The sun is shining. We are now officially in the beginning of summer. Summer is always better if one is by the sea. But most of us are not. So when one lives in a city, summer foods make it all better. Around the market you can now find watermelons. For us, it is the ultimate summer flavour. We spend the entire summer with this pink, sweet fruit. Eaten as is, straight from the fridge is dreamy. Some say it’s even better at room temperature. But you know, it’s summer, one wants something cold to balance the heat.

The last few years, recipes using watermelon are popping up. Think away from smoothies for a bit. Watermelon’s sweetness and crunch balances perfectly with something creamy and salty. You guessed it. Feta cheese and watermelon can become best friends!

And while in Greece usually watermelons are massive-a few kilos each- here, you can get a lovely small watermelon at the market for the salad we are suggesting.

This salad is quite simple. Went for the classic flavour combinations. Watermelon-feta cheese-mint. However, you can use whatever herbs you prefer. How about fresh coriander? Hm! The measurements for watermelon and feta are balanced, but you can obviously add more cheese if you want. Try it and see.

Here, we used our 18oC olive oil. Its grassy, fruity flavour is the perfect pairing for these ingredients.

And whatever you do, don’t forget the vinegar. It really makes all the difference, brightening up the entire dish. Something like the early summer sun, brightening up our lives. You can of course experiment more, add a bit of chilli for spice, lemon or lime for acidity.

For 2 people
400g of watermelon flesh
150g feta cheese
2 tbs olive oil
dashes of red wine vinegar
a few springs of mint
pepper

Remove the peel from the watermelon. Cut the flesh in cubes. We prefer large bite-sized pieces. Place in a bowl. Cut the feta cheese in identical cubes. Fine, they don’t really have to be identical. Add to the watermelon. Pour over olive oil and splashes of the red wine vinegar. Finely chop the mint and sprinkle on top. Add some freshly ground pepper.

This salad makes for a perfect summer lunch. We tried it for breakfast actually. Trust us, it works!


Although often associated with warmer, more exotic lands, the striking looking aubergine is widely cultivated in Britain. Aubergine (Solanum melongena) is botanically not a vegetable but a fruit, closely related to the tomato. Eggplant, or aubergine, is long prized for its beauty as well as its unique taste and texture. Aubergines are a good source of fibre and folic acid. The colour of the skin is a result of the presence of anthocyanins – compounds with antioxidant properties. In addition to featuring a host of vitamins and minerals, eggplant also contains important phytonutrients, many which have antioxidant activity.Rich in antioxidant properties, dietary fibre, copper, magnesium and vitamins B1 and B6 there is no wonder they are considered a nutritional “treasure”. In Greece is it widely used in many recipes including the famous Greek moussaka. Continue reading →


Refreshing and aromatic, strawberries are really hard to resist when fully ripe. They are considered to be Wimbledon’s favorite fruit. During the 2014 Championships alone some 28,000 kg of strawberries were served with fresh cream! The fruit has been growing in Europe since the Roman Times. It was in 1714 however that a French engineer’s trip to Chile and Peru led to the revelation that the Latin American variety of the fruit was much larger. He brought back some seeds and started cultivating them in France. The result was a large, juicy and sweet hybrid, the modern strawberry. It is rich in antioxidant properties, vitamins C and K and an excellent source of fibre, folic acid, manganese and potassium. Try soaking fresh strawberries in sugar and Oliveology’s organic white balsamic vinegar with honey for 30 minutes and serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.


We are so excited that summer solstice is approaching.

It is the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, during which the sun reaches the furthest point from the Equator and seems to be stopping for a while. Intertwined with ancient rituals, pagan traditions and century old customs, Summer Solistice has had a great impact on culture and civilisations. Stonehenge and the Avebury complex in Wiltshire, South West England, were erected around 5,000 years ago as monuments of this unique phenomenon. People still visit them en masse on that day to watch the sun rise in a festive atmosphere bursting with mystery and excitement. Others just enjoy the longest sunshine of the year by the sea or in parks having picnics. Continue reading →