Autumn is officially here and our first recipe for October couldn’t be anything but a comforting soup. If you’ve been following this blog, you must know by now how much we love soups. Remember our luscious celeriac soup? Or our soup with beans and many colourful vegetables? Be it with pulses or just vegetables, soups are our favourite way to get all the nutrients we need. Not to mention, the anticipation of a hot bowl of soup for dinner make us feel wonderful.

This week however we are not using pulses or vegetables for our soup. Instead, we are using trahana, a fascinating ingredient made with wheat and fermented milk. There are two varieties, sour and sweet, and you can opt for either. We selected the sour trahana, as we are serving this soup with dried spiced peppers also known in Greece as boukovo. Boukovo is a blend of various spiced peppers which is widely used in Greek cooking. Because of the variety of the peppers used, it that adds a unique warmth and depth to your dishes. Of course, you can use any other dried chili of your choice. We’ll be serving this soup at our Greek Rural Feast Dinner, this December! Book now, spaces are filling up fast.

Serves 6 as a starter

1 small onion
2 tbsp olive oil
A few pinches of boukovo or dried chilli (to taste)
160g sour trahana
1.5lt vegetable stock
Salt (to taste)
Chili oil (to serve)

Very finely chop your onion.

In a medium-sized pot add the olive oil and onion and cook over medium heat until translucent. Add the boukovo and cook for another minute. Add the trahana and stir well, until the grains are coated in the olive oil.

Add the vegetable stock, season with salt and stir. Bring your soup to a boil, then lower the heat to its lowest setting and cook, covered, for an hour, or until trahana is very, very tender, stirring every few minutes.

Serve immediately with chili oil. If you have leftovers, you can reheat your soup adding some water or vegetable stock, as tranaha tends to absorb all liquid as it cools down.


A few years ago, in the beginning of my time in London, I went through what many now Londoners might have experienced: A rough day where I was overworked, exhausted, and a bit hopeless in this big city that I then struggled to call home. If any of you have experienced such a day, then you will relate more with this week’s recipe.

What does one do on such a day? I will share with you what I did. I took a day off work, walked to the nearby market and, feeling slightly guilty and slightly excited I walked around. I had already had breakfast, but decided that breakfast food was what I needed. I bought all the ingredients I needed and in less than an hour, my tiny flat was filled with comforting smells, and I was sitting on the couch having my second breakfast, a wholesome bowl of a very unique ‘porridge’.

So today, we have a very comforting breakfast recipe for you. One that I go to whenever I find myself overworked, or in gloomy autumn mornings. This recipe takes only a bit of time. And love. And it gives back love.

We are using sour trahana, a very unique Greek ingredient.  It is made with fermented milk and wheat. With its slightly tangy flavour and comforting smell, it makes a very unique ‘Greek porridge’. Here, we’ve got inspiration from our olive oil porridge and added some graviera cheese, olive oil and of course a drizzle of honey. Trust us, it works! Top it up with some seasonal fresh fruit and nuts! This recipe is for one, but it scales easily.

Serves 1

75 gr trahana (sour)
250g milk (plus more if needed)
25 g graviera cheese
1 tsp olive oil
1 tsp honey (plus more, for serving)
fresh or dried fruit, and nuts (for serving)

In a small pot add the trahana and your milk. Over medium heat bring it to a simmer, then lower the heat to its lowest setting. Let it cook, stirring often (otherwise it will stick to the bottom of the pot), for 15- 20 minutes, until trahana is soft and you have a porridge-like texture. You may need to add a bit more milk to loosen it up.

Grate the graviera cheese and add it to the pot, along with the olive oil and honey. Stir everything together until the cheese melts, for a minute or so.

Serve with fresh or dried fruit, nuts and more honey if desired.


Trahanas is a very unique Greek ingredient and an ideal way to take a culinary journey to Greece. It is a combination of fermented milk and wheat. You can use it to make a comforting thick soup, add it to your stews for some texture or have it instead of porridge in the morning.

We love its slightly tangy flavour and comforting smell. In autumn, we always make cook with trahanas. So this week we’ve decided to combine it with our favourite autumn vegetable: mushrooms! And of course, what is the perfect pairing when it comes to these flavours? Truffles. Yes, this week we are making a luscious trahanas soup, with mushrooms and truffles!

For this, we are using our black truffle flakes  a very unique ingredient. These aromatic flakes of dehydrated black summer truffle (Tuber aestivum) only need to be rehydrate in lukewarm water and add an exquisite depth to your dishes. And to make it even more lush, we’re serving this dish with truffle oil!

Serves 2 as main, 4 as a starter

250g large button mushrooms
1 tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion
1/2 leek
3 tbsp olive oil
100g sour trahanas
4 cups vegetable stock
1/3 pack truffle flakes plus one cup of water
truffle oil (to serve)

Cut the mushrooms in half or in quarters. In a frying pan add 1 tbsp of olive oil, just to coat the bottom of the pan. Place your mushrooms, all in one layer and cook over high heat, turning occasionally, until the mushrooms are golden brown on the outside.

As the mushrooms are cooking, finely chop the leek and onion. Add the rest of the olive oil in a pot and over medium-low heat gently fry the onion and leek, until translucent. Add the trahanas and stir to coat with the olive oil. Add the mushrooms and your stock. Bring to the boil, and then lower the heat and let your soup simmer, covered, for 45 minutes, until trahanas is tender.
A few minutes before serving uncover the pot and rehydrate the truffles in one cup of lukewarm water. When the soup is ready, add the truffles and flavoured water. Stir well and serve immediately, drizzling some truffle oil on top.


“Trahana” is made with either semolina, wheat flour, bulgur or cracked wheat that has been soaked in milk and then dried in the sun; it is one of the oldest East Mediterrenean foods that varies a lot in different regions in Greece. There are two types: sweet trahana and sour trahana. Traditionally, sour trahana is made with fermented raw goat and/or sheep and/or cow milk or yoghurt. Sweet trahana is made with milk (usually sheeps’ or goats’ milk). The two are very popular in Greece and Cyprus.
I am a big fan of sour trahana, especially for its nutty and sour flavour. My usual way of having the soup is with caramelised onions, garlic, tomato, oregano and –of course- feta. This time, I decided to modify an old Christoforos Peskias recipe as I find the addition of yoghurt –and figs, of course, an
excellent idea. The recipe adds to the soup, a wonderful creaminess as well as a sweet and crunchy layer which I loved! Did someone say comfort food?
Cream soup of trahana garnished with sun-dried figs

Serves 6-8

Ingredient
1 kilo of sour trahana
2L of chicken broth
1 whole onion, peeled
2 whole garlic cloves, peeled
1 big carrot, (preferably organic) peeled
1 bay leaf
1 tbs of dried thyme
300g of sheep’s yoghurt, 300g strained yoghurt
300g sun-dried figs
4 tbs of evoo
Sea salt, freshly ground pepper

Method
In a soup pot heat 4 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat and add trahana. Stir until coated with oil, about 1 minute. Add chicken broth (or water) onion, garlic, carrot and bring to a boil. Add bay leaf, thyme, reduce the heat and simmer for 40 mins, stirring often, until trahana is tender and nutty tasting and the broth slightly thickened. Remove carrot, onion, garlic and bay leaf from the mix.

The mixture should be more like porridge. Remove from heat and add the soup to a food processor (or blender) and pulse it for about 20 minutes. Pass the soup through a strainer for a smoother texture. Add the mix to a big bowl and stir in both types of yoghurt to the mix, top with salt and pepper to taste.
Spoon into bowls and garnish them with chopped sun-dried figs. Enjoy!