Summer is the time of the year when we try to avoid turning on the oven. We love simple recipes that can be eaten cold or at room temperature. So this week we’ve got a very unique dip for you. It’s great to bring to a summer barbecue or picnic. It also makes for a wonderful lunch, spread over toasted bread with some sliced cucumber on top.

We are making a yogurt and herb dip, with dakos rusks and walnuts! The inspiration for this recipe is from the book Herbs in Cooking by Maria and Nikos Psilakis.

We are using our walnuts and dakos rusks, which both add depth and texture to this dip. You can grind them until they resemble coarse sand, or alternative you can crush them with your hands, adding more texture to this dip.

This dip is packed with fresh and dried herbs. We love fresh parsley, together with dried oregano, but feel free to play around with different herbs. Definitely use our 21°C Olive Oil with Walnuts, Fennel, Rosemary & Oregano, which pairs perfectly with the dip’s flavours.

Makes one large jar

100g dakos rusks
50g walnuts
1 clove of garlic
small bunch of fresh parsley
250g yoghurt
1 tsp dried basil
1 tsp dried oregano
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
4 tbsp walnut oil, plus more for serving
2 tbsp water
salt, pepper

In a blender or using your hands grind or crush the dakos rusks and walnuts.

Grate the garlic and finely chop your parsley.

In a large bowl mix the yoghurt with the dried basil and oregano. Add the ground dakos and walnuts, parsley and garlic. Stir well. Add the vinegar and walnut oil, and a few splashes of water to loosen up the mixture (if needed). Taste and adjust for seasoning.

Let the dip stand for a couple of hours before serving so that the flavours develop. Serve with more walnut oil.


This week we have a very hearty recipe for you. Lentils and tomatoes are an all-time favourite and we couldn’t but pair them together in this simple, yet very comforting dish.

We are after all getting ready for summer, eagerly waiting for the first juicy summer tomatoes to appear in the market. So in this recipe, adapted from Jack Santa Maria’s cookery book Greek Vegetarian Cooking, we are using the vibrant red organic tomato passata to make a delicious lentil stew. It makes for an excellent dinner, served alongside brown rice. But also, it works great as a more filling pasta sauce. Don’t forget to check out all of our recipes with tomato passata.

Serves 2 as main

1 medium red onion
1 clove of garlic
2 tbsp olive oil
1 bottle tomato passata (or 2-3 juicy tomatoes, crushed)
500ml water (plus more if needed)
150ml red wine (we used the Barafakas Idea Red)
100g lentils
dried thyme (to taste)
dried oregano (to taste)
salt, pepper (to taste)
brown rice and fresh tomatoes (to serve)

Grate or finely chop your onion and garlic. In a medium-sized pot add the olive oil, onion and garlic. Gently fry over medium heat until translucent but not caramelised.

Add the tomato passata, water, wine and lentils and stir everything together. Add the thyme and oregano and season with salt and pepper.

Bring to a boil then lower the heat and cook, covered, until the sauce is thickened and the lentils are tender, around 45minutes. Half-way through taste and adjust for dried herbs and seasoning.

Serve with brown rice and fresh tomatoes (if desired).


A few weeks back, a delicious dip was brought to us by a small cheeseroom in Kozani, Northern Greece. This is Riganati, they told us. Rigani is the Greek name for oregano, so we immediately knew that we would love it, as we love all-things oregano. The dip, made with creamy feta cheese, olive oil and oregano brought back many childhood memories of my grandmother. Whenever we had lunch at her house she would take a piece of feta cheese, crumble it with her fork, then pour over some olive oil and sprinkle some oregano. She would mash up everything together and we would have it with crusty bread.

So from my grandmother’s table and Northern Greece, this is our own version for this delicious dip, which you can serve as is, or dilute it with a bit of milk and pour over pasta or roasted vegetables (yes, broccoli loves this!).

For this, we used our organic feta cheese, a classic Greek feta cheese made from organic sheep’s and goats’ milk, in the Peloponnese. It is a bright cheese, soft in the mouth with a buttery and slightly peppery aftertaste, perfect for this dish. Also awarded PDO status! But you can use a more mature feta cheese if you prefer, for a more complex flavour.

Serves 5

250g feta cheese
125g milk
2tsp olive oil (plus more for serving)
Ground oregano (to taste)

In a small saucepan, heat up the milk until warm but not boiling. In a food processor add the feta cheese, olive oil and the warm milk and blend everything together until smooth. Add a few pinches of ground oregano, blend everything together again. Taste and add more oregano if needed.

This will set in the fridge but you can dilute it with a bit more milk if desired. Serve with plenty of olive oil and crusty bread.


This week we’re really wishing we were on a Greek island, laying on the beach, having dinners by the sea, tasting all these delicious local delicacies Greek islands have to offer. So today’s recipe comes from the island of Kimolos. It lays somewhere between a deep dish pizza and a focaccia. But with no cheese and plenty of olive oil! It is perfect for this time of the year, when tomatoes are juicy and ripe. It is also a great addition to your barbecue or outdoor picnic.

For this recipe, you need an intense, robust olive oil, so we used our Ergani organic extra virgin olive oil. It is a classic olive oil made from ripe olives, produced on a small organic family farm in the Messinia region of the Peloponnese. This versatile olive oil has a full, traditionally rich flavour and tones of cut grass, fantastic for everyday use, and baking.

Serves 6

100ml (1/2 cup) warm water (not boiling)
50ml olive oil
1 sachet dried yeast (8gr)
1 tbsp sugar
1tsp salt
200g all-purpose flour

3 medium tomatoes
1 large red onion
2tsp dried oregano
4 tbsp olive oil+ 4tbsp for the pan
salt, pepper

In a large bowl place the warm water, olive oil sugar and yeast and stir to dissolve. Let it stand for 5 minutes until small bubbles start to form. Add the flour and mix until all the ingredients come together. Knead your dough for 7-10 minutes until smooth. Add a bit more flour if needed. Place your dough back in the bowl, dusting some flour at the bottom so that it doesn’t stick. Let it rest for an hour in a warm place. It should double in size.

In the meantime, preheat the oven at 200C.
Roughly chop the tomatoes and onions and place in a bowl with 4tbsp olive oil, salt pepper and oregano. Toss everything together and set aside.

Oil your baking tray (which, traditionally is rectangular) with 4 tbsp of olive oil and using your fingers, spread out your dough. Place the tomatoes and onions on top, but leave any liquid in the bowl.
(*you can actually eat it with a spoon it’s delicious!)

Drizzle a bit more olive oil and bake at 200C for around 40-45 minutes. You should have an airy dough, moist on top and crunchy at the bottom. Let it cool and serve.

 


Have you seen our delicious Greek meze box? It was created with the Greek summer in mind and is filled with Greek delicacies! Think of wonderful marinated artichoke hearts and tender roasted red peppers. A specially selected variety of Greek olives – amfissa green and kalamata! Bright sun-dried tomatoes, feta cheese and one other unique Greek cheese complete this wonderful box of goodies. Savour all these delicacies with crunchy kritsini breadsticks. The idea behind it is to just unbox, plate everything and there you have it, you are ready for a Greek meze feast.

But if you want to spice it up a notch, this week we’ve got our own meze recipe, for you to make at home, and share, along with all the other goodies! In this recipe, we are roasting peppers and onions with grape molasses. And the secret ingredient? We are adding roasted red peppers, which act as a condiment, offering depth and a hint of smoke!

4 large peppers (various colours)
2 large onions
2 large cloves of garlic
100g roasted red peppers
3 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp grape molasses
1 tsp spices of your choice (we used ¼ tsp of chilli, ½ tsp smoked paprika and ¼ tsp cumin)
1 tsp dried oregano
salt, pepper (to taste)

Preheat the oven at 200C
Remove the stem and core from the peppers and discard. Cut each pepper in eight large pieces.
Peel the onions and cut each onion in eight wedges. Peel and finely slice the garlic.
Finely slice the roasted red peppers.
Place all your vegetables in a baking tray.
Drizzle with olive oil and grape molasses and gently toss everything together. Season with the spices and oregano, salt and pepper. Toss again.

Bake at 200C for 30-45 minutes, tossing every 15 minutes, until the peppers are tender and slightly charred. Let cool.

Serve at room temperature with the rest of the goodies from the meze box!


For the third week in a row, we’ve got a very summery recipe from Amaryllis from The Tasty Other. Amaryllis is one of our favourite guest chefs in our dinner experiences cooking workshops. She has a pure love for food, a fascination with tradition and gatherings, and great passion about storytelling through photography. You can check out many of her recipes here, and of course follow her on instagram. So here it is, words and recipe by Amaryllis, right below. Enjoy!

Simple, straightforward and filled with flavour, this tomato salad comes together in mere minutes and is sure to be a summer staple, as a great alternative to the very popular Greek salad. It’s simply a variety of juicy tomatoes (try to use the best you can get your hands on, they will really make a difference), dressed in Oliveology’s best extra virgin olive oil, white balsamic, delicious petimezi (grape molasses) and a pinch of mildly spicy Aleppo chillies, and served with a big handful of sweet raisins and a generous dusting of dried oregano and lots of sea salt flakes.

Ingredients
20 cherry tomatoes (left whole, halved or quartered depending on their size)
3 medium tomatoes, cut in thick slices
1/3 cup Corinth raisins
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon grape molasses
1/2 teaspoons chilli flakes
A big pinch of sea salt flakes
1 teaspoon dried oregano

Method
Place the tomatoes and raisins in a salad bowl; put the olive oil, balsamic, grape molasses, salt & chilli in a jar (or bowl) and combine well.

Dress the salad, add the oregano and toss gently. Taste and adjust the salt, vinegar and chilli flakes to your liking.

Serve cold (but not straight from the fridge) with a big piece of aged feta and lots of crusty bread on the side.


One of our favourite routines during the summer has always been a weekly visit to the farmers’ market. Of course these days things are a bit more challenging and many of us prefer to stay at home and have our vegetables delivered to us. Nonetheless, I’m sure that all of us have by now managed to source lovely seasonal produce, one way or another.

And summer is the season for aubergine, courgettes, peppers! So this week we’ve thought of an easy way to prepare all these colourful vegetables, and turn them into a very filling summer dish! As with most of our summer recipes, this is great served hot, but you can also enjoy it at room temperature, and yes, it’s excellent eaten cold too! For this recipe we’ve used various of our dried herbs. They are organic and wild, hand picked from the mountains of Epirus, in the north-west Greece. They add a wonderful complexity to our vegetables. And to make this dish quite filling, this week we’re cooking with our favourite bulgur wheat. Remember last year’s bulgur summer salad, or our take on the Greek salad with bulgur wheat? It’s an ingredient we absolutely love!

Serves 4 as a side, or 2 as a main

100g bulgur wheat, plus 1.5 cups of water
3 peppers, approx. 250g (we used colourful ones)
2 courgettes, approx. 250g
1 aubergine, approx. 250g
4 tbsp olive oil
2 tsp dried herbs (oregano, thyme, spearmint, basil, we used ½ tsp from each)
zest and juice from ½ lemon
1 tsp white balsamic vinegar with honey
100g feta cheese

Place the bulgur wheat and water in a small pot and cook over medium heat until tender and all the water is absorbed, around 10-15min. Set aside.

Cut the courgettes and aubergine in small bite-sized pieces. Make sure they are all equal, so that they cook evenly. Cut the peppers in thin strips.

Toss the vegetables together with the olive oil and all the herbs and place in a baking tray, all in one layer.

Bake at 180C until tender and slightly charred, around 20’.

In a bowl toss together the bulgur wheat, roasted vegetables, lemon juice and zest, vinegar.

Serve with the crumbled feta cheese and more olive oil and vinegar to taste.


It’s all about tomatoes these days! The market is full of aromatic tomatoes, of various varieties, colours and sizes. In our June newsletter we had a selection of summer recipes with tomatoes for you.

Now. Are you ready for the simplest, yet most fascinating summer recipe ever? This week’s recipe was a spontaneous creation. Which, as most spontaneous creations go, ended up being spectacular.

The inspiration for this recipe was simply a half-full jar of sun-dried tomatoes.We often use sun-dried tomatoes in our recipes, and always keep a jar in the fridge. Our sun-dried tomatoes are organic, and come from a small Greek cooperative in Northern Greece. They are naturally dried in the sun, placed in large wooden trays with sea salt. They are then preserved in a delicious extra virgin olive oil with oregano, pepper, vinegar and bay leaves, which we will use in this recipe!

This is a recipe made with juicy summer tomatoes, but if you want to prepare this tomato sauce in the winter, you can use our tomato passata instead, which is made with fresh tomatoes picked now in the summer!

Makes 1 large jar

½ jar (100g) sun-dried tomatoes and their oil
2 tomatoes, or 400g tomato passata
½ teaspoon dried oregano
salt (to taste)

Cut the tomatoes in large pieces and place in a blender. Add the sun-dried tomatoes and their oil, oregano and salt. Whizz everything together until smooth. Taste and season with more salt if needed.

This makes for a delicious dip, which you can enjoy as is, with some crusty bread. You can also use it as a sauce, in your home-made pizzas, on top of Dakos rusks or bruschettas, add it in your gemista stuffing, and of course enjoy hot or cold with any pasta!

 


This week we’ve prepared a classic Greek dish for you. Oven baked gigantes beans is one of the most iconic Greek dishes. With a bit of crusty bread and feta cheese, it makes for an excellent, filling meal.

Of course, this recipe is not the classic one, but has a few interesting new twists. We’ve added a bit of grape molasses to add some sweetness and depth to the tomatoes. And what we are very excited about, we are serving it with our extra virgin olive oil & oregano essential oil!

This is a product that combines the unique health benefits of our Greek oregano organic essential oil with a special organic, extra virgin, cold pressed, single variety Greek olive oil. This unique food pairing tastes like the Greek sunshine. And it is perfect to enjoy with this classic Greek dish!

 

Serves four

5 tbsp olive oil
2 red onions
3 cloves of garlic
1 tbsp grape molasses
1 tsp dried oregano
200g giant beans, soaked overnight and boiled in plenty of water
1 bottle of tomato passata
salt
extra virgin olive oil & oregano essential oil (to serve)

Preheat your oven at 180C.

Finely slice the red onions and garlic. In a frying pan and over medium heat place the olive oil, onions and garlic. Cook until caramelised, for around 10-15 minutes, adding the grape molasses half way through.

Once caramelised, placed the onions, garlic and all the juices from the frying pan in an casserole. Add the beans, tomato passata, salt, dried oregano and 200ml of water. Bake covered for 20 min. Uncover and bake for another 20min, until the liquid has evaporated and you are left with a mellow bean stew.

Serve with plenty of extra virgin olive oil & oregano essential oil!


This week, our oregano oil producer Michalis Georgaras is writing about his new product, the amazing organic, extra virgin olive oil & oregano essential oil, awarded by the Health & Nutrition Committee of the World Olive Center for health with the Bronze standard of Excellence Award. We are very excited to read his story!

Sharing food is a ritual in Greece. It is a sacred time when family and friends gather around the table, share large platters of food, talk, fight and joke around. Indeed, food brings people together here in Greece. But we don’t just share food. Around the table we share feelings and ideas, our joys and sorrows. The most important social events, the warmest family gatherings, all of these happen over hearty meals. Food is the social glue that brings people together…and this is exactly how our new product came into being. We were inspired by this togetherness of people -and oils as a matter of fact.

The initial idea originated three years ago. We wanted to make a fine culinary product, an olive oil flavoured with the unique aroma of our oregano. Something that would be both tasty and with health benefits. It took us two years of intensive research to create what I consider to be the finest culinary oil I could possibly put together.

And it was food once again that brought people together. My wife Anastasia and myself started meeting olive oil producers from all over Greece and trying their best varieties of olive oil. After tasting over thirty different types of olive oil, some of the best our country has to offer, we found just what we were looking for:

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