On Halloween we like to dress up, change ourselves. On All Hallows’ Eve, we become different people. Even just for one night. It’s fun and often, cathartic. But what about food? We all have recipes that we trust. Familiar flavours. And very often we stick to them religiously. For us, Halloween is the time of the year when we experiment. We take comfort foods of our past and turn them into something new. With the easiest way possible. Change one ingredient. Think about it. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel, just think outside the box. Get inspired by the ingredients themselves.

Our inspiration for this year is our limited edition apple oil. Its complex flavour will change completely a comforting squash soup. Olives, apples, walnuts, cinnamon, honey, lemon and sage are all crushed together to create it. It is not your ordinary infused oil.

Follow our recipe for the warm squash soup:

For a large pot of soup (feeds 5 or 7 really hungry people)

1.5kg pumpkin (or squash)
1/2 cup extra virgin live oil
1 small white onion
1 small red onion
1 piece of ginger, the size of your two thumbs together
1 red chilli
1-2 tsp of mixed spices (we used coriander, cumin, turmeric, caraway)
Salt to taste
1-1.5l vegetable stock

Cut the squash in wedges or in half and roast it in the oven, at 200C, drizzled with olive oil and a bit of salt, until the flesh is tender, around 40 minutes. Scoop out all the flesh (You can skip this last step if you want).

Peel and roughly chop the onions, ginger, chilli. In a large pot pour some olive oil and gently fry them. Add the spices and stir. Add the squash and stir again so that everything comes together. Pour 1lt of stock and bring to a boil. Then lower the heat and let the soup simmer, so that the aromas blend and the squash is completely soft, around 30-45 minutes. Transfer the soup to a blender, and blend until smooth. Return to pot and if needed add more stock, salt, spices.

And now for the metamorphosis.
Serve the soup with Greek yogurt and drizzle our limited edition apple oil. The soup is spicy and sweet, warm and comforting. The yogurt adds the much needed tanginess and freshness. And the apple oil, oh with its sweet aromas of the semi-ripe Koroneiki olives, apples, honey and cinnamon and the nuttiness from the walnuts and sage. You’re in for a treat!


Two weeks ago (8-9/10/16) we attended the London Greek Wine Festival, raising our glass to celebrate this brilliant event. Although Greece has been home to winemaking for over 6000 years and with more than 300 indigenous grape varieties; Greek wines have been underrated for decades.

However, there has been a shift in recent years and, it seems that finally, it’s their time to shine globally. This post will introduce you to four fascinating and unique indigenous varieties: Assyrtiko, Moschofilero, Agiorgitiko and Xinomavro and will inspire you to pair this ancient elixir with food.

Assyrtiko is a white grape variety, produced mainly in Santorini (PDO Santorini). It has a fresh, citrussy, mineral driven character with sea salt finish. It produces a dry white wine, but its multipurpose grapes can even extend to dessert wines. This variety is the ideal complement to haute cuisine, fish, seafood and, surprisingly, even meat dishes. We love it with grilled octopus, sardines as well as the classic Santorini-style fava beans.

Did you know? Assyrtiko is a rare case of white with tannins.

Moschofilero is a white grape variety, produced mainly in the Peloponnese (PDO Mantinia). It is an aromatic variety with surprising freshness, crisp acidity and wild floral intensity. It does not only make a still table wine but delicious rosé, sparkling and dessert wines. This exotic grape produces the perfect aperitif or complement to a wide variety of elegant dishes, Middle and Far East cuisine, sushi and seafood. We love it with all “quintessential Greek” grilled seafood such as red mullet.

Agiorgitiko – Nemea is a red grape variety, produced mainly in the Peloponnese (PDO Nemea). It has a deep, dark ruby colour, mid acidity and soft tannins. The range of wine styles include rich, complex, age worthy reds for the cellar; as well as light, easy drinking wines with the fresh aromas of red fruits. These captivating wines are exceptionally food friendly and you can even pair them with fish. We love it with a classic beef steak or with a slow roasted tomato-sauce stew (kokkinisto). Agiorgitiko grapes are also used to produce our wonderful Petimezi (Grape molasses)

Did you know? According to an ancient legend, the Nemea-Agiorgitiko grapes got their rich, dark colour and their soft and mysterious flavour from the blood of the lion that Hercules slew.

Xinomavro (Ksinomavro) is a red grape variety, produced in the Northern Greece (PDO Naoussa and PDO Amynteo). This intriguing variety can be difficult to cultivate. It has a deep red colour, a complex aromatic character including dried tomatoes and spices, high acidity and strong tannins. When the variety is expressed in wines, it is used in indigenous wine blends, as well as in rosés, including brilliant rustic ones and of course, it is exceptional when aged. This variety makes a great food pairing wine, ideal for food with intense and rich flavours. We love it with Northern Greece specialities like rabbit or game stew or simply with some smoked cheese.


Apple Day is almost here and at Oliveology we always support initiatives that celebrate seasonality. Next to our shop at Borough Market, one can find myriad apples of different sizes, colours and flavours. They are simply too tempting to resist.

And we know exactly what to do with them. Marianna’s mum makes the most delicious and moist cake. She uses extra virgin olive oil instead of butter and uses whatever she has left in the kitchen, be it apples, pumpkin, carrots- nothing goes to waste. One of our favourite things in the world is when hand written old recipes are handed down to us. Today it becomes much easier “take a pic of your mum’s apple cake recipe and send it to me”, and within minutes, you can enter the kitchen and start baking.

Kalliopi’s Olive Oil Cake

1 cup extra virgin olive oil 
3 cups grated (or cut in cubes) apples
2 cups of sugar
2 eggs, preferably organic
2 cups all purpose flour
1 tbs baking soda
1 tbs of cinnamon
1 cup almonds or walnuts

Mix together the sugar and olive oil. For this recipe, we go for our  22°C organic extra virgin olive oil, made with semi ripe olives. Its mellow, fruity aroma and silky texture are ideal for this cake. You see, olive oil is one of the main ingredients, yet it should not overpower the rest.

Whisk 2 eggs and then slowly add 2 cups of all purpose flour, the baking soda and cinnamon. Add the grated apples, and if you feel like it, 1 cup of coarsely chopped nuts – we went for almonds. Mix everything together with a wooden spoon and transfer into a baking dish. Bake at 180°C for approximately 35-45 minutes or until cake is golden brown on top and cooked through.

Now, you can serve the cake as is, or preferably with Greek yogurt and a drizzle of our limited edition apple oil.

If you’re in London visit us at Borough market to celebrate the glorious apple season with us on Sunday the 23rd of October.


We think that life is too short for one type of pesto. So why don’t you “Greek up” your pesto pasta by replacing basil with oregano and pine nuts with almonds?

Ingredients:

500g pasta –we recommend linguini or whole wheat penne

For the pesto

200g feta crumbled
1/2 teacup Kalamata olives –without their pits
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil (and 1/4 cup for serving)
2 garlic cloves
25g almonds –toasted, if desired for enhanced flavour
Bunch of parsley (chopped)
1 teaspoon dried Greek oregano
Mizithra or graviera for serving
Freshly ground pepper
Sesame and parsley (if desired) for serving

Method:

Tip the pasta into a large pan of boiling salted water and cook until al dente. Set aside 1/2 cup of pasta water.

In the meantime, place the parsley, almonds, cloves and oregano in the bowl of a food processor (or blender) fitted with a steel blade and blend to a puree. Add the olives, feta and pasta water and blend again. With the processor running, slowly pour the olive oil into the bowl through the feed tube. Pulse until well combined, adding blanching water by tablespoons to thin if needed, and stopping occasionally to scrape down sides.

Transfer pasta to a bowl and toss vigorously, drizzling with oil and adding pesto, sesame, freshly ground pepper, parsley (if desired) and cheese as you continue to toss, until pasta is glossy and well coated with sauce. Serve hot or cold. Enjoy! Store the pesto in the refrigerator or freezer with a thin film of olive oil on top.


There is a lot to be said about food waste lately. Some have strong opinions about waste, others do not. But one thing is certain. There are a few things in our kitchen that do go to waste and can be useful. Pickle juice, brine, stale bread. Here at Oliveology we love discovering creative ways to use these neglected leftovers.

Being so passionate about our olives, we always wondered if there is anything exciting one can do with the liquid that is left in the pot (after we have happily eaten these little bursts of flavour). Autumn is now in its full swing and we feel slightly nostalgic about Greek summer afternoons by the sea. Those moments of leisurely sipping ouzo, a small plate of olives on the side, the warm afternoon sun and good company…

When we open a tub of dark brown Kalamata olives with ouzo (Great Taste awarded!), the aroma of Greek summer fills the kitchen.

As we nibble on these fleshy olives, the ouzo aftertaste develops into a eureka moment. There is no way we will let this beautiful liquid go to waste. We will use it for cooking! After all our liquid marinade is made using our organic olive oil, vinegar, ouzo, star-anise, fennel seeds and lemon.

Sear an ethically sourced cod fillet in that aromatic liquid, and once slightly golden, transfer into a baking dish. Top each piece with a few slices of lemon, white wine if you wish, caramelised fennel (yes, we did use the liquid from our tub for that too!) and the remaining olives (although we know you’ve probably nibbled most of them by now) Cook uncovered in the oven for 8-12 minutes, until the fish is cooked through.

Sprinkle some fennel tops on top, drizzle extra virgin olive oil and generously squeeze some lemon juice. Maybe add some more olives, they are after all so hard to resist. And there you go, a simple, healthy dinner and zero waste from our olives. You can even wash the pot and reuse it. 🙂


Have you ever thought making a cake without any added sugar? This is an ancient and very simple recipe that varies in different regions or different islands of Greece. People used back then grape molasses or petimezi as sweetener in baking, and it does work wonders.

Ingredients:

1 cup olive oil
1 ½ cups grape molasses
1 cup orange juice
peel from 1 orange
3 cups flour
1tsp baking soda
1tbs baking powder
1tsp cinnamon
½ tsp ground cloves
½ cup crushed almonds or walnuts (optional)

Instructions:

Mix the olive oil with the grape molasses. Add the soda into the orange juice, orange peel, spices, then add into the olive oil and molasses mix. Add the baking powder into the flour and then stir into the molasses. Combine slowly until a thick batter forms. Pour the batter into a well greased pan and bake for about 1 hour into a preheated oven at 180 oC.

Buy our grape molasses


When asked to name a case of a bud, more popular than the flower or even the fruit, which one comes to mind? I always think about the caper.

Capers are beautiful pea sized, dark green flower buds known since the Palaeolithic-era. In Ancient Greece, Hippocrates mentioned its expectorant properties; Dioscourides advised mouthwashes with an infusion made with capers boiled in vinegar. It was also believed that its skin had toning and aphrodisiac properties. The poet Antiphanis mentions capers as one of the spices along with sesame, cumin, thyme, marjoram, vinegar and olives.

The caper bushes are native to the Mediterranean and usually grow in rocky, dry areas. Other varieties can be found in other places of Europe, as well as Asia and Africa. They are categorised and sold by size. Their price is usually high, due to their laborious harvesting method: not only do they have to be hand-picked but also picking needs to take place quite early in the morning. Then, they are sun dried and either salted or pickled. The unpicked buds, bloom into white- pinkish flowers and in the evenings, they release a sweet, pleasant scent. In Greece the caper leaves are considered a delicacy and are usually added fresh in salads or pickled as mezze. When opportunity comes, do try them- you are in for a treat!

These spice buds with their piquant, salty and sour flavour as well as their floral aroma, act as flavour enhancers. They are great with fish, tomatoes and onions and are often used in conjunction with lemon. Widely used as a condiment or a flavourful garnish, they are essential to dishes like Santorini fava, puttanesca pasta, Nicoise salad, as well as in tartar and remoulade sauces.

Nutritional value wise, they are very low in calories and contain many phytonutrients, anti-oxidants (high in in flavonoid compounds rutin and quercetin) such as and vitamins essential for optimal health. We would advise you to pay special attention to their high sodium levels.

So, what are you waiting for? Treat yourselves to our organic and wild capers in olive oil (not brine); they are hand picked, prepared and packed for us with love, care and expertise by Mrs Love (Κα. Αγάπη) in Southern Crete!