is a bright cheese, soft in the mouth with a buttery and slightly peppery aftertaste, perfect for this dish. Also awarded PDO status! But you can use a more mature feta cheese if you prefer, for a more complex flavour.

Serves 5

250g feta cheese
125g milk
2tsp olive oil (plus more for serving)
Ground oregano (to taste)

In a small saucepan, heat up the milk until warm but not boiling. In a food processor add the feta cheese, olive oil and the warm milk and blend everything together until smooth. Add a few pinches of ground oregano, blend everything together again. Taste and add more oregano if needed.

This will set in the fridge but you can dilute it with a bit more milk if desired. Serve with plenty of olive oil and crusty bread.


Our favourite summer vegetable is aubergine. We love its texture, meaty flesh, comforting bite. This member of the nightshade family has a distinct taste when cooked, and really loves smoke. So if you ever find yourself in a barbeque, get some aubergine in there.

In Greek cuisine, aubergine is widely used (and only during the summer), in a variety of dishes such as briam, moussaka or in the all-famous melitzanosalata. Melitzanosalata, literally meaning ‘aubergine salad’ is a spread made with the cooked or smoked aubergine flesh. It exists in many other food cultures in various combinations of ingredients and flavours.

Today, we’ve prepared the classic Greek melitzanosalata for you. But don’t forget to check our less ordinary take on this summer classic, with tahini and honey.

We used white aubergines because we love their sweet taste, but any kind will do. In a variation of this recipe, you can also add finely chopped roasted red peppers, which we also recommend trying.

Serves 4-6

2 large aubergines (approx. 800g)
1 tbsp olive oil (or more, to taste)
2 tsp aged balsamic vinegar (or more, to taste)
1 small clove garlic (or more, to taste)
1 small bunch of parsley
salt, pepper
1 roasted red pepper, finely chopped (optional)

Preheat your oven at 180C.

Using a fork, pierce your aubergines all around. Place them in a roasting tray and roast for about an hour, until very tender inside. Remove from the oven and let them cool down a bit.

Once the aubergines are cool enough to handle, scoop out the flesh and place it in a bowl. Drain any excess liquid.

Using a fork, mash up the aubergine flesh. Finely chop the parsley and add it to your bowl. Add the olive oil, balsamic vinegar and roasted red pepper (if using). Grate in the garlic and season with salt and pepper. Mix everything well together using your fork.

Taste and adjust for seasoning, vinegar, olive oil or garlic.

Serve with more olive oil!


Skordalia is a traditional Greek dip, made with raw garlic, “skordo” as is its name in Greek. It is eaten every year on the 25th of March, the Greek Independence Day, alongside battered fried cod. It is also a classic dish found on every taverna. It accompanies boiled beetroot or green beans, fried zucchini or aubergine.

The classic recipe calls for olive oil, vinegar and either stale bread soaked in water or boiled potato. Sometimes nuts are also added. There are of course many variations and each household has its own loved version of the dish.

As spring is coming to an end, young garlic is all around us. So this week we’re making skordalia, but with a few twists. This is a recipe adapted from a 1989 calendar with traditional Greek recipes and comes from mainland Greece. We are adding fresh spinach, which gives a wonderful green colour, and almond butter, for a nutty take on the classic dish. Our smooth almond butter is made purely from organic, raw almonds, with no added salt or any preservatives. It is the ideal way to get all the nutrients from nuts! Feel free to use whatever type of garlic you prefer; wild garlic leaves would also work great here.

We are using our favourite Ergani olive oil, which has a robust, rich flavour and our white wine vinegar for that gentle kick.

Serves 6

100g stale bread (we used white sourdough)
100g spinach leaves (1 cup)
100g almond butterraw almonds or other nuts
2 cloves of garlic
130g olive oil
2 tbsp white wine vinegar
salt, more olive oil and vinegar to taste

Soak the bread in water for a few minutes until soft. Squeeze out all excess water and place it in a food processor.

Add the spinach, almond butter, garlic and vinegar and pulse everything together, slowly adding the olive oil.

You should have a thick homogenous mixture.

Season with salt, adding more olive oil and vinegar to taste.


Happy Monday everyone! We hope you are enjoying this bank holiday and that you’ve had a lovely Easter.

Greek Easter is still upon us, on the 2nd of May. During all these 40 days that precede our Easter, many choose to fast. Some remove meat from their dishes; others abstain from all animal products. It is the time of the year for dishes made with vegetables, grains and pulses and of course, olive oil!

So this week, we’ve prepared for you a delicious, wholesome dip made with gigantes beans. These giant beans are perhaps the most traditional Greek ingredient. They are the basis for many iconic and absolutely delicious Greek dishes: enjoy them in the classic recipe, oven-baked with tomato sauce or in this lovely spring salad! They are nutritious, super filling and very tasty.

For this dip we’ve used our dark tahini and walnut oil, which add depth and warmth to the buttery beans. The result is a comforting dip that will definitely bring some feasting into the fasting!

Serves 6

150g gigantes beans
5 cups water / vegetable stock
3 bay leaves
50g whole tahini
2 tbsp lemon juice, plus more for serving
2 tbsp 21°C walnut oil, plus more for serving
salt
sesame seeds (optional, to serve)

The night before soak your beans. The morning after, drain and place your beans in a medium-sized pot with fresh water or vegetable stock. Add the bay leaves. Bring to the boil and then lower the heat to medium-high and cook until the beans are soft and buttery, around one hour.

Drain, reserving a bit of the cooking liquid. Set aside to cool for a bit.

In a blender, whiz together the beans, tahini, lemon juice, walnut oil, adding a bit of the cooking liquid to loosen the mixture – if needed. Season with salt.

Serve with plenty of walnut olive oil, more lemon juice, sesame seeds and raw vegetables, crusty bread or pita for dipping


As one of our friends always says “you can never go wrong with a big pot of fava in the fridge”. And he is right. For us Greeks fava is comforting, reminds us of home and somehow a big pot of fava makes us feel a bit safer. Especially during a lockdown in the midst of a pandemic.

Fava is very easy to make, but as it only contains very few ingredients, these need to be of the best possible quality. Our golden yellow split peas come from organic farms in northern Greece and have a very robust flavour! You can read more about fava and the beauty in the simplicity of Greek cooking in our blog post from a few years ago.

We have now started making our own fava dip, in our kitchen in Bermondsey. Made with love and packed with veggies, this dip is now available at Borough Market and Spa Terminus!

This week however, we have digressed from the classic recipes. We took inspiration from our new Ginger, Lime & Basil Olive Oil, and created an exciting dish that reinvents the classic recipe! Fava with ginger, lime and basil!

Serves 4

1 thumb-sized piece of ginger
1/2 red onion
1 small carrot
60ml olive oil
2 tbsp ginger, lime and basil olive oil, plus more for serving
200g fava
1tsp dried basil 
3 cups of water
salt, to taste
1 lime, zest and juice (to serve)
1 spring onion, finely chopped (to serve)

Rinse the fava under running water, until the water runs clear. Drain and set aside.

Roughly chop the ginger. Peel and roughly chop the onion and carrot. Place the vegetables, the olive oil and ginger, lime and basil olive oil in a medium-sized pot over high heat.

Immediately add the fava and stir. Add the water, bring to the boil and lower the heat to the lowest setting. Cover and let it simmer until your fava breaks down, around an hour.

It may appear loose, but worry not, it thickens up once it cools down a bit.

You can serve as is, or you can blend it until smooth.

Serve with plenty of ginger, lime and basil olive oil, lime zest and juice and spring onions.


As you may already know we love making dips with pulses. Have you tried our mixed pulses dip? Or our bean dip with roasted red peppers and sun-dried tomatoes?

It’s a great way to eat beans, especially when it’s warm outside and the weather calls for something other than a stew or a soup. So this week we’ve prepared a lovely white dip, using our little small beans from Grevena, in northern Greece. You can use gigantes beans as well if you prefer, but we like these little ones.

We are making it with a few simple ingredients: spring onions and garlic, but you can experiment with any other onions or garlic that you have handy. And we’ve added a secret ingredient, capers!

And as we realised, this dip is also lovely served as a side dish, instead of mashed potatoes or any other mash you may be making. Yum!

Makes one large bowl

250g small beans
3 cloves of garlic
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
4 tbsp lemon juice
zest from 1 lemon
2 spring onions
2 tbsp capers

The night before soak your beans. The morning after drain, and cook in plenty of water until tender.

Drain the cooked beans, reserving one cup of the cooking liquid. Set aside and let cool.

Roughly chop the spring onions, garlic and capers.

In a blender blend together the beans, olive oil, lemon juice and zest, spring onions, garlic and capers. You will need to add a bit of the cooking liquid to loosen up the mixture. We used ½ a cup, but you might need a bit more. Once your mixture is smooth transfer to a bowl and season with salt and pepper.

We prefer serving this dip on a simple white soup plate. Sometimes simplicity is quite calming, I do not know if you agree?

But if you’re into decorating, then finely chop some spring onions, add some more capers, reserve some of the cooked beans, drizzle some olive oil and add some more lemon zest. Either way, enjoy with some raw vegetables and crusty bread!

 


How are you all doing? Most of us around the world are at home these days. To avoid going out, and support local producers many of us at Oliveology go for small veg boxes, brought to us by local farmers. And somehow every week we end up with more carrots than we can grate in salads.

Enter the inspiration for this recipe, so this week we decided to go for a dip. I personally prefer chunkier dips than smooth- and when it comes to root vegetables like carrots, I very much savour their natural sweetness. After making plenty of dips the last few years, the very much loved tahini and yoghurt, or the cheese & yoghurt one, dips with mixed pulses or pistachios, beetroot and oregano and of course, the classic greek ones tzatziki and melitzanosalata, this week we’re going for carrot.

You see, carrot and tahini are really good friends. We are not going to lie, this recipe takes a while. But it can be done in stages over a day or so. Spending more time at home offers this luxury.

Makes one large bowl.

800g carrots
6tbsp olive oil
2 tsps dried thyme
1tbsp grape molasses
1tbsp balsamic vinegar
salt

120ml olive oil
4 tbsp lemon juice or vinegar
1tbsp grape molasses
4tbsp tahini
150ml water
sesame seeds (to serve)

Preheat the oven at 180C.

You can peel the carrots if you want, but we just scrubbed them and removed the tops. Roughly cut the carrots in small pieces. We went for buttons, the size of your small finger.
Toss them together with the olive oil, grape molasses, vinegar, thyme and salt and place in a baking tray.

Bake for half an hour, until caramelised, but not tender. Add a cup of water and keep baking for another half hour, adding water if needed, until the carrots are tender and there’s a bit of liquid left in your baking tray.

Remove from the oven and let them cool.

Whizz together the carrots with the olive oil, lemon juice, grape molasses and tahini, adding a bit of water to loosen up the mixture if needed. Season with salt. Now, it’s time you made it your own. Do you want to go for something nuttier? Drizzle some more tahini. If you want it a bit sweeter (that’s me!), go for grape molasses. And for the more adventurous ones out there, we got you: just add more lemon juice, olive oil and salt.

Serve with more olive oil and with plenty of sesame seeds, if you’ve got.

 


For those of you who follow this blog, you’ll know by now that we love cooking with vegetables. We love making flavourful soups, colourful dips and, of course, salads. But we often wonder, how can we find a way to incorporate more raw veggies in our daily lives?

The solution is quite simple, it seems: Just accompany them with something exciting. Not that raw vegetables aren’t exciting on their own. But let’s be honest, a dip of sorts will take them to a whole other level.

Last week we made this hearty mixed pulses and roasted red peppers dip. This week we’ve got something simpler, yet equally exciting for you. This recipe uses ingredients that we don’t yet have on the website –but we will soon! So come by our Borough Market shop or visit our Railway Arch at Bermondsey, we have all of these in stock!

So go on, source these simple ingredients, and within minutes you’ll have the most interesting dip to accompany raw vegetables.

Makes one bowl:
200g Greek yoghurt
200g galomyzithra cheese (or other soft white cheese)
50g kefir
salt (to taste)
chilli oil (to serve)

In a bowl mix together the yoghurt, galomyzithra cheese and kefir. Season with salt. Drizzle plenty of chilli oil and serve with colourful raw vegetables.