This week we are feeling quite autumn-y. And what goes better with autumn, than wonderful baking activities on a Sunday afternoon!

So this week we are making a recipe that is something between a bread and a cake. What do we mean? It is a dough made with flour, nuts and dried fruit! It is very moist and not at all sweet. You can have it with tea, butter and honey for a filling breakfast, serve it as part of your cheese platter alongside crackers, or even enjoy as is.

For this recipe we used dried apricots and cherries. As our dried fruit have no added sugar, the result is dense and flavourful. But do not expect it to be sweet. It is more on the bitter/sour side. So if you wish, you can add a bit of honey or sugar in the recipe, or omit the balsamic vinegar. But first, try this one, it really is something special, especially served with plenty of honey.

Another idea would be to get our Autumn Baking bundle and use all of its ingredients for this recipe!

This recipe is adapted from a recipe created by Nena Ismirnoglou, whose recipes always surprise us with their simplicity and flavour.

Makes a medium-sized cake tin

200g all-purpose flour
8g dried yeast
300g dried fruit (we used a combination of apricots and cherries)
50ml balsamic cream with mandarin
120ml water
100g nuts (we used raw almonds and raw hazelnuts
2 tbsp oak honey, plus more to serve
½ tsp ground cloves, cinnamon or other warm spices

Finely chop the dried fruit. Warm up the balsamic cream with the water and pour over the fruit. Let them soak for 30minutes.

Ground the almonds and hazelnuts. Mix together your flour, ground nuts and spices.

In a large bowl whisk together the yeast with 2tbsp of warm water. Add to the bowl the flour-nuts mixture and dried fruit. Knead well until you have a slightly sticky dough. Cover with a tea-towel and let your dough rest in a warm environment for 30minutes.

Preheat your oven at 180C.

Place some greaseproof paper on a cake tin and drizzle it with 1 tablespoon of honey. Place your dough in the tin and push it gently. Drizzle the rest of the honey on top of the dough.

Bake for 30min. Remove from the oven and serve warm or at room temperature.


As we all are now well into autumn, gloomy mornings are this week’s inspiration for our recipe. Let me explain. I love autumn- and autumn weather for that matter. But I am not really a morning person. As a child, I remember wonderful breakfasts served at our family table to be the thing that made me excited about leaving the comfort of my bed. As an adult, I really don’t know how my parents managed to create such delicious things in the mornings.

Maybe they planned ahead. Like we are doing this week! So we need something exciting to make us craw out of bed and give us energy to get on with our busy days. And since this summer we didn’t make a granola, as we did last summer and the summer before that, we decided it’s time.

So here you go, this week’s recipe is our autumn granola. For this one we used our favourite raw hazelnuts, pure cocoa powder, and oak honey. This is a honey that is not too sweet and perfectly complements the nuttiness of the hazelnuts and the sweetness of the chocolate. Because yes, we decided to indulge a bit, and used a tiny bit of dark chocolate. You can of course omit it if you want, the recipe works great without it. And as always, we made our granola with olive oil!

Makes one large jar:
200g oats
100g raw hazelnuts
2 tbsp raw cocoa
3 tbsp oak honey
2 tbsp olive oil
50g dark chocolate (optional)
pinch of salt

Preheat the oven at 150C.

Roughly chop the hazelnuts and the chocolate (if using).

In a large bowl mix together the hazelnuts, chocolate pieces, oats, cocoa and salt.

Lay some greaseproof paper in a baking tray and place your oat mixture.

In a separate bowl whisk together the honey and olive oil.

Drizzle the olive oil/honey on top of the oats mixture and using your hands, mix everything together until well-mixed.

Bake in the oven, stirring every 10 min and for about 30min or until the granola is golden-brown. Let it cool and store in an airtight jar.

Oh, and did we tell you? This is perfect simply served with milk!

 


This week we’ve got a somewhat unusual recipe for you. August and September in Greece are usually months of preserving in our household. We make tomato passata to last all winter, and jams using very ripe fruit, like figs or peaches, as their season is coming to an end.

However, it is not a preserving recipe we’ve got for you this week. It is one that you can make using any overripe fruit you may have. It works great with apricots, but you can also use peaches, plums and yes, figs!

Here, we have combined apricots with dried apricots (how surprising, I know!) and almonds, but you can mix and match, depending on what dried fruit or nuts you love most. We baked these in the oven with olive oil, our balsamic cream with mandarin, and a bit of honey. The result is soft fruit, bold flavours and the perfect pairing to a grilled manouri or halloumi cheese. This recipe is also perfect to accompany a cheese & cured meats platter, or your morning yogurt. It really is the best way to make use of the wonderful last fruit of summer and welcome autumn.

We are serving this with one of our favourite summer ingredients: rosemary floral water!

We spent most of the summer spraying this aromatic water on our body and hair after the beach, but who says we can’t ‘perfume’ our dishes too? Floral waters are absolutely perfect to use in the kitchen too! So as you are serving this dish, spray on each plate -and on each guest if you dare! Trust us, you are in for a treat.

Serves two

150g apricots
2 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp balsamic cream with mandarin
30g dried apricots
30g almonds
1 tbsp vanilla fir honey
pinch of salt
rosemary water (to serve)

Cut the apricots in half, removing all stones. Cut the dried apricots in small pieces and roughly chop the almonds. Place everything in an oven dish. Whisk together the olive oil, balsamic mandarin glaze, honey and salt. Mix with your fruit and nuts, so that everything is coated with the liquid.

Cover with tinfoil and bake at 200C for 30 min or until the fruit is soft and the flavours have blended.

To serve, place on individual plates and spray rosemary water over each plate.


Halloumi is in store! A few weeks ago, we received our amazing halloumi from Cyprus, made purely from goats’ milk. For some reason, I have associated halloumi with summer. I am not sure why, it is equally tasty during winter: grated into pies, placed on top of winter vegetables and roasted in the oven, or as part of our winter salads. But this season somehow makes me crave it even more.

When thinking what to pair it with, my mind went back to summers past. A few summers ago, I worked for a brilliant Greek chef called Chrysanthos Karamolegos. He is a larger-than-life man, full of creativity and love for Greek cuisine. A cosmopolitan creature, he always takes unusual ingredients and puts them together, resulting in the most amazing flavour combinations. The recipe we have today for you is from my memories of his flavours, of my time with him, memories of life-changing culinary experiences that made life sparkle, bite after bite.

So if during summer, like me, you sometimes lose yourself in the slower pace of life, in the heat, or in the holidays away from home, this recipe is to remind us that there is always a bite of food that can let the light in.

Serves two as main
250g halloumi cheese
500g very cold cold melon
3 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp honey
3 tsp white vinegar
1 red chilli
a few fresh basil leaves

Cut the melon into bite-sized pieces. In a bowl, mix together the remaining olive oil, honey and vinegar. Finely chop the chilli and basil leaves. Add to your dressing. Toss together the melon and dressing and place on a plate. Slice the halloumi into thick slices and grill in a frying pan or griddle, using 1 tsbp of olive oil. Place the grilled halloumi on top of your melon and serve immediately. Enjoy!

 

 


Spring is the time of the year with unpredictable weather. As we are all waiting for the warm sunny days, we often wake up to gloomy mornings. Like today for example.

During those cold mornings there is only one thing that brings us comfort: Porridge! You remember our delicious banana and cinnamon olive oil porridge, right?

This time we’ve decided to make it a bit differently. We will bake it in the oven with olive oil, and sweeten it with our Corinth raisins, grape molasses and wild flower honey.

With this recipe we are saying goodbye to the last apples of the season and welcome spring, with its lovely fruit and warm, long days! And of course, we will add some walnuts, our product of the month! Walnuts and apples are best friends after all.

And for those of you who are kinda crazy for porridge like me, this dish makes for a wonderful dessert, with some Greek yogurt or, dare I say, ice cream on top.

So let’s create our perfect morning breakfast and get ready for more spring breakfasts ahead!

Serves 4

1 cup oats
2 apples
1 tsp cinnamon
1 pinch of salt
50g walnuts
30g Corinth raisins
2 tbsp grape molasses
2 tbsp wild flower honey
6 tbsp olive oil
1 cup milk
1 cup water

Preheat the oven to 200C.

Cut the apples in thin slices.

In a large bowl, whisk together the grape molasses, honey, olive oil, milk and water until well combined. Add the cinnamon and salt.

Add the apples, oats, raisins and walnuts in your bowl and stir with a wooden spoon.

Place the porridge mixture in a baking tray and cover with foil. Bake for 30 minutes covered. Remove the foil and bake for an additional 15 minutes, or until the porridge is cooked and golden.


This week is one of our favourites of the year! Why, you ask. This week we are receiving our new olive oil! We are very excited and soon you will get the chance to stock up on your favourite ones.

We usually use our 22 olive oil in our recipes. This mid harvest olive oil is made from semi ripe olives. It has a mellow quality and a silky smooth texture that adds depth and flavour to all of our culinary preparations.

But for this week’s recipe, we’ve prepared a dressing using our lemongrass and tarragon olive oil.

This awarded olive oil is made from semi ripe olives crushed with fresh lemongrass and tarragon. We’ve used it in the past in this wonderful summer salad. As we received the new batch, an idea came to mind. This olive oil pairs perfectly with our sweet balsamic chilli vinegar. Our organic vinegar from the Agioritiko red grape variety has a gentle kick from chilli peppers that is the ultimate pair for the very fresh flavour and intense aromas of our lemongrass and tarragon oil.

You can use this dressing in your salads, fish, prawns or green vegetables. We had frozen some Brussels sprouts a few months back and, on a this cold spring week, we’ve decided to combine a winter vegetable with a vibrant dressing. Hint: it’s great with asparagus that are now in season!

Serves 2 side salads

1 fat clove of garlic
1tbsp sweet balsamic chilli vinegar
1 pinch of dried chillies
1tsp wild flower honey
3 tbsp lemongrass and tarragon olive oil
salt and pepper (to taste)

Mince the garlic using salt. In a bowl, whisk the garlic, vinegar, chillies, honey until well mixed. Slowly add the olive oil, whisking constantly until emulsified.

Toss the dressing in warm vegetables, or poor over your favourite dish.

Happy new olive oil season everyone!


This week we’ve got another exciting recipe with chickpeas for you. Chickpeas are one of our go-to pulses for all seasons. They work perfectly used in a spiced winter stew, or turned into a fresh summer salad. So this week, as we are well into Lent, we have prepared this vegetarian dish that is perfect for those of us fasting.

This recipe is quite interesting, as we’ve decided to use honey and raisins to add sweetness to the chickpeas. We spiced it up with curry spices and served it with plenty of Greek yogurt to balance it (of course, you can omit this if you are fasting). And turns out, this dish makes for a wonderful, hearty breakfast, I kid you not. And did we say that it is super easy to make?

Serves two with leftovers

200g chickpeas
4 medium carrots
6 tbsp olive oil
2/3 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp curry spices
30g Corinth raisins
1 cup of water
2 tsp wild flower honey
yogurt and fresh herbs (to serve)

The night before soak your chickpeas in plenty of water. The morning after cook them until tender.

Preheat your oven at 200C.

Cut your carrots into small bite-sized pieces. In a baking tray add the chickpeas, carrots, olive oil, spices, raisins, water and honey. Mix very well. Bake, covered at 200C for 20 minutes and uncovered for another 20 minutes, until all ingredients have happily come together and you have a thick stew.

Serve hot or at room temperature, with plenty of yogurt and fresh herbs.


A few months back, we saw that our lovely Amarylis had made chickpeas with orange, using our olives and capers. What a wonderful combination of flavours, I thought at the time! So when thinking of this week’s recipe, and with all the citrus fruit around, this idea came to mind. Chickpeas and orange! And as winter makes us all feel really cold, we thought of adding something different to our chickpeas. Saffron!

Our organic Greek Saffron comes from the Kozani Cooperative in Northern Greece. It has a unique floral flavour and aroma, while it gives an exquisite amber colour to many dishes, desserts and beverages. Including our chickpeas! Oh and did we mention it has antioxidant properties amongst other things?

Here’s the recipe and check out our hamper for the Adventurous Cook, that includes saffron!

Serves two for lunch

1 small leek
1 medium onion
4tbsp olive oil

100 g chickpeas
1 very large orange, zest and juice
2 pinches of saffron in 1 cup of warm water
½ tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp orange blossom honey
salt

to serve:
Boiled rice or Greek yogurt
Fresh coriander or parsley
Honey

 

The night before, soak your chickpeas. The morning after, boil the chickpeas in plenty of water, until soft.

Preheat the oven at 180C.

Finely slice the leek and chop the onion. In an oven proof casserole, heat fry your leek and onion in the olive oil until transluscent and slightly caramelised. Remove from the heat and add the chickpeas, orange juice and zest, saffron, smoked paprika, salt and honey. Stir well and place in the oven. Bake for an hour to an hour and a half, until the flavours have blended, adding a bit more water if needed.

Serve with rice or Greek yogurt, fresh herbs and more honey if you desire.


This week we are trying out something a little bit different. January days can sometimes feel a bit dull, but not for us here at Oliveology. On the contrary, they often inspire us to think outside the box, add more colours and flavours to our weekly cooking routine. Cooking after all should be more about creativity and less about routine, right?

So what are we making? To begin with, we selected two of our favourite winter vegetables, beetroot and sweet potato. Remember our beetroot dip or our lentil and sweet potato vegan soup? This dish is vegetarian too, you guessed it right.

But these are no ordinary roasted vegetables. Inspired by the Greek cooking magazine Gastronomos, we are making them sweet and a little bit sour. We will use honey to bring out the vegetables’ natural sweetness, and balsamic vinegar to add a very welcome acidic note. And the ingredients that bring everything together: oranges and grapefruits!

Oh, and did we mention that apart from spending a bit of time preparing your vegetables, this recipe needs nothing more? That’s what we call an easy January dinner!

For 4 people (plus leftovers):

700g sweet potatoes
700g beetroot
1 large red onion
1 large grapefruit, zest and juice
1 large orange, zest and juice

100g wild flower honey
50ml aged balsamic vinegar
100ml olive oil
salt

Preheat the oven at 180C.

Peel the sweet potato and scrub the beetroot. Cut in small bite sized pieces (vegetables will cook faster this way). Peel and finely slice the onion.

Place your vegetables in a large baking tray. Add the citrus juices and zest.

In a small saucepan add the honey and warm it up to make it more runny. Remove from the hear and add the vinegar and olive oil. Pour over the vegetables.

Season well with salt and toss everything together so that the vegetables are coated with the honey-vinegar mixture and citrus juices.

Bake for an hour or until the vegetables are soft, sticky and slightly caramelised.


This week we’ve got something different for you. With December in full swing, the weather is now properly cold. During those cold winter days, we always think of citrus fruit. Somehow all their vitamins make us feel stronger.

So when thinking of this week’s recipe, we couldn’t but use citrus. And what a better way to incorporate all these healthy juices into your daily food routine, than with a delicious citrus dressing! But healthy doesn’t mean not festive. You can use this dressing for your seasonal greens, roasted squash and even in a simple bulgur wheat salad! Can you think of anything better for your Christmas table?

In this recipe, we have balanced the acidity and bitterness of the citrus with a bit of honey and used our favourite red wine vinegar to pump up the flavours. After all, winter requires intense flavours, right?

Makes enough for a side salad of 4

1 lime, zest and juice separately
2 grapefruit, zest and juice separately
1 orange, zest and juice separately
1 clove of garlic, minced
1 tsp orange blossom honey
1 tbsp red wine vinegar
5 tbsp olive oil
Salt and pepper (to taste)

Combine all citrus juice together. Measure 5 tbsp of juice and set aside. Drink the rest, it’s good for you. In a bowl whisk together the zest, juice, the garlic, honey and vinegar. Slowly add the olive oil and whisk until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Taste and if you feel it needs more sweetness, add a bit more honey.