If you’ve been following our recipes for a while, you must know by now how much we love traditional Greek recipes, and recipes that are inspired by Greek tradition. We also love our chickpeas –revithada is one of our most popular recipes!

Our chickpeas are harvested every year in organic farms in northern Greece. You can use them to make the traditional revithada soup, or a hearty spiced chickpea stew. Create more filling salads and of course, make your own hummus with our nutty tahini.

Today, we are using chickpeas in a classic Greek combination: slowly cooked with Greens and lemon. For this one, you can use whatever seasonal greens you prefer: chard, kale, spinach, wild greens. If you go for spinach, avoid the baby spinach and select the large leaves, as these are more flavourful and add texture to your dish. Also check out these chickpeas with greens and tomatoes!

Serves 2 with leftovers

200g chickpeas
2 medium onions
2 cloves of garlic
100ml olive oil, plus more for serving
200g seasonal greens (chard, kale, spinach, wild greens etc)
1 lemon, juice and zest (divided)
2 tsp spearmint

The night before soak the chickpeas in plenty of water. The morning after drain and place in a medium-sized pot with 2lt of water. Boil until tender but not mushy, around 1-1.5 hours. Drain, reserving ½ cup of the cooking liquid.

Preheat the oven at 180C.

Peel the onions, cut in half and then finely slice (half-moons).
Grate the garlic.
In a medium-sized frying pan add the olive oil, onions and garlic and gently cook over medium-low hear, until tender and slightly caramelised.

Roughly chop your greens.

In a medium-sized baking dish add the cooked chickpeas, onions, garlic and olive oil, greens, lemon zest, spearmint and the chickpea cooking liquid. Cover with tinfoil and cook in the oven for 40min.

Serve with the lemon juice and more olive oil.


Lentil soup is a classic Greek dish. Every Greek household has its own version. My mother makes it in its simplest form, simply boiling lentils with plenty of garlic. Marianna’s mother adds onions, carrots and celery (and it is this recipe that we have for you today). But no matter what vegetables one chooses for this soup, there is one ingredient that all Greek lentil soups include: bay leaves. These fragrant leaves give a unique aroma, with complex herbal and slightly floral notes. They turn our lentils into a truly comforting meal. Our bay leaves are organic and wild, and hand picked from the mountains of Epirus, in North West Greece.

We’re serving this soup with our 18 extra virgin olive oil (surprisingly our apple oil works great here!) and plenty of vinegar. It is great eaten hot, but keeps well, so it also makes for a great lunch the following day.

Serves 10

150ml olive oil
2 onions
4-5 medium carrots
2 sticks of celery
2 tbsp tomato puree
1kg lentils
4 garlic cloves (plus more if you love garlic)
2-3 bay leaves
5lt water or vegetable stock
salt, pepper (to taste)
18C olive oil (to serve)
red wine vinegar (to serve)

Finely chop your onion, carrot and celery stick. Peel the garlic and leave whole.

In a medium-sized pot add the chopped vegetables and garlic, along with the olive oil. Gently cook over medium heat for a few minutes until tender. Add the tomato puree and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Add the lentils, bay leaves and water or stock.

Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and then lower the heat to medium. Cook for 45 minutes, until the lentils are tender.

Serve hot, with more olive oil and plenty of vinegar.

 


Happy New Year! Whether it’s new-year-new-us, or new-year-old-us, we are extremely happy to be getting back to cooking wholesome, simple meals. We very much enjoyed the extravagant Christmas and New Year’s lunches and dinners, but there is something really comforting in simple foods that feel good for our bodies.

So we are kicking off 2022 with a much loved recipe.

Black eye beans cooked with greens (usually spinach) is a classic dish in Greek cuisine. Our small black eye beans are harvested every year in organic farms in northern Greece. They are also perfect simply boiled and served with herbs and plenty of lemon. Here, we’ve kept it simple, using just a bit of onion and a bay leaf to flavour the dish. You can use spinach or any other seasonal greens that you prefer. This dish can also be served hot or at room temperature and makes for a wonderful lunch the following day. If you’ve been following this blog, then you’ll know how much we love such versatile dishes.

So from all of us at Oliveology, have a healthy, happy New Year, filled with delicious food and your loved ones!

Serves 2
150g black eye beans
1 bay leaf
1 large onion
2 tbsp olive oil
200g spinach leaves
salt, pepper (to taste)

Place your beans in a medium-sized pot with fresh water. Add the bay leaf. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium, cover and let the beans cook for 30’, until tender but not mushy. Drain and set aside.

Finely chop your onion.

In a large skillet, and over medium-low heat, gently fry the onion with the olive oil, until transluscent, around 5 minutes.

Add the cooked beans and spinach leaves and stir everything together, adding a few splashes of water.
Season with salt and pepper.

Cook everything together for 10-15 minutes, until the beans are tender and the spinach is wilted.

Serve hot or at room temperature.


Ladolemonο, literally meaning olive oil and lemon, is perhaps the most classic Greek dressing. You can find it in many tavernas and households, as most Greeks love the taste of olive oil and lemon. As with most dressings, this can be used in a variety of dishes, for instance in green salads or poured over roasted vegetables.

But our favourite way to use ladolemono is alongside fish. But not any fish. In Greek cooking, fish is often prepared-and consumed whole, and ladolemono is served on the side, so that each person can pour the desired amount on their plates. Often, when ladolemono is served with fish, the lemon rinds are kept to clean the fish odour from the plates, after the meal is over. A truly no-waste recipe!

As this is a dressing without many ingredients, choose your olive oil and lemons carefully. Get the best you can afford. We recommend using our 18 olive oil. This exceptional oil is the first olive oil of the season, made from unripe olives when they are still small and green. It is a truly superior olive oil with a smooth, silky texture and warm, fruity and peppery aromas, which is perfect for this recipe.

Serves 2

4 tbsp lemon juice (from one lemon)
8 tbsp olive oil (plus more, to taste)
salt, to taste

Place the lemon juice in a bowl. Slowly pour in the olive oil and whisk together until emulsified. Season with salt.

There’s quite a bit of lemon in this dressing, so if you prefer a more subtle lemon flavour, then add a bit more olive oil, around 4 tbsp more.


This week we’ve got a classic Greek winter recipe for you. Lahanorizo, literally meaning cabbage-rice, is perhaps one of the most comforting dishes in Greek cuisine. It is made with slowly cooked cabbage, carrots and rice, and served with plenty of olive oil and lemon. This mellow vegan stew is a classic in Greek households. It is only made in the winter, as soon as the first cabbages appear at the market.

For this recipe you need rice that’s high in starch, so we’ve used our Carolina rice. It is organic and comes from a small cooperative in the area of Grevena in the northern part of Greece.

This dish is perfect served hot, but also makes for an excellent lunch the following day, served at room temperature.

Serves 6 with leftovers
3 onions
6 tbsp olive oil (plus more, to serve)
1 cabbage, around 1.2kg
4 large carrots
200g Carolina rice
salt, to taste
a small bunch of parsley
lemon juice (to serve)

Finely chop the onions. Place the onions in a large pot with the olive oil and gently fry over medium heat, until translucent but not caramelised.

Shred the cabbage and grate the carrots. Add to your pot with one cup of water and cook until the cabbage is wilted, around 15 minutes. Add the rice and 3 cups of water, and season with salt. Cover the pot and cook until the rice is cooked through and the vegetables are soft, around 30 min.

Finely chop the parsley and add to your pot. Stir and let it cook for another 5 minutes.

Serve with plenty of lemon juice and more olive oil.


A few weeks back, a delicious dip was brought to us by a small cheeseroom in Kozani, Northern Greece. This is Riganati, they told us. Rigani is the Greek name for oregano, so we immediately knew that we would love it, as we love all-things oregano. The dip, made with creamy feta cheese, olive oil and oregano brought back many childhood memories of my grandmother. Whenever we had lunch at her house she would take a piece of feta cheese, crumble it with her fork, then pour over some olive oil and sprinkle some oregano. She would mash up everything together and we would have it with crusty bread.

So from my grandmother’s table and Northern Greece, this is our own version for this delicious dip, which you can serve as is, or dilute it with a bit of milk and pour over pasta or roasted vegetables (yes, broccoli loves this!).

For this, we used our organic feta cheese, a classic Greek feta cheese made from organic sheep’s and goats’ milk, in the Peloponnese. It is a bright cheese, soft in the mouth with a buttery and slightly peppery aftertaste, perfect for this dish. Also awarded PDO status! But you can use a more mature feta cheese if you prefer, for a more complex flavour.

Serves 5

250g feta cheese
125g milk
2tsp olive oil (plus more for serving)
Ground oregano (to taste)

In a small saucepan, heat up the milk until warm but not boiling. In a food processor add the feta cheese, olive oil and the warm milk and blend everything together until smooth. Add a few pinches of ground oregano, blend everything together again. Taste and add more oregano if needed.

This will set in the fridge but you can dilute it with a bit more milk if desired. Serve with plenty of olive oil and crusty bread.


The 28th of October is the Greek national holiday, known as the Ohi Day. It commemorates the rejection of the Mussolini ultimatum by the Greek PM Metaxas, which resulted in Greece joining WWII. The day is widely celebrated all around Greece, and though there are no traditional dishes served on this day, it’s usually a time for the family to come together.

So this week, we’ve prepared something sweet for you, a beloved Greek traditional dessert called portokalopita. Portokalopita, literally meaning orange – pie, is a fascinating dessert. It’s made both with cake batter and filo pastry, and (!) an orange-sugar syrup drizzled on top (using the same technique as in the classic baklava). The result, as you can imagine is spectacular. It’s moist and aromatic, and extremely satisfying.

The cake batter is made with oil and while the classic recipe uses sunflower oil, we prefer using olive oil, as it adds depth and flavour.

Serves 12

For the cake
225g olive oil (plus more for the cake dish)
225g sugar
225g Greek yoghurt
2 tsp baking powder
3 eggs
3 oranges (zest)
400g filo pastry
3 tbsp semolina or flour (for the cake dish)

For the syrup
500ml water
500gr sugar
250ml orange juice
1 orange, sliced (optional)

fresh bee pollen (to serve)

Thaw your filo (if from frozen). Shred your filo into large pieces and scatter on a large baking dish. Let it dry for a couple of hours. You can do this step the night before.

As your filo is drying, prepare the syrup. In a medium-sized pot, add the water, sugar, orange juice and sliced orange and stir everything together. Place your pot over medium-high heat and warm up the suryp, until the sugar has dissolved, 2-3min. Boil for another couple of minutes, remove from the heat and let cool.

Preheat your oven at 180C

In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs and sugar until white and fluffy. Using a spatula or wooden spoon, mix in the olive oil, baking powder, yoghurt, orange zest. Stir well until everything is combined.

Grease a large cake tin (30cm) with olive oil and dust some semolina flour all around. Lay the dried filo. Pour over your cake batter and using your hands gently toss everything together. You can do this in your bowl and then transfer to the cake tin if you prefer.

Bake at 180 for 30minutes or until your cake is cooked through. Remove from the oven and using a ladle, immediately pour over the cold syrup, one ladle at a time. It may look a lot, but worry not, your portokalopita will magically slowly absorb it all.

Decorate with the orange slices and bee pollen.
You can serve it immidiatley or ideally wait a few hours. It keeps well in the fridge.

 


It’s just past the middle of October and autumn is in full swing. The weather is unpredictable – often too unpredictable, and it’s time for warm, comforting soups. If you’ve been reading our newsletter you will know that we love soups!

And for many Greeks, the best soup is the soup with avgolemono! What is avgolemono?

The word literally means egg and lemon, and it is exactly that: an egg-lemon mixture that turns any soup into a wholesome, lemony bliss. Lemon is one of the key flavours of Greek cuisine, and avgolemono is perhaps one of the favourite ways to enjoy it.

Many use avgolemono in soups (it’s excellent with a chicken soup!), or in other classic Greek dishes such as lahanodolmades (stuffed cabbage leaves), and of course, in the Easter mageiristsa offal soup.

Avgolemono requires patience and passion, the foundation for any good creation. The technique entails passionately beating the eggs and lemon juice until frothy, and then patiently tempering the mixture by slowly pouring part of your hot soup into the cool egg mixture, so that its temperature slowly rises. That way, avgolemono and soup will be in similar temperatures and their coming together will be peaceful.

In my family, we add a bit of corn-flour to thicken the avgolemono, but you can omit that if you prefer.

Serves 2

2 eggs
2 lemons, juiced (approx.. 6-8 tbsp)
2 tbsp corn-flour (optional)
warm soup of your choice

In a bowl whisk the eggs until very frothy, around 3 minutes. Add the lemon juice and corn-flour (if using) and whisk until combined.

Using a ladle, very slowly add some broth from your soup to the avgolemono, constantly whisking. You should pour a few drops at first, then a few teaspoons at a time, then more as you go along. Use your senses to check the avgolemono’s temperature: dip your finger in, or a spoon and taste it. It’s ready when it’s as hot as your soup.

When the avgolemono and broth have reached the desired temperature, add it to your soup pot and stir for a couple of minutes.

Serve immediately.


This recipe belongs to Frantzeska and Froso, two women from the island on Tinos and were featured in the Greek cooking magazine Gastronomos, in a wonderful issue dedicated to old recipes from all over Greece.

The ingredients for this cake are fascinating, as there were no eggs, butter or sugar. The recipe calls for olive oil (you know that us Greeks love baking with olive oil, remember Mrs Kalliopi’s Olive Oil Cake?), which as the two women say can be replaced with tahini. Instead of sugar or honey, grape molasses are used, even though you can also use any leftover syrup from the traditional spoon sweets, for example from this grape spoon sweet. But grape molasses is one of our favourite ingredients to use, and our product of the month for September, so we couldn’t but give it a try. The result truly surprised us. This wonderful cake, with flavours that remind us of Fanouropita, or Petimezopita filled the house with warm, autumn smells. Expect a moist cake with a remarkable depth of flavours.

Frantzeska and Froso add some sesame on top of the batter before baking the cake, but we decided to swap the sesame for our tahini, and created these lovely swirls.

Serves 6
50ml olive oil (plus more for your baking dish)
250ml grape molasses
45ml tsipouro
½ lemon zest and juice, divided
½ tsp baking soda
½ tbsp ground cinnamon
¼ tsp ground cloves
200g all-purpose flour (plus more for your baking dish)
2 tbsp tahini
Cinnamon (to serve)

Preheat your oven at 180C.

In a medium-sized bowl whisk together the olive oil, grape molasses, tsipouro and lemon zest.

In a mug add the lemon juice (about 2 tbsp) and the baking soda and carefully stir. It will foam, be prepared.

Add it to your bowl, along with the flour and spices, and whisk until just combined.

Grease your baking dish with olive oil and coat it with some flour, so that your cake doesn’t stick. Add the batter.

Add a few dollops of tahini all around the batter and using a wooden skewer or knife, swirl it through the batter.

Bake at 180C until the cake is cooked through, for 30-40min. You can test if your cake is done by inserting a knife at the centre. It should come our clean.

Serve with cinnamon!


This week we’ve got a very special recipe for you. It is by Mrs Kalliopi, Marianna’s mother. We’ve shared many of her recipes in the past (have you tried her delicious flaounes?) and we absolutely love her food.

Mrs Kalliopi, along with Marianna made a traditional Greek pudding, called Moustalevria. Moustalevria, literally meaning Grape Must & Flour, is a pudding made in early autumn, as the grape must (moustos in Greek) is in abundance during that time. If you don’t have access to grape must, then you can use grape molasses (or petimezi in Greek) which is concentrated grape must. Simply dilute it with a bit of water. This recipe also uses honey instead of sugar, which adds depth and warmth!

Marianna, who comes from the Peloponnese garnishes moustalevria with crushed walnuts. In other regions, sesame is used. But regardless of your selection of nuts or seeds, plenty of cinnamon is a must.

Serves 5

125ml grape molasses (petimezi) (half a bottle of our petimezi)
500ml water
100g honey (you can add more If you want it sweeter, taste as you go along)
25g flour
25g corn flour dissolved in ¼ cup of cold water
Cinnamon (to serve)
Walnuts or sesame (to serve)

In a medium-sized pot and over medium high heat warm up the grape molasses, water and honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Bring it to a boil and then immediately lower the heat.

Dissolve the corn flour in ¼ cup of cold water and add to the mixture, along with the flour. Stir constantly until it thickens into a creamy texture, for 5-10minutes. You can add a bit more corn flour if you prefer a thicker moustalevria, or even replace much of the flour with the corn flour.

Place your moustalevria in 5 bowls and let it cool down. Place it in the fridge for a few hours and serve cold, or at room temperature.