Oregano might be a humble herb with a glorious name, nonetheless. In Ancient Greek, Ορίγανον: όρος+γάνος = η χαρά, η λάμψη του βουνού is the joy, the brightness of the mountain. Ancient Greeks would crown bridal couples with wreaths of oregano as a blessing of happiness upon their marriage.

Oregano is one of the most popular Mediterranean herbs and one of the foundations of Greek cuisine. Greece happens to be where the most praised varieties come from and Mount Taygetus is home to the most favoured of all Greek oreganos. The herb has been used since the antiquity as a food flavouring and medicine mostly for respiratory diseases.

Have you ever tried an herb called oregano not smelling or tasting like oregano as the authentic one? That is mostly because oregano is a wider category used to define nearly 50 plants available across the world that respond to a similar flavour profile. For example, you might have heard of Lippia graveolens, “Mexican oregano,” also known as Mexican marjoram or Mexican wild sage (not a true oregano), or Origanum vivens, “Spanish oregano” and Origanum majorana, “Sweet marjoram”. The authentic Greek Oregano is Origanum Vulgare sp. Hirtum that has been scientifically proven to have antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial properties, as well as very potent aroma and intense flavour. 

In Greek cuisine, the herb is used dried, usually; there’s always a jar full of it in the Greek home. Oregano is used in tomato sauces, with meats, fish, cheese, egg dishes, salads, cheeses, and with vegetables including tomatoes, mushrooms, onions, zucchini, and green beans. Combine it with minced garlic, sea salt, and olive oil and you have a flavourful marinade for pork, beef, or roasted potatoes.

The ancient Greeks were also the first to realize the amazing healing properties of oregano. It has powerful antibiotic, antifungal and antioxidant bacteria properties. It is used as a painkiller and anti- inflammatory. Oregano tea is considered a treatment to treat pain, colds, asthma, indigestion and fatigue. The leaves and flowering stems are natural antiseptics because of high thymol content. Oregano is rich in C, E, K, A vitamins, manganese, magnesium, calcium, niacin, zinc and iron among others.

This herb, rich in essential oils, pungent and peppery is quite sensitive when stored. We advise you in store it in glass containers; away from the heat and the sunlight but still, not in the fridge.

Make sure you buy your oregano from a trustworthy supplier. The recent years, a number of illegal harvesters have been stripping Greek mountains of wild herbs and rare plants.  We really hope this issue is solved as soon as possible as this looting stops natural regeneration, threatens delicate ecosystems and leaves entire mountainsides denuded.

In case you are growing the herb at your home, oregano protects the other plants from diseases and harmful ants. That is especially useful during summer, when mosquitos or other ants are hard to avoid.

Talking about the joy of cooking, have you seasoned your meal with oregano, today? Looking for inspiration? Oregano is a match in heaven with tomato, which is a match in heaven with feta which takes us to dakos, without a second thought.

Pop by our shop at Borough Market and smell our exceptional Greek oregano! We supply it in bunches or ground, hand harvested from the wild mountains of Epirus. The oregano as well as all of our wild herbs grow within the organically certified land of Mrs Maria. We also supply oregano oil, a premium pure essential oil produced in the organic farm Aetheleon This exceptional oil besides its culinary use as a food flavouring, it is widely acknowledged in the international scientific community for its strong antibiotic, antifungal and antioxidant properties.

Photo Credit: Aetheleon


We are thrilled to announce we were awarded a  SILVER MEDAL for 18oC organic evoo, which is a great honour for our producer. We are proud of this honourable distinction as 2016 was one of the most difficult years for Greek organic olive oil production.

The 22nd International Competition for Organic Olive Oil, PREMIO BIOL INTERNATIONAL 2017, is one of the top competitions for organic olive oil worldwide.

It took place in Italy, in the city of Ostuni, in the province of Brindisi, at the historical region of Apulia, known as the White City, from the 18th until the 20th of March 2017. Ostuni was destroyed by Hannibal and was rebuilt by the Greeks, who then named the city Astu neon, which means “New City” in Greek.

More than 350 organic olive oils were tasted in the competition,  from many countries such as Spain, Italy, Greece, Tunisia, Turkey, Portugal, Israel, Argentina, the U.S.A., Croatia, Morocco, etc. All of the organic olive oils were evaluated with blind tasting by expert olive oil panel tasters of international reputation.


When asked to name a case of a bud, more popular than the flower or even the fruit, which one comes to mind? I always think about the caper.

Capers are beautiful pea sized, dark green flower buds known since the Palaeolithic-era. In Ancient Greece, Hippocrates mentioned its expectorant properties; Dioscourides advised mouthwashes with an infusion made with capers boiled in vinegar. It was also believed that its skin had toning and aphrodisiac properties. The poet Antiphanis mentions capers as one of the spices along with sesame, cumin, thyme, marjoram, vinegar and olives.

The caper bushes are native to the Mediterranean and usually grow in rocky, dry areas. Other varieties can be found in other places of Europe, as well as Asia and Africa. They are categorised and sold by size. Their price is usually high, due to their laborious harvesting method: not only do they have to be hand-picked but also picking needs to take place quite early in the morning. Then, they are sun dried and either salted or pickled. The unpicked buds, bloom into white- pinkish flowers and in the evenings, they release a sweet, pleasant scent. In Greece the caper leaves are considered a delicacy and are usually added fresh in salads or pickled as mezze. When opportunity comes, do try them- you are in for a treat!

These spice buds with their piquant, salty and sour flavour as well as their floral aroma, act as flavour enhancers. They are great with fish, tomatoes and onions and are often used in conjunction with lemon. Widely used as a condiment or a flavourful garnish, they are essential to dishes like Santorini fava, puttanesca pasta, Nicoise salad, as well as in tartar and remoulade sauces.

Nutritional value wise, they are very low in calories and contain many phytonutrients, anti-oxidants (high in in flavonoid compounds rutin and quercetin) such as and vitamins essential for optimal health. We would advise you to pay special attention to their high sodium levels.

So, what are you waiting for? Treat yourselves to our organic and wild capers in olive oil (not brine); they are hand picked, prepared and packed for us with love, care and expertise by Mrs Love (Κα. Αγάπη) in Southern Crete!


Malva is thought to come from the Greek word for soft –malake. Mallow has been known since the ancient years for its medicinal uses. Hippocrates used mallow to remedy bruises and blood loss. Its properties include antiphlogistic, astringent, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, laxative, salve. The herb is also known for treating the digestive and urinary system as well as the intestinal system.

Enjoy your mallow tea with some honey in order to remove your body’s toxins. How to prepare it: Add a couple of teaspoons of dried mallow leaves in a cup with hot water for 7-10 mins, strain it and it’s ready to enjoy. It is recommended to drink 2-3 cups per day.

Also, when combined with chamomile and thyme honey, it’s a great cure for sore throats and coughs. When used externally -as a poultice- ιτ soothes the calluses and when dissolved in water it makes a quite relaxing foot bath. When mixed with olive oil, it can treat various insect bites or stings. The herb is frequently used as main ingredient for soaps or creams, as well as green and yellow dyes.

Buy our organic Greek Mallow

Important note:

Some herbs should be avoided if you are pregnant, trying to conceive or if you suffer from certain medical complaints. Unrestricted use of some herbs (such as rosemary, sage, sorrel and thyme) may be harmful to health. For further information and recommended dosage please consult a qualified practitioner.


Strongly aromatic and slightly bitter, absolutely essential to your Hummingbird cocktail, or for your pork or poultry stuffing. Or if you are of a more alternative persuasion, burning it cleans the negative energy from your environment.

Sage has remained a widely appreciated herb throughout the centuries due to its connection with wisdom and longevity and its therapeutic properties. Known since antiquity, it is depicted on the Minoan frescos in Knossos. Ancient Greeks used sage as a body and mind toner and in case of snake bites. To the Romans, it was considered a sacred herb, that was only collected by a designated person. It was so highly regarded by the Chinese in the 17th century, that Dutch merchants found the Chinese would exchange three chests of tea for one chest of sage leaves.

Continue reading →