Fresh herbs are a bliss. Surely, dried ones are easier to store and they don’t need any attention or care. But those of you who are lucky enough to have balconies or even gardens, well, grow some herbs! There is nothing better than freshly cut basil for your tomatoes, or woody rosemary for your roasted lamb. If you are not into taking care of pots of fresh herbs it’s not the end of the world. Most of us can now access fresh herbs at our local market or shops.

There are so many things you can do with herbs. This week, we have something different for you. It is summer after all and as such, foods that don’t require an oven are always welcome. When these foods also happen to be sweet and cold, it’s even better. Have you guessed where we are going with that?

Granita of course! Granita is different than sorbet in that it has a crunchier texture. Ice crystals form because of its preparation method (you’ll see below). Which means it is also easier to make and requires no special equipment! It is kinda like making tea and freezing it if you think about it. It can be eaten as an ice cream, served in glasses, but also as a slush-type drink. If you want, you can spike it with the alcohol of your choosing and there you have it, your very own summer cocktail.

For 2 people you will need:
A small bunch of basil (30g), leaves and tender stalks only
200ml water
150g orange blossom honey
3 medium-sized lemons (both zest and juice)

Finely chop the basil leaves or whiz them in a blender with the water.

In a small pot, and over medium heat warm up the water, basil and honey. Bring it to a boil and then turn off the heat and let it steep for 5 minutes. Add your lemon zest and juice. Taste. Have in mind that once frozen, the flavours will become less intense. However, the mixture needs to feel balanced. If you feel it needs more honey, lemon, or even basil add some now.

At this stage, you are faced with a deeply existential choice. To strain or not to strain. If you think about it, it is quite similar to soups. Do you prefer pureed soups like our trahana cream one or the fall pumpkin one? Or do you prefer soups with texture, like our spring one  or the saffron tahinosoupa? The writer’s personal preference is texture. But of course we tried both. And yes, the writer’s own personal preference is still texture.

So strain (or please don’t) the mixture into a clean metal tray. Place your tray in the freezer. Ever half and hour or so remove it from the freezer and using a fork, scrape the semi-frozen liquid around. You can keep tasting and if you feel there is something you’d like to add, you can still do so. Just make sure to stir it all in. After around two hours the granita should be set and you should be ready for the herby bliss.


Malva is thought to come from the Greek word for soft –malake. Mallow has been known since the ancient years for its medicinal uses. Hippocrates used mallow to remedy bruises and blood loss. Its properties include antiphlogistic, astringent, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, laxative, salve. The herb is also known for treating the digestive and urinary system as well as the intestinal system.

Enjoy your mallow tea with some honey in order to remove your body’s toxins. How to prepare it: Add a couple of teaspoons of dried mallow leaves in a cup with hot water for 7-10 mins, strain it and it’s ready to enjoy. It is recommended to drink 2-3 cups per day.

Also, when combined with chamomile and thyme honey, it’s a great cure for sore throats and coughs. When used externally -as a poultice- ιτ soothes the calluses and when dissolved in water it makes a quite relaxing foot bath. When mixed with olive oil, it can treat various insect bites or stings. The herb is frequently used as main ingredient for soaps or creams, as well as green and yellow dyes.

Buy our organic Greek Mallow

Important note:

Some herbs should be avoided if you are pregnant, trying to conceive or if you suffer from certain medical complaints. Unrestricted use of some herbs (such as rosemary, sage, sorrel and thyme) may be harmful to health. For further information and recommended dosage please consult a qualified practitioner.


Strongly aromatic and slightly bitter, absolutely essential to your Hummingbird cocktail, or for your pork or poultry stuffing. Or if you are of a more alternative persuasion, burning it cleans the negative energy from your environment.

Sage has remained a widely appreciated herb throughout the centuries due to its connection with wisdom and longevity and its therapeutic properties. Known since antiquity, it is depicted on the Minoan frescos in Knossos. Ancient Greeks used sage as a body and mind toner and in case of snake bites. To the Romans, it was considered a sacred herb, that was only collected by a designated person. It was so highly regarded by the Chinese in the 17th century, that Dutch merchants found the Chinese would exchange three chests of tea for one chest of sage leaves.

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Oregano has been recognized for its medicinal and aromatic properties since ancient times. Its name comes from the Greek words oros (mountain) and ganos (joy). Oregano has been one of the main ingredients in Mediterranean cuisine and part of the lifestyle for centuries. Newlyweds in ancient Greece and Rome were crowned with a laurel of oregano. It is a rich source of Vitamin K and antioxidants and contains fiber, iron, manganese, vitamin E, iron, calcium, omega fatty acids and manganese. It has also shown powerful antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. No one can imagine a proper Greek salad without a generous amount of the dried herb sprinkled on top. And no one should have it without Oliveology’s aromatic and flavoursome oregano.