As one of our friends always says “you can never go wrong with a big pot of fava in the fridge”. And he is right. For us Greeks fava is comforting, reminds us of home and somehow a big pot of fava makes us feel a bit safer. Especially during a lockdown in the midst of a pandemic.

Fava is very easy to make, but as it only contains very few ingredients, these need to be of the best possible quality. Our golden yellow split peas come from organic farms in northern Greece and have a very robust flavour! You can read more about fava and the beauty in the simplicity of Greek cooking in our blog post from a few years ago.

We have now started making our own fava dip, in our kitchen in Bermondsey. Made with love and packed with veggies, this dip is now available at Borough Market and Spa Terminus!

This week however, we have digressed from the classic recipes. We took inspiration from our new Ginger, Lime & Basil Olive Oil, and created an exciting dish that reinvents the classic recipe! Fava with ginger, lime and basil!

Serves 4

1 thumb-sized piece of ginger
1/2 red onion
1 small carrot
60ml olive oil
2 tbsp ginger, lime and basil olive oil, plus more for serving
200g fava
1tsp dried basil 
3 cups of water
salt, to taste
1 lime, zest and juice (to serve)
1 spring onion, finely chopped (to serve)

Rinse the fava under running water, until the water runs clear. Drain and set aside.

Roughly chop the ginger. Peel and roughly chop the onion and carrot. Place the vegetables, the olive oil and ginger, lime and basil olive oil in a medium-sized pot over high heat.

Immediately add the fava and stir. Add the water, bring to the boil and lower the heat to the lowest setting. Cover and let it simmer until your fava breaks down, around an hour.

It may appear loose, but worry not, it thickens up once it cools down a bit.

You can serve as is, or you can blend it until smooth.

Serve with plenty of ginger, lime and basil olive oil, lime zest and juice and spring onions.


It’s apple season all right and this week we’re making a wonderful breakfast – dessert recipe with, what else, apples!

Have you tried our olive oil and apple cake? Or our apple porridge? How about our grape molasses tart tatin?

As you may know, when it comes to fruit, we prefer recipes that bring out the natural sweetness of fruits. We are very excited about this one, as it’s quite simple to make but the flavours are quite complex. What is it? An apple and dried cherries compote!

The secret lies in the ingredients! We’ve used our favourite dried cherries to complement the apples, fig molasses to add depth to our compote, cinnamon for warmth and our apple oil for some aromatic silkiness.

The result is a comforting apple compote, which will brighten up your mornings. It is perfect served over Greek yoghurt, porridge, or on its own as breakfast. It also makes for a delicious pie filling, or a side to pork-based dishes or a simple steamed rice.

Makes 1 jar

2 large apples (500g)
2 tbsp fig molasses
½ tsp cinnamon
75g dried cherries
1 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp apple olive oil
a small espresso cup of water (80g)

Remove the core and seeds from the apples. You can peel them if you want, but we prefer not to. Dice the apples. Place them in a medium-sized saucepan with the rest of the ingredients. Stir well.

Turn up the heat and as soon as you see the liquid bubbling, lower the heat. Let your compote cook for around 45-50 minutes, until the apples are soft and mellow.

This recipe is not on the very sweet side, as we’ve used no sugar or honey. If you have a sweet tooth, you can add some towards the end of the cooking.

Serve warm or cold.


Trahanas is a very unique Greek ingredient and an ideal way to take a culinary journey to Greece. It is a combination of fermented milk and wheat. You can use it to make a comforting thick soup, add it to your stews for some texture or have it instead of porridge in the morning.

We love its slightly tangy flavour and comforting smell. In autumn, we always make cook with trahanas. So this week we’ve decided to combine it with our favourite autumn vegetable: mushrooms! And of course, what is the perfect pairing when it comes to these flavours? Truffles. Yes, this week we are making a luscious trahanas soup, with mushrooms and truffles!

For this, we are using our black truffle flakes  a very unique ingredient. These aromatic flakes of dehydrated black summer truffle (Tuber aestivum) only need to be rehydrate in lukewarm water and add an exquisite depth to your dishes. And to make it even more lush, we’re serving this dish with truffle oil!

Serves 2 as main, 4 as a starter

250g large button mushrooms
1 tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion
1/2 leek
3 tbsp olive oil
100g sour trahanas
4 cups vegetable stock
1/3 pack truffle flakes plus one cup of water
truffle oil (to serve)

Cut the mushrooms in half or in quarters. In a frying pan add 1 tbsp of olive oil, just to coat the bottom of the pan. Place your mushrooms, all in one layer and cook over high heat, turning occasionally, until the mushrooms are golden brown on the outside.

As the mushrooms are cooking, finely chop the leek and onion. Add the rest of the olive oil in a pot and over medium-low heat gently fry the onion and leek, until translucent. Add the trahanas and stir to coat with the olive oil. Add the mushrooms and your stock. Bring to the boil, and then lower the heat and let your soup simmer, covered, for 45 minutes, until trahanas is tender.
A few minutes before serving uncover the pot and rehydrate the truffles in one cup of lukewarm water. When the soup is ready, add the truffles and flavoured water. Stir well and serve immediately, drizzling some truffle oil on top.


We were so proud to receive the news for the Great Taste Awards! Every year we participate in Great Taste, the world’s largest and most trusted food and drink awards and we are always very excited when the results come in!

A panel of over 500 experts spent time tasting our lovely products and we are very proud to announce that we have five products with star ratings! Below are the awarded products and some of the judges’ comments. We can’t wait to celebrate!

18°C organic extra virgin olive oil *1 star*

This is the first olive oil of the season, made from unripe olives when they are still small and green. An olive oil with intense flavour and a unique grassy taste. Some of the judges’ comments:

Beautiful, richly coloured, green-gold olive oil with its warm, fruity and peppery aromas. Smooth and silky in texture, the oil dissipates on the palate to reveal its flavour profiles. Sweet meadow hay, buttery artichoke and fresh green almond notes are quickly followed by peppery, feisty young fruit flavours, daring and bold. An astringency plays around the edge of the palate leaving a natural vibrancy. This oil is fresh, lively and spirited.

This buttery light oil has a gentleness suitable for light salads.

Young, fun and delicious!

 

Ginger, Lime & Basil Olive Oil *1 star*

This special oil is made from semi-ripe olives crushed with ginger, lime and basil. It has a vibrant flavour and intense aromas. Some of the judges’ comments:

A deep golden coloured, clear oil with a warm ginger aroma. The flavours of ginger and basil are quite soft and mellow, well balanced with the richness of the oil. The oil has a gentle fruity flavour and is soft and smooth.

The basil was fresh and fragrant, and there was a lovely warmth from ginger followed by a little pepperiness from the oil. The texture was rich and smooth.

 

21°C organic extra virgin olive oil *1 star*

This special oil is made from semi ripe olives crushed with walnuts, purslane, and wild aromatic herbs giving a fresh taste that is full of flavour. Some of the judges’ comments:

Thick and buttery on the palate, it has a strong, lingering herbal flavour.

A gorgeous rich green olive oil positively glistening with natural goodness and tantalizing the palate with its aromas of sweet and aromatic fennel. Smooth and silky in the mouth…Brisk walnut flavours are followed by woody, resinous heady notes from rosemary…The peppery fruit flavours are present and bring a feisty little kick on the finish.

An interesting and intensely aromatic oil – the flavours are so clearly Greek. The fennel seeds provide a striking sweetness with a little bit of nutty bitterness from the walnuts.

 

Plain Kalamata olives *1 star*

These are the classic Kalamata olives. They have a great flavour and fleshy texture. Some of the judges’ comments:

A really rich reddish brown and plump, these olives pack a punch. The salt level is excellent and balances well with the bitterness. There’s hints of sweetness towards the end of the olive profile also present in the marinating oil.

Your Kalamata olives have such a wonderful black purple shine, and truly do look inviting… your olives are fruity in texture and flavour and deliver a truly traditional Kalamata taste.

These olives have a beautiful blackish brown colour, a shiny firm looking skin and a fruity aroma. The flesh is meaty but tender in the mouth and there is lots of upfront fruity sweetness and acidity followed by a pleasing touch of bitterness.

 

Kalamata olives with ouzo *1 star*
Kalamata olives, marinated in extra virgin olive oil, ouzo, lemon peel, star-anise and fennel to produce a unique Greek olive taste. Some of the judges’ comments:

Beautifully shiny Kalamata olives. There is a distinct aniseed/ouzo aroma. The olive flesh is soft and giving, coming off the stone well…the combination is very reminiscent of sitting at a harbour side bar with a bowl of olives and a iced glass of cloudy ouzo. The balance at the finish is long and good.

Wonderfully plump, glossy looking olives with a distinct aroma of ouzo. The olives are soft and juicy.

 

Have a look at exciting recipes with olive oil, flavoured olive oils, and olives all around our blog.

 


We’ve got a new olive oil from our farm in Sparta! The Ginger, Lime & Basil Olive Oil is a very special oil. It is made from semi-ripe olives of the Koroneiki, Athinoelia and Kalamata varieties. These are crushed together with ginger, lime and basil. We use 1200g of semi-ripe olives to produce 100ml of this cold extracted oil. Of course it has no additives or preservatives. It has a very vibrant flavour and intense aromas, and a fascinating aftertaste.

This olive oil pairs perfectly with white fish and rice dishes. But what is the ideal way to savour such an exquisite olive oil? Vegetables, of course, as they are the perfect canvas to bring out its delicious colours. So this week, after a visit to the market, we got some fresh green beans and created this lovely recipe for you. It is quite simple, yet this olive oil transforms the green beans into magic!

This is great for a light lunch, but can also be served as a side dish as part of a meal.

Serves 2

500g green beans
2 small red onions
2 fat clove of garlic
4 tbsp olive oil
50g raw almonds
4 tbsp Ginger, Lime & Basil Olive Oil, plus more for serving
zest 1 lime
1 tbsp. lime juice
salt (to taste)

Cut your beans in large bite-sized pieces.
Place your beans in a large pot with boiling, salted water and cook for approx. 5-7 minutes until tender but not soft. Drain and place in a large bowl. While the beans are still warm, toss them together with the ginger, lime and basil olive oil, lime juice and zest. Season with salt. Set aside.

Finely slice the onion and mince the garlic. Gently fry in the olive oil, over medium-low heat, until caramelised, approx. 4-5 minutes. Roughly chop the almonds and add them to your frying pan. Cook for another 2-3 minutes.

Serve the beans with the onion-almond mixture, drizzling some more ginger, lime and basil olive oil if needed.


For some reason the first days of September often still feel like summer. All of us at Oliveology use this week to regroup from time off during the summer, to reflect on the year ahead of us, make plans and dreams. The weather feels as if it is ready for autumn of course, but as a farewell to the summer, this week we’ve prepared a tart, using a selection of the last summer tomatoes.

It is a very easy and quite well-known dish, which can be made with not much fuss (it is the end of summer, after all). It looks amazing and most importantly, it’s delicious! What makes this tart unique is the combination of cheeses we’ve selected!

As you know we love cheese, especially cheese that is made with care. Our manouri and galomyzithra cheeses are two of our favourites. White, creamy, and full of flavour! You can find them at our Borough Marker shop and as part of our Greek cheese selection – just make sure to ask for them when you place your order.

We used puff pastry, but this also works with Mrs Kalliopi’s magic dough if you feel like kneading!

1 sheet of puff pastry
200g galomyzithra cheese
100g manouri cheese, grated
1 tbsp 17C olive oil
1 clove of garlic
350g cherry tomatoes
2 sun-dried tomatoes (or more, to taste)
salt, pepper (to taste)
dried thyme (to taste)
1-2 tbsp olive oil

Preheat the oven at 180C.
Roll out the puff pastry in a greased baking sheet. Pierce it with a fork and place it in the oven, for 10-15min or until golden-brown. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Keep the oven on.

In a large bowl, and using a fork, mix together the galomyzithra cheese, the manouri cheese, lemon oil, salt and pepper. Mince the garlic and add to the mixture. Taste and adjust for seasoning.

Cut your tomatoes in halves or quarters and set aside. Cut the sun-dried tomatoes in very small pieces.

Once the puff pastry has cooled down, spread the cheese mixture. Lay the tomatoes and sun-dried tomatoes on top. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle the thyme. Drizzle with a few gulps of olive oil and place the tart back in the oven, to cook for 20-30min.

It is perfect eaten at room temperature, and (our personal preference, don’t ask why), cold the next morning!


This is a very summery dish, that is both filling and very refreshing! It is great served hot, at room temperature, or even cold as a salad. Which, if we are being honest, is one of the things we love most about summer: being able to make simple dishes that you can eat at any temperature according to our mood!

For this dish, we used summer vegetables and orzo. In Greek cuisine, orzo is usually associated with oven-baked tomato-based dishes. It usually accompanies Sunday’s slow cooked meat dishes, but can also be prepared as a dish on its own, as in our vegan version!

As such, in the past we’ve usually prepared it in winter, mixed with black truffle sauce for valentine’s, or oven-baked with saffron, sun-dried tomatoes and galomyzithra cheese.

So we were very excited to try it in a summer recipe! We used peas and courgettes, and our very summery 17C olive oil! A perfect dish for al fresco dining. Needless to say that a bottle of crisp white wine would be the ideal pairing.

Serves 4 for lunch

3 tbsp olive oil
4 fat cloves of garlic
1 cup peas (approx. 150g)
2 medium-sized courgettes, with blossoms if you can find (approx. 300g)
250g orzo
2tbsp 17C olive oil
80g graviera cheese, grated (you can find our graviera cheese in our Greek cheese selection)

Finely slice the courgettes and blossoms. Set aside the blossoms.

In a large frying pan and over medium-low heat gently fry the garlic in the olive oil until transluscent.
Add the peas and courgettes and gently fry for another 7minutes, until everything is covered in the oil.

In the meantime, boil orzo in plenty of salted water until al dente, exactly as you do with pasta. Drain and return to the pot, drizzling the lemon oil, while the orzo is still hot. Stir well.

Add your vegetables, garlic and remaining oil from the pan in the orzo. Toss everything together and add the graviera cheese and blossoms. Serve hot or at room temperature.


This week we’ve got a fascinating recipe for you, which we prepared using the last nettles of the season. We love nettles! A few weeks ago we made a wonderful nettle pesto, so this week we decided to go for something a bit more unusual. In Greece we usually put nettles in pies, but it’s rare that we would ever make something sweet.

But there was Mrs Kalliopi’s delicious olive oil cake recipe, which called for fresh fruit -we had originally made it with graded apples, if you remember? So we thought, why not try with nettles? So there you have it, a bright green olive oil cake with nettles –and a bit of apple. Nettles have a unique flavour, imagine something between spinach, cucumber, a bit grassy, this sort of thing. So now imagine a sweet version of this, and that’s our cake!

As always, make sure to use gloves when handling nettles and to blanch them before using them in cooking.

Makes one small tin

½ cup olive oil
1 large bunch of nettles
1 large green apple
zest from 1 lemon (optional)
1 cup of sugar
1 egg
1 cup of all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
Apple oil (to serve)

Preheat the oven at 180C.

Using gloves, pick the leaves from the nettles and discard the stalks.
In a large pot with boiling water blanch the nettles for 3-5 minutes. Drain and let cool.
Place the nettles in a clean tea towel and squeeze out as much water as you can. Finely chop or (better), blend them into a smooth paste. You should be left with roughly ¾ cups of nettle pulp.

Peel, core and grate the apple. Mix together the apple, nettle pulp and lemon zest if using. Set aside

In a separate bowl sieve together the flour and baking powder and set aside.

In a large bowl whisk together the sugar and olive oil. Add the egg and whisk again until fully incorporated. Slowly add the flour and mix until incorporated. Add the nettles and apple and stir well with a wooden spoon.

Transfer to a greased and floured baking tin. Bake at 180°C for approximately 25 minutes, or until the cake is golden-brown on top and cooked through. To check, you can insert a knife and see if it comes our clean.

Serve with Greek yoghurt and our fragrant apple oil!


Most of us are house-bound I suppose. I don’t know about you, but when there is so much uncertainty around, one of the few things I find soothing is going into the kitchen and cooking.

Despite the world being so precarious, the weather seems to have its own way. This week we are feeling that spring is finally here. Or anyway, glimpses of it.

March has been a challenging month indeed. So we decided to use whatever greens we have in our fridge or freezer and create a comforting dish that is perfect for the times we live in. And to give us a sense of control, this dish can be turned into a soup or stew! For this versatile dish, we used seasonal greens, and bulgur wheat. Mostly because we love the combination of greens and grains, in the traditional spanakoryzo. So we decided to mix it up a bit. Bare in mind, a little bit of bulgur wheat goes a long way.

We’ll have more recipes to come, using cupboard staples. Let us know what ingredients you have available, and we’ll inspire you with recipes! Stay safe and calm.

Serves 6
2 spring onions
1 large leek
2 stalks of celery
5 tbsp olive oil
5 cardamom pods
100g bulgur wheat
4 cups of water
4 cups of seasonal greens (we used a combination of spinach, kale and wild nettle)
A small bunch of parsley (to serve)
17 olive oil (to serve)
lemon juice (to serve)

Finely chop the spring onions, leek and celery. In a large, shallow pot place the olive oil and the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper and slowly cook until tender and caramelised, approximately 10 minutes. Add the cardamom and bulgur wheat and stir well. Add the water and bring to a boil. Then lower the heat and let it simmer for around 30min, until the bulgur wheat and vegetables are very tender. Add the shredded greens.

If you prefer a more soup-like dish, then along with the greens add 3 cups of water.

Let it cook for another 5-10 minutes. Remove from the heat and season with more salt and pepper if needed. Serve with fresh parsley, the 17 lemon oil and lemon juice.

 

 


This week we’ve got a very comforting recipe for you. Soon it will be the beginning of spring, yet some days it still feels like winter. So for those challenging days, there is nothing better than a good casserole dish, to take the blues away.

We are big fans of casseroles, remember our vegan orzo? And then it was the cauliflower with smoked cheese we made a couple of winters ago. This winter, we decided to use beans, as we wanted to feel a bit healthier. And for some reason, beans have that effect. We used small white beans, but you can use gigantes as well.

Our organic beans are harvested every year in farms in northern Greece. You can use them to make your own homemade baked beans, but also add them in soups, stews and grain bowls, like this comforting soup with beans and butternut squash.

This week it’s beans, fragrant pesto and melted graviera cheese. Yum!

Serves 4 with leftovers

200g small beans (you can also choose gigantes butterbeans)
2 bay leaves
2 cups seasonal greens, finely chopped (we used purple kale and spinach)
2 tbsp 17C olive oil
250gr milk or cream
2 eggs
200g graviera cheese, grated
¾ cups pesto (we used our green pistachio pesto)

The night before soak the beans in cold water. The morning after, boil the beans with the bay leaves for around 45 minutes or until tender. Drain the beans and discard the bay leaves.

Steam the greens until soft.

In a bowl whisk together the lemon oil, milk or cream and eggs, adding half of the cheese in the end.

In a casserole, mix together the beans and pesto. Add the eggs-cream mixture and stir everything together, until well mixed. Sprinkle the remaining cheese on top.

Bake at 180C for 30min or until hot and bubbly inside.