This week again, we’ve got a very summery recipe from Amaryllis from The Tasty Other. Amaryllis is one of our favourite guest chefs in our dinner experiences cooking workshops. She has a pure love for food, a fascination with tradition and gatherings, and great passion about storytelling through photography. You can check out many of her recipes here, and of course follow her on instagram. So here it is, words and recipe by Amaryllis, right below. Enjoy!

Grapes and figs are easily my favourite summer fruits and I have my family’s summer house to thank for this; the vines surrounding almost the entire house and our very large fig tree (which, coincidentally, is exactly the same age as me!) always offer their fruit in abundance and we enjoy them both fresh off the vine and tree, but also combined with other delicious seasonal ingredients. This salad features red & green sweet grapes, brown lentils (another family favourite and irresistible when added to cold dishes), a hefty dose of my beloved tarragon and big chunks of Cretan graviera. The latter really brings the dish together with its mild sweetness and irresistible subtle fragrance, perfectly balancing out the acidity of the aged balsamic.

Ingredients
300g red & yellow grapes, washed
1 tablespoon honey (choose a non-floral variety, such as pine or wild thyme)
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons aged balsamic vinegar
About 10g fresh tarragon, leaves picked & thinly chopped
400g cooked lentils
3 gem lettuces, washed and very roughly chopped
60-80g Cretan graviera cheese, in chunks

To serve:
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons roasted hazelnuts (roughly chopped)
freshly ground black pepper (to taste)

Method
Preheat the oven to 200C (180C fan); put the grapes, honey, olive oil & balsamic into a deep roasting dish, along with a big pinch of salt, and roast for about 15’, or until the grapes start to burst. Remove and set aside to cool at room temperature.

Toss the lentils with a pinch of salt and then add the grapes (no need to remove from the sprigs, just cut them in small bunches) and their juice, chopped tarragon, lettuce and cheese chunks. Toss well and serve with additional extra virgin olive oil, chopped hazelnuts and a little black pepper.


Summer is in full swing and this week we’ve decided to turn off our hob. There’s nothing better than enjoying a lazy morning, sitting on the balcony or living room, sipping something refreshing and enjoying the summer quiet.

To inspire you, this week we’ve decided to make a simple, yet delicious smoothie for you. We absolutely love fresh fruit in our breakfasts, remember our summer fruit granola or our pear, galomyzithra cheese and bee pollen toast? So in this smoothie we’ve used peaches and bananas. But you can also add nectarines, apricots, cherries, whatever you can find at the market these days!

We’ve used Greek yoghurt (of course!), a tiny bit of honey to sweeten our smoothie and our secret ingredient: cinnamon! We are very excited, as you can now find Greek yoghurt on our website, along with other cheese and dairy products! Feta cheese
or halloumi anyone?

 

Serves 2

2 small peaches
1 banana
200g Greek yoghurt
1 tbsp honey
½ tsp cinnamon

Remove the stones from the peaches and peel the banana. In a blender whizz together the fruit, yoghurt, honey and cinnamon.

Serve over ice cubes, with more cinnamon. Or you can or mix it with oats for a full-on summer breakfast! Oh and did we say that this is actually perfect in the afternoon too?

 


This week we’re using the first strawberries of the season to make a unique recipe. You must know by now how much we enjoy poaching fruit in grape molasses. Remember our spiced pears from a few years ago? And the spiced rhubarb recipe we made last year? So this year we couldn’t but use one of our favourite fruits: strawberries!

We love using grape molasses, it’s such a unique ingredient. We often use it instead of sugar. It adds depth and a complex sweetness to both sweet or savoury dishes. It is also perfect for dressings, drizzled over porridge and added to your morning coffee. Read more about it here and find more recipes here! And definitely have a go at this delicious grape molasses cake! 

For this recipe, we decided to take it one step further and added a bit of honey in the end, for a slightly sweeter result. Do not expect the sweetness jam has. But do expect mellow strawberries and a warm, complex flavourful liquid. So without further ado, grab some strawberries from the market and join us in our Oliveology kitchen!

Makes 2 jars

600g strawberries
½ cup (150ml) grape molasses
½ cup water
3 tbsp honey

 

Hull the strawberries and cut the large ones in half. Place in a medium-sized saucepan with the grape molasses and your water.

Bring to the boil and then lower the heat and simmer for around 40min, until the liquid is reduced –but is still plenty, and the strawberries are soft and tender.

Remove from the heat and immediately add the honey, stirring well until all is combined.

Place in jars and keep in the fridge. Serve with Greek yoghurt.


As we were preparing this recipe, we debated a lot on whether bee pollen reminds us more of winter or spring. You see, bee pollen is known as nature’s living superfood, as it is a source of essential vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, amino acids and enzymes including iron, protein, Vitamin B1, B2 and B3. So it’s our go-to ingredient during winter, when we feel we need an immunity booster. At the same time, it really reminds us of spring, of flowers blossoming and bees buzzing, as it is collected by honeybees from the forests and flora of Northern Greece.

So we decided to settle the debate, by making a spring granola with bee pollen. Eating this granola for breakfast also feels great for our body during these challenging times. And what goes best with bee pollen? Honey, of course and crunchy, beautiful almonds.

Makes 1 jar

200g oats
100g almonds
pinch of salt
4 tbsp olive oil
4 tbsp orange blossom honey
1 tbsp sesame seeds
3 tbsp bee pollen

Preheat the oven at 150C.
Roughly chop the almonds.

In a large bowl, place the oats and almonds. In a separate bowl, whisk together the olive oil, honey and salt. Pour the liquid mixture over the oats and nuts, and gently toss everything together, until the oats and nuts are all covered with honey and olive oil.

Place the granola on a baking sheet, nicely spread out and bake in the oven for around 20’, tossing regularly. Be careful not to burn it!

Once the granola is golden remove from the oven and let cool. Toss in the sesame and bee pollen. Store in an airtight jar.


All of us at Oliveology love cooking with as little waste as possible. We love putting leftover veggies in hearty soups, to make tarts with whatever jarred ingredients we have in our fridge, and we even make bread with olives and sun-dried tomatoes we don’t feel like eating anymore.

When it comes to overripe fruit, we always go for jams. But I have been for years wondering about banana bread. You see, it’s not a cake, and it’s not a bread either. How does one eat it, really? So last week, when we had some overripe bananas, I knew it was time to see for myself. And when we say overripe, we mean black outside. Don’t bin them, make this recipe!

And of course, as you may know, we love adding olive oil and honey in almost everything. So banana bread could be no exception. This recipe also has Greek yoghurt, and wholemeal barley flour. And we also used a heart-shaped cake tin, no particular reason there.

What to expect: A dark brown colour, very airy, bouncy texture and a wholesome taste that is not at all sweet. So indeed, the name bread is really accurate.

Makes one large loaf (or a heart-shaped tin)

400g very ripe bananas
5tbsp vanilla fir honey
5tbsp olive oil
100g yoghurt (you can find it at our shops at Borough Market and Spa Terminus)
3 eggs
200g wholemeal barley flour
1tbsp baking soda
1tbsp baking powder
30g walnuts, finely chopped

Preheat the oven at 180C.

In a large bowl whisk the bananas until smooth. If you are left with a few banana lumps, that’s ok.

Add the honey, olive oil and yoghurt and whisk again. Add the eggs, one at a time, and whisk until you have a smooth mixture with a few banana lumps.

In a separate bowl, sieve the flour, baking powder and baking soda. Add the mixture to the banana bowl and mix well. You should have something that looks like a slightly denser cake batter.

Grease your cake or bread tin with olive oil and dust with flour. Pour the batter in it and sprinkle the walnuts on top.

Bake at 180C for 30-45 minutes. The banana bread is ready when you insert a knife into the centre and it comes out clean.

Serve with Greek yoghurt and plenty of honey!


Christmas is now slowly coming to an end, but somehow we are still feeling festive. The New Year is after all very close!

This week we have selected a wonderful recipe that will certainly fill you with warmth. A honey & spices granola! It is filled with fragrant spices, such as cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg and sweetened with vanilla fir honey. And because we’re feeling very festive, we’ve used our apple oil to give our granola a wonderful subtle aroma. This granola makes for a perfect gift for the New Year. Just put it in a lovely jar with a colourful ribbon.

But it’s also the ideal way to use up any leftover nuts and dried fruit you may have from Christmas. And as the year is coming to an end, we love the idea of clearing out our kitchen cupboards and starting fresh. So have a look, gather all leftover nuts and dried fruit, and join us, as we say goodbye to 2019 with one last recipe.

Makes one large jar

200g oats
100g mixed nuts (we used walnuts and hazelnuts)
1 tsp ground cloves
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground nutmeg
pinch of salt
3 tbsp apple oil
4 tbsp vanilla fir honey
50g dried fruit (we used raisins)

Preheat the oven at 160C.

Roughly chop the nuts. Place them in a large baking dish, along with the oats.

In a small bowl, whisk together the apple oil, honey, spices and pinch of salt.

Pour over the oats and nuts and using your hands or a wooden spoon, mix everything very well together, until all oats and nuts are coated in the aromatic olive oil-honey.

Bake at 160C for around 30min, stirring every 10 minutes.

Remove from the oven and add the dried fruit.


This week we’ve got a lovely Christmas recipe for you. As we all know, carrots are the perfect ingredient to accompany our Christmas meal. This week we’re preparing them combining some very unique ingredients: orange blossom honey and grape molasses! We got our inspiration from our Valentine’s Dinner Experience (our first for 2020), in which our talented chef Lida is making a honey carrot soup. Yes, honey and carrots are very good friends!

In this recipe we added grape molasses, an ingredient that adds depth and balances the sweetness of the honey. It is made purely from grape must. A staple in my own kitchen, I highly recommend it!

So let’s get cooking. And have a warm and peaceful Christmas everyone!

Serves 6 as a side
1kg carrots
50g cranberries
5 tbps olive oil
3 tbsp orange blossom honey
3 tbsp grape molasses
1 large orange, zest and juice
salt (to taste)

Preheat the oven at 180C

Slice the carrots diagonally in uniform thin slices. They will shrink a bit while cooking, so make quite big slices.

Place them in a large baking tray, in one layer.

Sprinkle the cranberries.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the olive oil, honey, grape molasses, orange zest and juice. Season with salt.

Drizzle over the carrots and toss well everything together.

Roast in the oven until tender.


As we are well into winter and a few weeks away from Christmas, many of us are wondering what to prepare this year for our festive table. Let’s have a look at our recipes.

There is of course the question of stuffing. Shall we go with a vegan one? A less ordinary one made with bulgur wheat, or a colourful one with dried nectarines, cherries and almonds?

What is your favourite Christmas main? Here at Oliveology every year we’ve got different traditions and family recipes that come into the discussion.

But no matter what your main course is, plenty of colourful vegetable-based plates are a must! The last few years, we went for green. We loved our festive Brussels sprouts with walnut oil. Or how about a crunchy fresh green salad with galomyzithra cheese, dried figs and grape molasses?

This year we got our inspiration from one very unique ingredient. Truffle honey. Our truffle honey is made from acacia honey, infused with slivers of real black summer truffle. The intense aroma of this truffle honey pairs particularly well with cheese and charcuterie platters. But it is an excellent ingredient to add a unique flavour and a little luxury to this year’s table.

And as we are going for a colourful table, we have chosen a selection of orange winter vegetables. The inspiration came from a restaurant dish I used to prepare years back, where the chef was using only orange vegetables-what a brilliant idea! The result is a memorable dish that will definitely appeal not only to truffle lovers, but also to those who have never tasted truffle before.

Serves 6

1kg pumpkin
500g carrots
500g sweet potato
½ jar truffle honey
1/3 cup olive oil
1/3 cup of water
dried thyme
salt, pepper
50g walnuts (to serve)

Peel the pumpkin, carrots and sweet potatoes. Cut the vegetables in large bite-sized pieces and place in a large roasting tray.

In a bowl, whisk together the truffle honey, olive oil, water, thyme, salt and pepper.

Drizzle on top of your vegetables and toss everything together.

Bake at 180C for about 45 minutes, or until the vegetables are tended inside and slightly crunchy on the outside.

Sprinkle some walnuts and serve warm in a colourful platter.


This week we are feeling quite autumn-y. And what goes better with autumn, than wonderful baking activities on a Sunday afternoon!

So this week we are making a recipe that is something between a bread and a cake. What do we mean? It is a dough made with flour, nuts and dried fruit! It is very moist and not at all sweet. You can have it with tea, butter and honey for a filling breakfast, serve it as part of your cheese platter alongside crackers, or even enjoy as is.

For this recipe we used dried apricots and cherries. As our dried fruit have no added sugar, the result is dense and flavourful. But do not expect it to be sweet. It is more on the bitter/sour side. So if you wish, you can add a bit of honey or sugar in the recipe, or omit the balsamic vinegar. But first, try this one, it really is something special, especially served with plenty of honey.

Another idea would be to get our Autumn Baking bundle and use all of its ingredients for this recipe!

This recipe is adapted from a recipe created by Nena Ismirnoglou, whose recipes always surprise us with their simplicity and flavour.

Makes a medium-sized cake tin

200g all-purpose flour
8g dried yeast
300g dried fruit (we used a combination of apricots and cherries)
50ml balsamic cream with mandarin
120ml water
100g nuts (we used raw almonds and raw hazelnuts
2 tbsp oak honey, plus more to serve
½ tsp ground cloves, cinnamon or other warm spices

Finely chop the dried fruit. Warm up the balsamic cream with the water and pour over the fruit. Let them soak for 30minutes.

Ground the almonds and hazelnuts. Mix together your flour, ground nuts and spices.

In a large bowl whisk together the yeast with 2tbsp of warm water. Add to the bowl the flour-nuts mixture and dried fruit. Knead well until you have a slightly sticky dough. Cover with a tea-towel and let your dough rest in a warm environment for 30minutes.

Preheat your oven at 180C.

Place some greaseproof paper on a cake tin and drizzle it with 1 tablespoon of honey. Place your dough in the tin and push it gently. Drizzle the rest of the honey on top of the dough.

Bake for 30min. Remove from the oven and serve warm or at room temperature.


As we all are now well into autumn, gloomy mornings are this week’s inspiration for our recipe. Let me explain. I love autumn- and autumn weather for that matter. But I am not really a morning person. As a child, I remember wonderful breakfasts served at our family table to be the thing that made me excited about leaving the comfort of my bed. As an adult, I really don’t know how my parents managed to create such delicious things in the mornings.

Maybe they planned ahead. Like we are doing this week! So we need something exciting to make us craw out of bed and give us energy to get on with our busy days. And since this summer we didn’t make a granola, as we did last summer and the summer before that, we decided it’s time.

So here you go, this week’s recipe is our autumn granola. For this one we used our favourite raw hazelnuts, pure cocoa powder, and oak honey. This is a honey that is not too sweet and perfectly complements the nuttiness of the hazelnuts and the sweetness of the chocolate. Because yes, we decided to indulge a bit, and used a tiny bit of dark chocolate. You can of course omit it if you want, the recipe works great without it. And as always, we made our granola with olive oil!

Makes one large jar:
200g oats
100g raw hazelnuts
2 tbsp raw cocoa
3 tbsp oak honey
2 tbsp olive oil
50g dark chocolate (optional)
pinch of salt

Preheat the oven at 150C.

Roughly chop the hazelnuts and the chocolate (if using).

In a large bowl mix together the hazelnuts, chocolate pieces, oats, cocoa and salt.

Lay some greaseproof paper in a baking tray and place your oat mixture.

In a separate bowl whisk together the honey and olive oil.

Drizzle the olive oil/honey on top of the oats mixture and using your hands, mix everything together until well-mixed.

Bake in the oven, stirring every 10 min and for about 30min or until the granola is golden-brown. Let it cool and store in an airtight jar.

Oh, and did we tell you? This is perfect simply served with milk!