Granola is of course not Greek. Growing up in Greece plain oats were available, but to my understanding I was the only weird kid at school who occasionally had porridge for breakfast. Unlike the UK, oats were not that popular in Greece. But let’s begin by what granola is and we will get to our Greek summer version. Granola is basically a mixture of oats, nuts, seeds and dried fruit, baked in the oven -you’ll see how right below.

So what makes this recipe a Summer Greek granola? Well, summery Greek ingredients and flavours. At the shop we just received some lovely dried nectarines. Plump and juicy, with a pink-peachy colour that makes you want to just look at them for hours. They are hand picked and air dried, with no added sugar or any bad oils. It’s just the fruit, really. The perfect ingredient to make granola, wouldn’t you say? Inspired by the Greek nectarines, we created this recipe for you this week.

I’ll give you the measurings in cups as it’s way easier to assemble your mixture that way. Also, this ain’t baking, so if you fancy adding more nuts, seeds or fruit go ahead. But this ratio is very balanced I find. Please don’t go for the blanched almonds, the ones with skin taste better. You can serve your granola with milk, kefir, yogurt and fresh fruit for a lovely summery breakfast.

For a large jar of granola you will need

2 cups of oats (200g)
½ cup chopped almonds (70g)
¼ cup pumpkin seeds
a few pinches of cinnamon
a pinch of salt
3 tbsp olive oil
3 tbsp honey
1 cup dried nectarines (120-150g)

Start by mixing your oats, almonds and seeds in a bowl and place them on a baking tray with greaseproof paper.

Then, in a separate bowl mix your olive oil, honey, cinnamon and salt (if your honey is not runny, warm it up a bit).

And now, for the fun part: Drizzle the olive oil/honey mixture on top and mix with oats (the olive oil and honey might not seem enough for that amount of oats, but it really is).

Very carefully make sure to mix everything really well using your fingers until everything is covered in olive oil/honey (you could use a spoon, but then you won’t be able to lick your fingers, you don’t want that).

Right, now for the baking: at 150C, stirring every 10min so that it evenly cooks.

Oh, and whatever you do, when you take the granola out of the oven to stir do not taste: Laugh not, it is very inviting, granola makes the house smell like honey and spice and everything nice but it will burn you (yes, I did get burnt, so be wiser).

So, after about 30-40min, when your granola is golden, remove from the oven and let it cool, mixing in your dried fruit after it’s cooled down.


Fresh herbs are a bliss. Surely, dried ones are easier to store and they don’t need any attention or care. But those of you who are lucky enough to have balconies or even gardens, well, grow some herbs! There is nothing better than freshly cut basil for your tomatoes, or woody rosemary for your roasted lamb. If you are not into taking care of pots of fresh herbs it’s not the end of the world. Most of us can now access fresh herbs at our local market or shops.

There are so many things you can do with herbs. This week, we have something different for you. It is summer after all and as such, foods that don’t require an oven are always welcome. When these foods also happen to be sweet and cold, it’s even better. Have you guessed where we are going with that?

Granita of course! Granita is different than sorbet in that it has a crunchier texture. Ice crystals form because of its preparation method (you’ll see below). Which means it is also easier to make and requires no special equipment! It is kinda like making tea and freezing it if you think about it. It can be eaten as an ice cream, served in glasses, but also as a slush-type drink. If you want, you can spike it with the alcohol of your choosing and there you have it, your very own summer cocktail.

For 2 people you will need:
A small bunch of basil (30g), leaves and tender stalks only
200ml water
150g orange blossom honey
3 medium-sized lemons (both zest and juice)

Finely chop the basil leaves or whiz them in a blender with the water.

In a small pot, and over medium heat warm up the water, basil and honey. Bring it to a boil and then turn off the heat and let it steep for 5 minutes. Add your lemon zest and juice. Taste. Have in mind that once frozen, the flavours will become less intense. However, the mixture needs to feel balanced. If you feel it needs more honey, lemon, or even basil add some now.

At this stage, you are faced with a deeply existential choice. To strain or not to strain. If you think about it, it is quite similar to soups. Do you prefer pureed soups like our trahana cream one or the fall pumpkin one? Or do you prefer soups with texture, like our spring one  or the saffron tahinosoupa? The writer’s personal preference is texture. But of course we tried both. And yes, the writer’s own personal preference is still texture.

So strain (or please don’t) the mixture into a clean metal tray. Place your tray in the freezer. Ever half and hour or so remove it from the freezer and using a fork, scrape the semi-frozen liquid around. You can keep tasting and if you feel there is something you’d like to add, you can still do so. Just make sure to stir it all in. After around two hours the granita should be set and you should be ready for the herby bliss.


A summer brunch might just be one of the most amazing ways to spend a hot, lazy Sunday. Even if you’ve had a late night on Saturday, it’s always good to gather with family, friends or flatmates and share food and coffee, slowly waking up together.

One of our favourite recipes for eggs is the one where the sweet tomatoes blend with eggs, creating a symphony of pure harmony. In Greece, this combination of flavours is often called Kagianas and resembles scrambled eggs mixed with tomatoes.

I first came across this dish in a cookery book for kids. A book with recipes from all over the world. I must have been in elementary school, I’m not sure, but this is one of the first cooking memories I have: Patiently waiting for the tomatoes to cook, then adding the eggs, sprinkling feta cheese on top (feta cheese was my addition). Then tasting for the first time the sweetness of tomatoes blending with the comfort of familiar eggs and the salty cheese. My childhood world of food would never be the same. I was mind blown.

This dish, with its many variations has followed me throughout the years. In my home now in London, the cousin of the Greek kagianas (or strapatsada), the well-known middle-eastern shakshouka eggs are most popular. So I encountered it again during our cooking workshop, when our guest chef Despoina prepared it for all of us who participated. The recipe below is inspired by that cooking class and the flavour combinations that Despoina put together.

So next Sunday, gather your family and friends and make with them these delicious eggs. Who knows, maybe you will create new memories.

For 2 people you will need:

3 tbsp of olive oil
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
2 large ripe tomatoes cut in cubes
½ tsp sweet smoked paprika
1tsp oregano
salt
pepper
4 eggs
6 sun dried tomatoes, very finely chopped

 
Over medium heat gently fry the onion until translucent. Add the tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper and add the paprika and half of the sun-dried tomatoes. Cook for 5-10min, until the sauce thickens a bit.

Add the oregano. Taste and adjust for seasoning. Create four holes with the back of your spoon and crack the eggs. Around the eggs, sprinkle the rest of the sun dried tomatoes. Place the lid on the pan for a few minutes. Once the eggs are cooked serve with crusty bread and iced black coffee.


Gemista is a traditional way of cooking and enjoying vegetables in Greece. The word gemista, literally means filled or stuffed. It is a summer food, almost exclusively made during the summer months, as it uses predominantly tomatoes. Tomatoes are at their best in the summer as you may know.

When it comes to most traditional Greek foods, the perception (and often reality) is that they are labour intense. This one, gemista, usually is, as it requires carefully removing the flesh from tomatoes, preparing the stuffing with rice or mince meat, stuffing them and then baking them in the oven. However, in our version here, we are using bulgur wheat instead of rice. And bulgur wheat cooks much faster than rice. And instead of tomatoes, we are using colourful peppers. Removing the flesh is not necessary here, you just have to remove the seeds. So the actual time you’ll spend in the kitchen is really not that much.

The recipe below creates a very pleasant dish. It feels like that friend you want to spend time with on a cool summer evening. It is not heavy on oil, as most gemista usually are and the bulgur wheat gives it an interesting nuttiness. Add to that the sweet smoked paprika and fragrant herbs and you can imagine what we are talking about. So read on and come visit us at Borough Market to source everything you need!

For 6 long stuffed peppers

6 long peppers (red, yellow, green, you choose)
1 medium white onion, finely chopped
3 tbsp olive oil
200g bulgur wheat
2 tbsp sweet smoked paprika
2 generous handfuls of pine nuts
1 small bunch of parsley, finely chopped
1 small bunch of mint, finely chopped
salt
pepper
¼ cup olive oil

Preheat your oven at 200C.

Cut the top part of each pepper. Remove the seeds using your fingers, a small knife or by tapping the pepper on your chopping board.

In a pot warm up the 3 tbsp of oil and gently fry the onion until translucent. Add the paprika and stir until your onions and oil turn red. Add the bulgur wheat and pine nuts. Stir so that everything is well mixed. Add your pine nuts. Add 1 cup of water and stir for a couple of minutes until the bulgur wheat absorbs it all. You are going for one step before al dente here, so that the rest cooks in the oven.

Add the herbs and season with salt and pepper. Taste and add more seasonings or herbs. You need the flavour of your stuffing to be quite intense, as once it is fully cooked, the flavours calm down.

(At this point you could just stop and eat the stuffing, ignoring the rest of the recipe, but trust us, it gets better)

Using a spoon, stuff each pepper with bulgur wheat. Place them on a baking tray with the ¼ cup of olive oil and ½ cup of water. Bake until the peppers are soft and the filling is cooked through, around 30-40min.

Serve with feta cheese or Greek yogurt and warm crusty bread. Welcome to the Greek summer!


The sun is shining. We are now officially in the beginning of summer. Summer is always better if one is by the sea. But most of us are not. So when one lives in a city, summer foods make it all better. Around the market you can now find watermelons. For us, it is the ultimate summer flavour. We spend the entire summer with this pink, sweet fruit. Eaten as is, straight from the fridge is dreamy. Some say it’s even better at room temperature. But you know, it’s summer, one wants something cold to balance the heat.

The last few years, recipes using watermelon are popping up. Think away from smoothies for a bit. Watermelon’s sweetness and crunch balances perfectly with something creamy and salty. You guessed it. Feta cheese and watermelon can become best friends!

And while in Greece usually watermelons are massive-a few kilos each- here, you can get a lovely small watermelon at the market for the salad we are suggesting.

This salad is quite simple. Went for the classic flavour combinations. Watermelon-feta cheese-mint. However, you can use whatever herbs you prefer. How about fresh coriander? Hm! The measurements for watermelon and feta are balanced, but you can obviously add more cheese if you want. Try it and see.

Here, we used our 18oC olive oil. Its grassy, fruity flavour is the perfect pairing for these ingredients.

And whatever you do, don’t forget the vinegar. It really makes all the difference, brightening up the entire dish. Something like the early summer sun, brightening up our lives. You can of course experiment more, add a bit of chilli for spice, lemon or lime for acidity.

For 2 people
400g of watermelon flesh
150g feta cheese
2 tbs olive oil
dashes of red wine vinegar
a few springs of mint
pepper

Remove the peel from the watermelon. Cut the flesh in cubes. We prefer large bite-sized pieces. Place in a bowl. Cut the feta cheese in identical cubes. Fine, they don’t really have to be identical. Add to the watermelon. Pour over olive oil and splashes of the red wine vinegar. Finely chop the mint and sprinkle on top. Add some freshly ground pepper.

This salad makes for a perfect summer lunch. We tried it for breakfast actually. Trust us, it works!


Although often associated with warmer, more exotic lands, the striking looking aubergine is widely cultivated in Britain. Aubergine (Solanum melongena) is botanically not a vegetable but a fruit, closely related to the tomato. Eggplant, or aubergine, is long prized for its beauty as well as its unique taste and texture. Aubergines are a good source of fibre and folic acid. The colour of the skin is a result of the presence of anthocyanins – compounds with antioxidant properties. In addition to featuring a host of vitamins and minerals, eggplant also contains important phytonutrients, many which have antioxidant activity.Rich in antioxidant properties, dietary fibre, copper, magnesium and vitamins B1 and B6 there is no wonder they are considered a nutritional “treasure”. In Greece is it widely used in many recipes including the famous Greek moussaka. Continue reading →


Refreshing and aromatic, strawberries are really hard to resist when fully ripe. They are considered to be Wimbledon’s favorite fruit. During the 2014 Championships alone some 28,000 kg of strawberries were served with fresh cream! The fruit has been growing in Europe since the Roman Times. It was in 1714 however that a French engineer’s trip to Chile and Peru led to the revelation that the Latin American variety of the fruit was much larger. He brought back some seeds and started cultivating them in France. The result was a large, juicy and sweet hybrid, the modern strawberry. It is rich in antioxidant properties, vitamins C and K and an excellent source of fibre, folic acid, manganese and potassium. Try soaking fresh strawberries in sugar and Oliveology’s organic white balsamic vinegar with honey for 30 minutes and serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.


We are so excited that summer solstice is approaching.

It is the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, during which the sun reaches the furthest point from the Equator and seems to be stopping for a while. Intertwined with ancient rituals, pagan traditions and century old customs, Summer Solistice has had a great impact on culture and civilisations. Stonehenge and the Avebury complex in Wiltshire, South West England, were erected around 5,000 years ago as monuments of this unique phenomenon. People still visit them en masse on that day to watch the sun rise in a festive atmosphere bursting with mystery and excitement. Others just enjoy the longest sunshine of the year by the sea or in parks having picnics. Continue reading →