This week we’ve got a very summery rice salad for you. It is great for picnics or barbecues, makes for a delicious lunch or light dinner and makes use of July’s seasonal vegetables that we so love.

This rice salad with various variations of vegetables, and with a mustard-olive oil-lemon dressing is a classic in Greek households. In my family we always prepare it on Clean Monday (the day which marks the beginning of lent in Greece), along with taramosalata. Then we use spring vegetables, so I’ve been very excited for this summer take on a family classic.

In this recipe, we used our Carolina rice, which comes from the area of Grevena in the northern part of Greece. Carolina rice is high in amylopectin (starch), making it the perfect ingredient for a creamy risotto or a rice pudding. But here, we’ve rinsed it well, so that we can use it as our base for this summer salad. For our dressing we’ve used a very special oil, made from semi-ripe olives crushed with fresh lemongrass and tarragon. It has an especially fresh flavour and intense aroma, pairing perfectly with our summer vegetables. This salad is great as is, but you can also add some grilled chicken or prawns if you prefer.

Serves 2
100g Carolina rice
1.5 cups of water
250g cherry tomatoes
1 large cucumber
1 small tub of Amfissa green olives
1 lemon, zest and 1 tbsp juice
1 tsp mustard
2 tbsp olive oil with lemongrass & tarragon
dried spearmint (to taste)
salt, pepper (to taste)

Rinse the rice thoroughly, until the water runs clear. Place the rice and 1.5 cups of water in a medium-sized pot and over medium heat. Cook, covered, for around 20 minutes until all the water has been absorbed. Rinse under cold water and set aside.

Cut your cherry tomatoes in half and the cucumber in bite-sized pieces. In a large bowl whisk together the lemon zest and juice, mustard, olive oil with lemongrass & tarragon and spearmint. Add the rice to your bowl, along with your tomatoes, cucumber and olives, and gently toss everything together. Season with salt and pepper.

Serve cold or at room temperature.

 


Summer is the time of the year when we try to avoid turning on the oven. We love simple recipes that can be eaten cold or at room temperature. So this week we’ve got a very unique dip for you. It’s great to bring to a summer barbecue or picnic. It also makes for a wonderful lunch, spread over toasted bread with some sliced cucumber on top.

We are making a yogurt and herb dip, with dakos rusks and walnuts! The inspiration for this recipe is from the book Herbs in Cooking by Maria and Nikos Psilakis.

We are using our walnuts and dakos rusks, which both add depth and texture to this dip. You can grind them until they resemble coarse sand, or alternative you can crush them with your hands, adding more texture to this dip.

This dip is packed with fresh and dried herbs. We love fresh parsley, together with dried oregano, but feel free to play around with different herbs. Definitely use our 21°C Olive Oil with Walnuts, Fennel, Rosemary & Oregano, which pairs perfectly with the dip’s flavours.

Makes one large jar

100g dakos rusks
50g walnuts
1 clove of garlic
small bunch of fresh parsley
250g yoghurt
1 tsp dried basil
1 tsp dried oregano
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
4 tbsp walnut oil, plus more for serving
2 tbsp water
salt, pepper

In a blender or using your hands grind or crush the dakos rusks and walnuts.

Grate the garlic and finely chop your parsley.

In a large bowl mix the yoghurt with the dried basil and oregano. Add the ground dakos and walnuts, parsley and garlic. Stir well. Add the vinegar and walnut oil, and a few splashes of water to loosen up the mixture (if needed). Taste and adjust for seasoning.

Let the dip stand for a couple of hours before serving so that the flavours develop. Serve with more walnut oil.


All of us at Oliveology love cooking with seasonal produce. Every week, we walk around the market and find the fruits and vegetables which provide the inspiration for our recipes. This week our inspiration came from fresh broad beans. These lovely green beans, belonging in the  Fabaceae family are also called fava beans. However, they are not to be confused with fava (aka yellow split peas). They are in season in May in Greece, and in June they will be arriving in London. So let’s prepare!

In this very easy recipe, we slowly cooked fresh broad beans in extra virgin olive oil and served this vibrant dish with plenty of lemon and our 17C olive oil with with lemons, oranges & thyme. This recipe uses the entire pod, so do select broad beans that are young and tender. If you can’t find fresh broad beans, you can use green beans, or even peas in this recipe. Don’t forget to check out our spring recipes, especially these lemony peas.

Serves 2 with leftovers

1kg fresh broad beans
1 leek
2 spring onions
2 tbsp olive oil
500-750ml water
salt, pepper (to taste)
lemon juice, 17C olive oil (to serve)

In this recipe, we are cooking the broad beans whole. To prepare them simply trim the top and bottom and cut each bean in half, so that you have finger-sized beans.

Finely chop the leek and spring onions.

In a large heavy bottomed pot and over medium heat add the olive oil, leek and spring onions. Gently fry until translucent but not caramelised. Add the broad beans and 500ml of water. Season with salt and pepper and gently stir everything together.

Bring to the boil, then lower the heat, cover and let the broad beans cook until tender, for 30-40min, adding a bit more water if needed.

Serve with plenty of lemon juice and our 17C olive oil.

 

 


Spring is in full swing and we’ve got a lovely spring recipe for you. Inspired by the produce we find at the market, this week we’re kicking off May with a vibrant recipe.

As you may know, Greeks love to slowly cook vegetables in olive oil. Rice is often added, as in the very seasonal Spinach & Rice Stew (Spanakorizo), or in the winter Cabbage, Carrot & Rice Stew (Lahanorizo). As leeks are a favourite spring ingredient, this week we’re making a Leek & Rice Stew (Prasorizo).

We serve this vibrant dish with plenty of lemon juice and our favourite flavoured olive oil, the 17C. This is a limited production oil made from unripe olives, crushed with fresh lemons, oranges and thyme. Our special recipe imparts an exquisite citrus twist to this premium olive oil. This oil has a beautiful golden colour and smooth, rich, buttery texture. The aromas of lemon and orange along with the presence of thyme make it a well-balanced olive oil, a perfect accompaniment to spring and summer vegetables and white fish.

Serves 2

4 leeks
2 cloves fresh garlic (or one clove of garlic)
2 tbsp olive oil
½ cup white wine (we used Malagousia)
100g Carolina rice, rinced until the water is clear
Salt, pepper, dried thyme (to taste)
17C Olive Oil with Lemons, Oranges and Thyme (to serve)
Lemon wedges (to serve)

Cut the leeks in large bite-size pieces. Rinse them with plenty of water. Let them dry.

In a shallow casserole and over medium heat add the olive oil and leeks. Cook from all sides until tender, around 5-7 minutes. If you like, you can leave them a bit longer to char. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Add the wine and let it reduce. Add the rice and 650ml water and gently stir everything together. Season with salt, pepper and thyme.

Bring the water to a boil and then cover your casserole, lower the heat and simmer until the leeks are tender and the rice is cooked, around 20-30 minutes.

Serve with plenty of lemon and our flavoured 17C olive oil.


Autumn is officially here and our first recipe for October couldn’t be anything but a comforting soup. If you’ve been following this blog, you must know by now how much we love soups. Remember our luscious celeriac soup? Or our soup with beans and many colourful vegetables? Be it with pulses or just vegetables, soups are our favourite way to get all the nutrients we need. Not to mention, the anticipation of a hot bowl of soup for dinner make us feel wonderful.

This week however we are not using pulses or vegetables for our soup. Instead, we are using trahana, a fascinating ingredient made with wheat and fermented milk. There are two varieties, sour and sweet, and you can opt for either. We selected the sour trahana, as we are serving this soup with dried spiced peppers also known in Greece as boukovo. Boukovo is a blend of various spiced peppers which is widely used in Greek cooking. Because of the variety of the peppers used, it that adds a unique warmth and depth to your dishes. Of course, you can use any other dried chili of your choice. We’ll be serving this soup at our Greek Rural Feast Dinner, this December! Book now, spaces are filling up fast.

Serves 6 as a starter

1 small onion
2 tbsp olive oil
A few pinches of boukovo or dried chilli (to taste)
160g sour trahana
1.5lt vegetable stock
Salt (to taste)
Chili oil (to serve)

Very finely chop your onion.

In a medium-sized pot add the olive oil and onion and cook over medium heat until translucent. Add the boukovo and cook for another minute. Add the trahana and stir well, until the grains are coated in the olive oil.

Add the vegetable stock, season with salt and stir. Bring your soup to a boil, then lower the heat to its lowest setting and cook, covered, for an hour, or until trahana is very, very tender, stirring every few minutes.

Serve immediately with chili oil. If you have leftovers, you can reheat your soup adding some water or vegetable stock, as tranaha tends to absorb all liquid as it cools down.


This Valentines’ Day is unlike any other. Most of us are still on lockdown. We are rarely able to spend time with our loved ones – let alone go out and meet new people to love. But despite the pandemic, or perhaps because of it, now is the time to, more than ever, express our love to the people around us. To ourselves as well.

So this week’s recipe is a very special one. It is an easy and fun recipe to make, it gets your hands messy, and with your favourite music on, it is guaranteed to cheer you up. Plus you know, you are left with lovely chocolate truffles to enjoy -yes we are making chocolate truffles!

But of course, these are no ordinary truffles. Remember last year’s olive oil and dark chocolate mousse? This year we are using olive oil as well, but a very special one. Our 21C olive oil! It is made from semi-ripe olives cold extracted together with walnuts, purslane,  fennel seeds, rosemary and oregano. The wild aromatic herbs give these truffles a subtle earthy flavour; and as we love nuts, so we couldn’t but add plenty in these little chocolate balls.

Makes 25
350g chocolate 60% cocoa (you can do a bit less, or a bit more, depending on what you prefer)
200g double cream
2 tbsp 21C walnut oil
100g nuts (hazelnuts, almonds or walnuts)
to serve (finely chopped nuts, or cocoa, or powdered sugar, or salt and pepper)

Cut the chocolate in small pieces (the size of chocolate chips). Place in a large bowl.

Roughly chop the nuts. Set aside.

In a heavy-bottomed saucepan warm up the double cream until bubbly on the sides, but not boiling. Remove from the heat and pour over the chocolate. Let sit of a couple of minutes.

Using a whisk, slowly whisk together the chocolate and cream (the cream will have melted the chocolate by now). It will slowly come together. Once it does, add the olive oil and whisk again until you have a smooth and shiny mixture.

Add the nuts and stir everything together, using a wooden spoon. Spread the mixture in a shallow baking dish and place it in the fridge. After half an hour or so, it will have changed in texture you will be able to shape it. Give it a bit more time if you need to. Using a teaspoon for measuring shape your chocolate into little balls.

You can serve them as is, or roll them in finely chopped nuts, cocoa, powdered sugar or (our favourite) sprinkle some sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper.

Store them in the fridge for a couple of weeks (well, we seriously doubt they will last that long!) and always serve at room temperature.


As one of our friends always says “you can never go wrong with a big pot of fava in the fridge”. And he is right. For us Greeks fava is comforting, reminds us of home and somehow a big pot of fava makes us feel a bit safer. Especially during a lockdown in the midst of a pandemic.

Fava is very easy to make, but as it only contains very few ingredients, these need to be of the best possible quality. Our golden yellow split peas come from organic farms in northern Greece and have a very robust flavour! You can read more about fava and the beauty in the simplicity of Greek cooking in our blog post from a few years ago.

We have now started making our own fava dip, in our kitchen in Bermondsey. Made with love and packed with veggies, this dip is now available at Borough Market and Spa Terminus!

This week however, we have digressed from the classic recipes. We took inspiration from our new Ginger, Lime & Basil Olive Oil, and created an exciting dish that reinvents the classic recipe! Fava with ginger, lime and basil!

Serves 4

1 thumb-sized piece of ginger
1/2 red onion
1 small carrot
60ml olive oil
2 tbsp ginger, lime and basil olive oil, plus more for serving
200g fava
1tsp dried basil 
3 cups of water
salt, to taste
1 lime, zest and juice (to serve)
1 spring onion, finely chopped (to serve)

Rinse the fava under running water, until the water runs clear. Drain and set aside.

Roughly chop the ginger. Peel and roughly chop the onion and carrot. Place the vegetables, the olive oil and ginger, lime and basil olive oil in a medium-sized pot over high heat.

Immediately add the fava and stir. Add the water, bring to the boil and lower the heat to the lowest setting. Cover and let it simmer until your fava breaks down, around an hour.

It may appear loose, but worry not, it thickens up once it cools down a bit.

You can serve as is, or you can blend it until smooth.

Serve with plenty of ginger, lime and basil olive oil, lime zest and juice and spring onions.


It’s apple season all right and this week we’re making a wonderful breakfast – dessert recipe with, what else, apples!

Have you tried our olive oil and apple cake? Or our apple porridge? How about our grape molasses tart tatin?

As you may know, when it comes to fruit, we prefer recipes that bring out the natural sweetness of fruits. We are very excited about this one, as it’s quite simple to make but the flavours are quite complex. What is it? An apple and dried cherries compote!

The secret lies in the ingredients! We’ve used our favourite dried cherries to complement the apples, fig molasses to add depth to our compote, cinnamon for warmth and our apple oil for some aromatic silkiness.

The result is a comforting apple compote, which will brighten up your mornings. It is perfect served over Greek yoghurt, porridge, or on its own as breakfast. It also makes for a delicious pie filling, or a side to pork-based dishes or a simple steamed rice.

Makes 1 jar

2 large apples (500g)
2 tbsp fig molasses
½ tsp cinnamon
75g dried cherries
1 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp apple olive oil
a small espresso cup of water (80g)

Remove the core and seeds from the apples. You can peel them if you want, but we prefer not to. Dice the apples. Place them in a medium-sized saucepan with the rest of the ingredients. Stir well.

Turn up the heat and as soon as you see the liquid bubbling, lower the heat. Let your compote cook for around 45-50 minutes, until the apples are soft and mellow.

This recipe is not on the very sweet side, as we’ve used no sugar or honey. If you have a sweet tooth, you can add some towards the end of the cooking.

Serve warm or cold.


Trahanas is a very unique Greek ingredient and an ideal way to take a culinary journey to Greece. It is a combination of fermented milk and wheat. You can use it to make a comforting thick soup, add it to your stews for some texture or have it instead of porridge in the morning.

We love its slightly tangy flavour and comforting smell. In autumn, we always make cook with trahanas. So this week we’ve decided to combine it with our favourite autumn vegetable: mushrooms! And of course, what is the perfect pairing when it comes to these flavours? Truffles. Yes, this week we are making a luscious trahanas soup, with mushrooms and truffles!

For this, we are using our black truffle flakes  a very unique ingredient. These aromatic flakes of dehydrated black summer truffle (Tuber aestivum) only need to be rehydrate in lukewarm water and add an exquisite depth to your dishes. And to make it even more lush, we’re serving this dish with truffle oil!

Serves 2 as main, 4 as a starter

250g large button mushrooms
1 tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion
1/2 leek
3 tbsp olive oil
100g sour trahanas
4 cups vegetable stock
1/3 pack truffle flakes plus one cup of water
truffle oil (to serve)

Cut the mushrooms in half or in quarters. In a frying pan add 1 tbsp of olive oil, just to coat the bottom of the pan. Place your mushrooms, all in one layer and cook over high heat, turning occasionally, until the mushrooms are golden brown on the outside.

As the mushrooms are cooking, finely chop the leek and onion. Add the rest of the olive oil in a pot and over medium-low heat gently fry the onion and leek, until translucent. Add the trahanas and stir to coat with the olive oil. Add the mushrooms and your stock. Bring to the boil, and then lower the heat and let your soup simmer, covered, for 45 minutes, until trahanas is tender.
A few minutes before serving uncover the pot and rehydrate the truffles in one cup of lukewarm water. When the soup is ready, add the truffles and flavoured water. Stir well and serve immediately, drizzling some truffle oil on top.


We were so proud to receive the news for the Great Taste Awards! Every year we participate in Great Taste, the world’s largest and most trusted food and drink awards and we are always very excited when the results come in!

A panel of over 500 experts spent time tasting our lovely products and we are very proud to announce that we have five products with star ratings! Below are the awarded products and some of the judges’ comments. We can’t wait to celebrate!

18°C organic extra virgin olive oil *1 star*

This is the first olive oil of the season, made from unripe olives when they are still small and green. An olive oil with intense flavour and a unique grassy taste. Some of the judges’ comments:

Beautiful, richly coloured, green-gold olive oil with its warm, fruity and peppery aromas. Smooth and silky in texture, the oil dissipates on the palate to reveal its flavour profiles. Sweet meadow hay, buttery artichoke and fresh green almond notes are quickly followed by peppery, feisty young fruit flavours, daring and bold. An astringency plays around the edge of the palate leaving a natural vibrancy. This oil is fresh, lively and spirited.

This buttery light oil has a gentleness suitable for light salads.

Young, fun and delicious!

 

Ginger, Lime & Basil Olive Oil *1 star*

This special oil is made from semi-ripe olives crushed with ginger, lime and basil. It has a vibrant flavour and intense aromas. Some of the judges’ comments:

A deep golden coloured, clear oil with a warm ginger aroma. The flavours of ginger and basil are quite soft and mellow, well balanced with the richness of the oil. The oil has a gentle fruity flavour and is soft and smooth.

The basil was fresh and fragrant, and there was a lovely warmth from ginger followed by a little pepperiness from the oil. The texture was rich and smooth.

 

21°C organic extra virgin olive oil *1 star*

This special oil is made from semi ripe olives crushed with walnuts, purslane, and wild aromatic herbs giving a fresh taste that is full of flavour. Some of the judges’ comments:

Thick and buttery on the palate, it has a strong, lingering herbal flavour.

A gorgeous rich green olive oil positively glistening with natural goodness and tantalizing the palate with its aromas of sweet and aromatic fennel. Smooth and silky in the mouth…Brisk walnut flavours are followed by woody, resinous heady notes from rosemary…The peppery fruit flavours are present and bring a feisty little kick on the finish.

An interesting and intensely aromatic oil – the flavours are so clearly Greek. The fennel seeds provide a striking sweetness with a little bit of nutty bitterness from the walnuts.

 

Plain Kalamata olives *1 star*

These are the classic Kalamata olives. They have a great flavour and fleshy texture. Some of the judges’ comments:

A really rich reddish brown and plump, these olives pack a punch. The salt level is excellent and balances well with the bitterness. There’s hints of sweetness towards the end of the olive profile also present in the marinating oil.

Your Kalamata olives have such a wonderful black purple shine, and truly do look inviting… your olives are fruity in texture and flavour and deliver a truly traditional Kalamata taste.

These olives have a beautiful blackish brown colour, a shiny firm looking skin and a fruity aroma. The flesh is meaty but tender in the mouth and there is lots of upfront fruity sweetness and acidity followed by a pleasing touch of bitterness.

 

Kalamata olives with ouzo *1 star*
Kalamata olives, marinated in extra virgin olive oil, ouzo, lemon peel, star-anise and fennel to produce a unique Greek olive taste. Some of the judges’ comments:

Beautifully shiny Kalamata olives. There is a distinct aniseed/ouzo aroma. The olive flesh is soft and giving, coming off the stone well…the combination is very reminiscent of sitting at a harbour side bar with a bowl of olives and a iced glass of cloudy ouzo. The balance at the finish is long and good.

Wonderfully plump, glossy looking olives with a distinct aroma of ouzo. The olives are soft and juicy.

 

Have a look at exciting recipes with olive oil, flavoured olive oils, and olives all around our blog.