Skordalia is a traditional Greek dip, made with raw garlic, “skordo” as is its name in Greek. It is eaten every year on the 25th of March, the Greek Independence Day, alongside battered fried cod. It is also a classic dish found on every taverna. It accompanies boiled beetroot or green beans, fried zucchini or aubergine.

The classic recipe calls for olive oil, vinegar and either stale bread soaked in water or boiled potato. Sometimes nuts are also added. There are of course many variations and each household has its own loved version of the dish.

As spring is coming to an end, young garlic is all around us. So this week we’re making skordalia, but with a few twists. This is a recipe adapted from a 1989 calendar with traditional Greek recipes and comes from mainland Greece. We are adding fresh spinach, which gives a wonderful green colour, and almond butter, for a nutty take on the classic dish. Our smooth almond butter is made purely from organic, raw almonds, with no added salt or any preservatives. It is the ideal way to get all the nutrients from nuts! Feel free to use whatever type of garlic you prefer; wild garlic leaves would also work great here.

We are using our favourite Ergani olive oil, which has a robust, rich flavour and our white wine vinegar for that gentle kick.

Serves 6

100g stale bread (we used white sourdough)
100g spinach leaves (1 cup)
100g almond butterraw almonds or other nuts
2 cloves of garlic
130g olive oil
2 tbsp white wine vinegar
salt, more olive oil and vinegar to taste

Soak the bread in water for a few minutes until soft. Squeeze out all excess water and place it in a food processor.

Add the spinach, almond butter, garlic and vinegar and pulse everything together, slowly adding the olive oil.

You should have a thick homogenous mixture.

Season with salt, adding more olive oil and vinegar to taste.


The inspiration for this recipe came to us from the classic Greek winter salad: boiled broccoli and cauliflower. This is a simple salad that usually accompanies fish, or other main dishes. Broccoli and cauliflower are cut in large pieces, boiled and then served with olive oil and lemon juice. It is very seasonal and in many households it is the salad which replaces the summer Greek salad.

So after a short trip to the market this week, we bought wonderful winter vegetables and decided to boil them, just like in the classic recipe. But of course, we will kick it up a notch. We’re adding our marinated artichoke hearts with leeks, olive oil and sunflower oil. They are perfect to enjoy on their own, but here, they completely transform our vegetables!

Often, recipes call for draining the artichokes -remember our tomato rice from a few weeks ago? It is, however such a pity to let all all this amazing flavoured olive oil go to waste. So we have decided to use it instead of a dressing! And of course, our beloved feta cheese turns this salad into a wonderful lunch! Add a few splashes of lemon juice or vinegar and you’ve got yourselves a delicious – and very easy to make- winter salad! An ode to the classic one.

Serves 2

1 small head of broccoli
1 small head of cauliflower
½ jar marinated artichoke hearts (in their oil)
150g feta cheese
salt, lemon juice or white wine vinegar (to serve)

Cut the broccoli and cauliflower in large florets. Place them in a large pot and cover with water. Boil for a few minutes, until you’ve reached your desired tenderness. We boiled ours quite a bit, to have the same texture as the buttery artichoke hearts, but you can also simply blanch them by submerging them for a few minutes in boiling water. Drain and set aside.

While the vegetables are still warm, place in a large bowl. Add the artichokes and their oil. Toss everything together until the vegetables are coated in the olive oil. Crumble the feta cheese and add to the salad.

Serve warm, with salt if desired and lemon or vinegar.

 


This week we’ve got a very fresh, summery recipe from Ligia from TheDaringKitchen. Ligia shares our passion for fresh, healthy food – with a Greek twist of course! You can check out many of her recipes here, and of course follow her on instagram. So here it is, words and recipe by Ligia, right below. Enjoy!

Summer is here, which means fresh produce abounds! Make the most of the season’s finest veggies with this summery Greek Kale Salad. It’s filled with briny kalamata olives, juicy tomato, sweet onion, creamy feta, and finished with a simple vinaigrette flavoured with fresh oregano.

The salad is best if it’s left to marinate for a few minutes before serving. This softens up the kale, making it a bit more digestible and flavourful. It also uses two kinds of kale for a bit of flavour and textural variation, but you can always use just one, depending on what’s available near you.

Serves: 4
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 0 minutes
Total time: 10 minutes

Dressing:
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh oregano, minced
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove, minced
Cracked black pepper, to taste
Kosher salt, to taste

Salad:
1 bunch curly kale, de-stemmed and torn into bite-sized pieces
1 bunch lacinato kale, de-stemmed and torn into bite-sized pieces
1 tomato, sliced
½ white onion, sliced
¼ cup Kalamata olives
½ cup crumbled feta cheese
Fresh oregano, minced, for garnish

In a large serving bowl, whisk together the olive oil, vinegar, oregano, mustard, oregano, garlic, pepper, and salt.

Add the kale, tomato, and onion. Toss to coat fully in the dressing.

Let the salad sit for at least 10 minutes, tossing occasionally.

Toss in the olives and feta cheese, just before serving.

Enjoy your salad!


Roasted red peppers really are the easiest thing to make. Don’t get us wrong, we love the jarred ones equally. Our organic Florina peppers are cooked over open flame. And this specific variety of Florina peppers is famous for its rich and sweet flavour! But as we now have a bit more time, we decided to go ahead and cook things we don’t ordinary prepare. And this recipe works well with any type of peppers you’ve got.

Roasted red peppers are excellent when stuffed with rice, shrimps, mince meat and of course, feta cheese! Finely chop them and add in sauces, salads, pasta and risotto for a boost of flavour. Blend them with some extra virgin olive oil and make your own dip.

10 large red florina peppers (around 1kg)
3 tbsp aged balsamic vinegar or sweet balsamic chilli vinegar
1/3 cup olive oil

Pierce the red peppers all around with a fork. Make sure you do not skip this step!

Remove the tops and gently tap the peppers so that you remove all seeds as well.

If you have a gas stove, you can roast them directly over the gas flame. Turn them around regularly for 10min or so, depending on how large your peppers are, until there are charred bits all around and the flesh is soft when pierced with a fork.

If you are using a conventional oven, place the pierced peppers in a baking tray and bake at 160C (no fan) for about half an hour, or until tender.

Remove from the gas flame or oven and place in a bowl. Cover with cling film and let the peppers steam a bit, until they are still warm, but cool enough to handle. Using your hands or a small knife, remove the skins and discard.

Place the pepper flesh in a jar, tupperwear or serving platter and add the olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Keep in the fridge.


One thing we love about veg boxes, is that you never know what you will get. For the last couple of weeks we’ve been getting nettles. Last week we made a spinach pie, adding the nettles for a different twist. This week however, we got two bunches. So we thought, let’s make pesto!

If you are following our recipes, you will know by now how we love making pesto. I don’t know if I’ve written this before, but realising that you can make pesto using anything you’ve got around was life-changing for me. So in the past we’ve made a pistachio pesto, a sun-dried tomato pesto with almonds, and the uber-seasonal wild garlic pesto!

One must be careful when handling nettle, as this lovely green can sting. The way we usually go about with nettle, is blanching it for a few minutes, and then use it in recipes such as pies, or in this pesto here. That way, it will not sting you. But do use gloves beforehand, to separate the leaves.

Makes one jar

2 bunches of nettle
¾ cups olive oil
½ cup raw nuts (we used walnuts, but pistachios are great too! – you can use whatever you have)
2 tsp white wine vinegar or 2 tsp lemon juice (or one of each)
salt (to taste)

Using gloves, separate the nettle leaves and thin stems.
Place in a large pot with boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain and let cool.
Place the nettles in a clean tea towel and squeeze out all excess water. You should be left with 1 cup of nettle pulp.

In a large frying pan, dry-toast the walnuts and let cool.

Whiz together the nettle, olive oil, walnuts. Season with salt. Add the vinegar or lemon juice (we used a teaspoon of each), and whiz again until smooth. Taste and adjust for salt or acidity.

Serve with pasta, veg or simply crusty bread!


How are you all doing? Most of us around the world are at home these days. To avoid going out, and support local producers many of us at Oliveology go for small veg boxes, brought to us by local farmers. And somehow every week we end up with more carrots than we can grate in salads.

Enter the inspiration for this recipe, so this week we decided to go for a dip. I personally prefer chunkier dips than smooth- and when it comes to root vegetables like carrots, I very much savour their natural sweetness. After making plenty of dips the last few years, the very much loved tahini and yoghurt, or the cheese & yoghurt one, dips with mixed pulses or pistachios, beetroot and oregano and of course, the classic greek ones tzatziki and melitzanosalata, this week we’re going for carrot.

You see, carrot and tahini are really good friends. We are not going to lie, this recipe takes a while. But it can be done in stages over a day or so. Spending more time at home offers this luxury.

Makes one large bowl.

800g carrots
6tbsp olive oil
2 tsps dried thyme
1tbsp grape molasses
1tbsp balsamic vinegar
salt

120ml olive oil
4 tbsp lemon juice or vinegar
1tbsp grape molasses
4tbsp tahini
150ml water
sesame seeds (to serve)

Preheat the oven at 180C.

You can peel the carrots if you want, but we just scrubbed them and removed the tops. Roughly cut the carrots in small pieces. We went for buttons, the size of your small finger.
Toss them together with the olive oil, grape molasses, vinegar, thyme and salt and place in a baking tray.

Bake for half an hour, until caramelised, but not tender. Add a cup of water and keep baking for another half hour, adding water if needed, until the carrots are tender and there’s a bit of liquid left in your baking tray.

Remove from the oven and let them cool.

Whizz together the carrots with the olive oil, lemon juice, grape molasses and tahini, adding a bit of water to loosen up the mixture if needed. Season with salt. Now, it’s time you made it your own. Do you want to go for something nuttier? Drizzle some more tahini. If you want it a bit sweeter (that’s me!), go for grape molasses. And for the more adventurous ones out there, we got you: just add more lemon juice, olive oil and salt.

Serve with more olive oil and with plenty of sesame seeds, if you’ve got.

 


With summer in full swing, this week we have for you a very fresh salad. It is great served cold, but equally delicious at room temperature. We are using bulgur wheat, an ingredient we love, as it turns all salads into filling, nutritious meals. Remember last year’s salad with almonds and prunes? Or the oven-baked bulgur wheat with feta cheese and tomatoes?

And we can’t think of a better way to celebrate summer than with a selection of summer vegetables: Zucchini and green beans are at their best at this time of the year. And so is cucumber. And we loved using them raw in this recipe. Chop them into small pieces and add them to your salad for more crunch and freshness. Plenty of fresh herbs and a simple olive oil and vinegar dressing are all you need. It is summer after all, cooking should be very simple and enjoyable!

You can serve the salad with some yogurt, feta cheese, or roasted summer vegetables like aubergine.

Serves 4 as a main

Salad:
1 small onion
3 tbsp olive oil
100g bulgur wheat
1.5 cups of water
150g zucchini
150g green beans
1 cucumber
1 small bunch of dill
1 small bunch of coriander
1 large bunch of parsley

Dressing:
5 tsbp olive oil
3 tbsp white wine vinegar
salt

Finely chop the onion. Place the onion in the frying pan with the olive oil and over medium-low heat and cook until translucent. Add the bulgur wheat and stir until the bulgur is coated in olive oil. Add the water and cook until all the water is absorbed for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside until cool.

Finely chop all the herbs and place in a large bowl. Chop the zucchini, beans and cucumber in small bite-sized pieces and add them to your bowl. Add the bulgur wheat, season with salt and and mix everything together.

In a separate bowl whisk together the olive oil and vinegar. Dress the salad making sure that everything is coated with the dressing.

Serve immediately with more olive oil.

 


Did you hear the wonderful news about our 17°C olive oil?
Yes, it has been awarded with three stars, the highest accolade in Great Taste 2019!

We are σο excited and proud.

And of course, this week we couldn’t but create a recipe using our awarded olive oil. Cold extracted with fresh lemons, oranges and thyme, it has always been one of our go-to summer staples, perfect with grilled white fish, or drizzled over fresh vegetables. The salad we’ve created for you today uses a classic summer vegetable combination, but adding our 17 olive oil transforms these familiar flavours.

What is it, you may wonder? Tomatoes and corn, of course! We absolutely love cooking with fresh corn on the cob during the summer. Remember our zucchini, corn and feta salad made with our lemongrass and tarragon olive oil from last summer?

So go on, give it a try, cooking with fresh produce when in season is the most wonderful thing to do! And if you make any of our recipes do take a pic or two. We have an exciting competition coming up, more info soon to follow!

Serves 6
900g grape tomatoes
2 pieces of corn on the cob
1 large red onion

4 tbsp 17°C olive oil
2 tbsp white wine vinegar
a few pinches of dried thyme
salt

fresh herbs such as parsley (to serve)
lemon and orange wedges (to serve)

Following the same instructions as last year, place the corn in a large pot of salted water. Bring to the boil, then lower the heat to medium and cook until the kernels are tender, around 20 minutes. Remove and let cool. Once the corn is cool enough to handle, remove the kernels. To do so, place your corn vertically against your chopping board. Running the knife parallel to the corn, remove all kernels. They should fall on your board. Collect and place in a large bowl.

Cut your tomatoes in half lengthwise. Place in the bowl. Finely slice the onion. Toss everything together. Season with thyme and salt. Drizzle with the olive oil and vinegar and mix well.

Serve with lemon and orange wedges and fresh herbs.

 

 


Halloumi is in store! A few weeks ago, we received our amazing halloumi from Cyprus, made purely from goats’ milk. For some reason, I have associated halloumi with summer. I am not sure why, it is equally tasty during winter: grated into pies, placed on top of winter vegetables and roasted in the oven, or as part of our winter salads. But this season somehow makes me crave it even more.

When thinking what to pair it with, my mind went back to summers past. A few summers ago, I worked for a brilliant Greek chef called Chrysanthos Karamolegos. He is a larger-than-life man, full of creativity and love for Greek cuisine. A cosmopolitan creature, he always takes unusual ingredients and puts them together, resulting in the most amazing flavour combinations. The recipe we have today for you is from my memories of his flavours, of my time with him, memories of life-changing culinary experiences that made life sparkle, bite after bite.

So if during summer, like me, you sometimes lose yourself in the slower pace of life, in the heat, or in the holidays away from home, this recipe is to remind us that there is always a bite of food that can let the light in.

Serves two as main
250g halloumi cheese
500g very cold cold melon
3 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp honey
3 tsp white vinegar
1 red chilli
a few fresh basil leaves

Cut the melon into bite-sized pieces. In a bowl, mix together the remaining olive oil, honey and vinegar. Finely chop the chilli and basil leaves. Add to your dressing. Toss together the melon and dressing and place on a plate. Slice the halloumi into thick slices and grill in a frying pan or griddle, using 1 tsbp of olive oil. Place the grilled halloumi on top of your melon and serve immediately. Enjoy!

 

 


Is it summer yet? The weather might be a bit confusing still, but we can’t help but feel that one of our favourite seasons is here. We kicked off June (and summer!) with our Greek Islands Cooking Workshop, where we got to taste and make amazing island recipes and wines. Our wonderful chef, Lida shared her passion for island foods, and –sneak peak to September-she is preparing another ‘island’ workshop! A Cretan one this time. Watch this space for updates on this and our other cooking workshops!

So this week, we have the ultimate summer recipe for you: a Horiatiki, also known as Greek salad. But with a twist. If you are looking for something refreshing and filling for those warm summer days or nights, look no further. Our bulgur wheat horiatiki is our go-to summer dish.

In the recipe below, you can cut the tomatoes, cucumber and onions in whichever way you like. We had plenty of time, so we went for small cubes. But if you are more rushed, then go for tomato wedges and roughly chop the cucumber and onions-it is equally delicious. And, as always, do not hesitate to add or omit ingredients! We’ve added fresh herbs for example. You adore feta? Double the quantity! You hate capers? Omit them. But not before you pop by our Borough Market shop to taste ours.

So get into the kitchen and let’s kick off this summer!

Serves 2:

100g bulgur wheat
4 tomatoes
1/2 cucumber
1 red onion
1 tbsp capers and
1/2 tub Kalamata olives or amfissa green olives (we used both)
Dried oregano (to taste)
5 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
100g feta cheese
a small bunch of fresh herbs (parsley, mint or dill – optional)
Salt

Place the bulgur wheat in 250ml of water in a medium-sized pot. Bring to the boil, then turn down the heat and let it cook until the water is absorbed. Remove from the heat and let it cool.

In the meantime, cut your tomatoes, cucumber and onion in small cubes. Place in a large bowl, along with the capers and olives. If using herbs, finely chop them and add them to the salad. Crumble the feta cheese on top. Add the cool bulgur wheat and oregano. Dress your salad with olive oil and vinegar and season with salt.

Serve with crusty bread. Happy summer everyone!