It was Valentine’s day yesterday and we hope you had a wonderful time with your loved ones! Did you make our Valentine’s Orzo with Black Truffle Sauce? If not, go ahead, it’s simple, delicious and between us, it doesn’t have to be Valentine’s day to enjoy something like this!

This week we have a new recipe using one of our products of the month: saffron! Remember our Saffron and Orange Chickpeas from a few weeks ago? If you haven’t used this unique ingredient before, this week’s recipe is ideal.

And I must say, do have a look at our beautiful hamper for the adventurous cook. It includes saffron amongst other intriguing ingredients that guarantee to inspire your daily cooking! Or check our gift bag with saffron and other treats!

This recipe is adapted from the Greek magazine Gastronomos, one of our favourite ones. It is on the sour side, so if you prefer your dressings sweeter don’t hesitate to add a bit of honey or grape molasses. Cooking after all is all about adapting recipes to your own unique preferences!

Serves 2

400g carrots
1 tbsp lemon
1 tbsp orange juice
1 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 generous pinches of saffron in 1 tbsp of warm water
1 clove of garlic minced
5 tbsp olive oil
Salt

Wash, peel and cut your carrots in bite-sized pieces. Place them in a large pot with boiling, salted water and boil until tender. Remove from the pot and drain. You can skip this step if you prefer and use the carrots raw.

In the meantime, make your dressing.
In a bowl whisk together the lemon juice, orange juice, red wine vinegar, saffron in water and garlic. Slowly add the olive oil, until the mixture is emulsified. Taste and season with salt and pepper.

Toss warm (or raw!) carrots and dressing together and serve immediately.


This week we’re all into cooking. And we are getting ready for our cooking workshops this autumn! The first one is just for kids, at the end of October with the wonderful Amaryllis who makes cooking a fascinating experience for the little ones. And then there is our November one, for adults, with Lia who brings together her Welsh life and Greek heritage. We’ve also started planning our December one, full of Christmas recipes with a special guest chef-details soon to follow.

So yes, we do love cooking this week. And we’ve prepared a vibrant dressing for you. Dressings are our favourite things. They can turn any ingredient or dish into something you look forward to savouring. This one is made with yogurt! You see, we wanted to get a bit away from the vinaigrettes and create something creamy and comforting. Its secret ingredient is our smoked paprika! You can use this dressing in green salads, pour over roasted vegetables or make a delicious potato salad.

This quantity is enough for 6 side salads. You will need:

150g yogurt
1 tbsp mustard
5 tbsp olive oil
zest of 1 lemon
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tsp smoked paprika
3 tbsp water

In a bowl mix the yogurt and mustard. Add the lemon zest, juice and smoked paprika and mix well. Add the olive oil and stir, adding the water one tablespoon at a time so that you have the texture you want. If you want the dressing to be more runny then add a bit more water, one tablespoon at a time.


On Halloween we like to dress up, change ourselves. On All Hallows’ Eve, we become different people. Even just for one night. It’s fun and often, cathartic. But what about food? We all have recipes that we trust. Familiar flavours. And very often we stick to them religiously. For us, Halloween is the time of the year when we experiment. We take comfort foods of our past and turn them into something new. With the easiest way possible. Change one ingredient. Think about it. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel, just think outside the box. Get inspired by the ingredients themselves.

Our inspiration for this year is our limited edition apple oil. Its complex flavour will change completely a comforting squash soup. Olives, apples, walnuts, cinnamon, honey, lemon and sage are all crushed together to create it. It is not your ordinary infused oil.

Follow our recipe for the warm squash soup:

For a large pot of soup (feeds 5 or 7 really hungry people)

1.5kg pumpkin (or squash)
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 small white onion
1 small red onion
1 piece of ginger, the size of your two thumbs together
1 red chilli
1-2 tsp of mixed spices (we used coriander, cumin, turmeric, caraway)
Salt to taste
1-1.5l vegetable stock

Cut the squash in wedges or in half and roast it in the oven, at 200C, drizzled with olive oil and a bit of salt, until the flesh is tender, around 40 minutes. Scoop out all the flesh (You can skip this last step if you want).

Peel and roughly chop the onions, ginger, chilli. In a large pot pour some olive oil and gently fry them. Add the spices and stir. Add the squash and stir again so that everything comes together. Pour 1lt of stock and bring to a boil. Then lower the heat and let the soup simmer, so that the aromas blend and the squash is completely soft, around 30-45 minutes. Transfer the soup to a blender, and blend until smooth. Return to pot and if needed add more stock, salt, spices.

And now for the metamorphosis.
Serve the soup with Greek yogurt and drizzle our limited edition apple oil. The soup is spicy and sweet, warm and comforting. The yogurt adds the much needed tanginess and freshness. And the apple oil, oh with its sweet aromas of the semi-ripe Koroneiki olives, apples, honey and cinnamon and the nuttiness from the walnuts and sage. You’re in for a treat!


Are you familiar with the song: “Sugar is sweet/ But not as sweet as my baby/ Honey’s a treat but it/ Can’t compete with my baby”? It seems like they have never tried grape molasses! In Greece when we want to say that something/ someone is really sweet, we say they are sweet like petimezi. One great thing about our health awareness and sugar rush/ tax era is rediscovering excellent ingredients like this one. Grape molasses or petimezi, is an ancient food, popular for its nutritious qualities and delightful flavour. Before establishing the use of sugar, petimezi was very commonly used across the Mediterranean and especially Greece, not only as a sweetener but as a remedy as well.

Petimezi’s flavour is sweet with a hint of spice and its aroma is pungent, potent and so incredibly tempting. This excellent product comes from boiling grape-must in low heat for a long time. It is rather expensive since the production process is long and the yield is small. Its texture is quite similar to aged balsamic vinegar; if you are an Ottolenghi fan, then you are definitely familiar with pomegranate molasses and can use petimezi, accordingly.

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We are delighted to announce another award! This time by the prestigious International Taste & Quality Institute (iTQi) The International Taste & Quality Institute – iTQi – based in Brussels, is the world leading organisation dedicated to testing and promoting superior food and drink. The Superior Taste Award is a unique international recognition based upon the blind judgment of Chefs and Sommeliers who are opinion leaders and experts in taste.


Oliveology 21°C is made with semi ripe Koroneiki olives, hand picked and pressed within hours. These olives are pressed with walnuts, purslane, fennel seeds, bay leaves, oregano and rosemary exclusively grown on our organic farm in Sparta.

Walnuts and purslane are an exceptional source of Omega-3 fatty acids. In the case of walnuts this is common knowledge, but what about purslane? Purslane is a leafy vegetable plant that most people consider a weed. In Greece it grows wild in abundance and is widely used in salads or cooked as a vegetable. It is extraordinary that purslane contains more Omega-3 fatty acids than any other leafy vegetable plant.

The power of walnuts and purslane is what makes Oliveology 21°C an exceptionally good source of Omega-3 (with an excellent Omega-6 to Omega 3 ratio at 5.9!).  It has a fresh taste that is full of flavour, which makes it really appealing to all ages. (much tastier than yucky fish oil capsules!) This is a limited edition oil and is only available in 350 ml.

Excellent on salads or on roasted, grilled or steamed vegetables!

Visit our Glossary page to find out more about purslane and fatty acids.